Recognize a local arts hero with an S.C. arts award

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 27 August 2018 COLUMBIA, S.C. – Not all heroes wear capes, goes the internet meme. Indeed, you can find some in tutus, smocks, business attire, concert black, stage makeup, or even a t-shirt and jeans. And your local arts hero can now be nominated for the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts or the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award. Both awards honor South Carolinians who create or support the arts, and both award programs use a simple, online nomination process. Nominations for both awards are due Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018. Awards will be presented in the spring.


Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards

Nomination letters for Verner Awards should describe the nominee's exemplary contributions to the arts in South Carolina and should address any characteristics included in the category descriptions. The letter should answer these questions:
  • What makes the nominee superior or extraordinary?
  • How has the nominee demonstrated leadership in the arts?
  • What exceptional achievements or contributions has the nominee made, and what has been their impact on the community, state or beyond?
  • What other information about the nominee is important to know as they are considered for the state's highest award in the arts?
Verner Award nominations can be made in the following categories:
  • Arts in Education
  • Organization
  • Government
  • Business/Foundation
  • Individual
  • Artist
For complete nomination guidelines or more information about the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com/verner, or contact Deputy Director Milly Hough: mhough@arts.sc.gov or 803.734.8698.

 Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award

Created by the legislature in 1987 to recognize lifetime achievement in the traditional arts, the Folk Heritage Award is presented annually by the South Carolina General Assembly to practitioners and advocates of traditional arts significant to communities throughout the state. The S. C. Arts Commission partners with USC's McKissick Museum to manage the awards. Up to four artists and one advocate may receive awards each year. Nominations are accepted in two categories:
  • Artists: South Carolina artists who have dedicated their lives to the practice of art forms that have been passed down through their families and communities and who have demonstrated a commitment to keeping their tradition alive. Past awards have recognized art forms such as basket making, gospel singing, fiddling, hammock making and boat building.
  • Advocates: South Carolina individuals and groups that have worked to further traditional culture in the state. Those who are not traditional artists, but who have provided service that helps to sustain and promote South Carolina traditions, are eligible for the advocacy award.
Before submitting a nomination, you are strongly advised to contact Folklife & Traditional Arts Program Director Laura Marcus Green to determine whether your nominee is eligible: lgreen@arts.sc.gov or 803.734.8764. For more information about the Folk Heritage Award, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com/folkheritage.
ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISSION The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

HUB101: Submission Guidelines and Hints

Classes are back in session across South Carolina, and that means a new season of arts and cultural events is about to start as well. The Hub and its popular "subsidiary" Arts Daily are here to make you aware of all the great South Carolina arts news and events. While S.C. Arts Commission staff curate both, content is also largely driven by reader submissions – particularly as it relates to events on Arts Daily. Those of us who work in the arts sector tend to fall into one of two categories. You're either A) a "lifer" with 10 or more years experience at, often the same but sometimes, two or three arts organizations or you're B) brand spankin' new. (Look, we know there's middle ground because B's can't turn into A's overnight, but this isn't philosophy or logic and we ask that you go with it for now.) As you might have noticed with the recent spate of arts job postings on The Hub, there are several who fall into the latter category. Regardless, everyone needs a periodic refresher. Class is in session, and we welcome you to HUB101.


Got news? Submit Story.

"We’re looking for news and stories about the arts in South Carolina. Have you had a great arts experience?  Do you have a story idea about how the arts made a difference? Have you received an arts award? Has your organization issued a call for artists?  Share your news with us, and we may share it with our readers!" Put your important news releases here: Hirings, milestone seasons, significant guest artists, prizes or awards given or received, and the like. We also take calls for art, calls for artists, calls for submissions, calls for pizza, calls for applications, job postings, and on and on. Got a new twist on something familiar? Doing something groundbreaking? Let's have it. The common thread here is newsworthiness. We're a news aggregator for the arts in South Carolina. That said, believe us: we exercise editorial discretion on the regular. Not everything makes it (and there can be many reasons for that, to include lack of newsworthiness, our workload, etc.), but that doesn't mean don't try. If your try is newsworthy and well written, there's a good chance we'll help you amplify across the state and beyond. And did we mention newsworthiness?

Got events? Submit Event.

"Art is happening every day. Here's how to find it.  A partnership between the S.C. Arts Commission, South Carolina Public Radio and the College of Charleston. ... Please submit at least one month in advance and allow up to 10 working days for your listing to appear." Arts Daily is the events calendar arm of The Hub. Many, many people  are familiar with it because of its unique, statewide radio promotion component through the years on South Carolina Public Radio with host Jeanette Guinn. No event is too big or too small. Sure, it needs to have an arts connection, but here are the two biggest things you need to know:
  • Please make it concise (brief!) and well written. An actual, live person reviews and edits every. single. submission. Real talk: Guess which submissions get approved?
  • And once more, with feeling: Please submit at least one month in advance and allow up to 10 working days for your listing to appear. This is the big one. You planned ahead for your event. Plan ahead for promotion. In order to make it to S.C. Public Radio, your event needs to be submitted at least one (1) month in advance, if not before. And because of the approval process, particularly this time of year when everyone's season starts in the same six-week window and artists and organizations are submitting all their events, we need 10 business days to get them posted.
Editorial discretion can come into play with Arts Daily, but less so than The Hub. The vast majority of submissions are approved. Answer the five W's (and one H), slap a link and phone number on there, and give us a JPG at no greater than 1400px x 500px saved for web at at least 72dpi quality, and you're in a good position to get your event in front of a statewide audience on the web and radio.

Got a new spot? Submit Venue.

After four years, venue submissions are less and less common. It's not often that new venues crop up. But it happens, and in order for an event there to be posted, we need to know about your venue. CLASS DISMISSED!

Grants Roundup Special: Emergency Grant

Though far from the only thing, grants are certainly among the main things we do here. And because of their importance in our work, and what they mean to so many of you, The Hub wants to help keep Arts Commission grants top-of-mind and reduce the instances of people telling us, "If only we'd known about X grant!" We can't reach everybody, but we can try. On Mondays with deadlines on the horizon, "Grants Roundup" highlights first what grants are due that week and then includes what's coming later in increments.


Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Emergency Grant

This program is intended to provide interim financial assistance to qualified painters, printmakers, and sculptors whose needs are the result of an unforeseen, catastrophic incident, and who lack the resources to meet that situation. Each grant is given as one-time assistance for a specific emergency, examples of which are fire, flood, or emergency medical need. This program has no deadlines. The maximum amount of this grant is $15,000; an award of $5,000 is typical. The program does not consider requests for dental work, chronic situations, capital improvements, or projects of any kind; nor can it consider situations resulting from general indebtedness or lack of employment. Eligibility To be eligible for this program, an artist must be able to demonstrate a minimum involvement of ten years in a mature phase of his or her work. Artists must work in the disciplines of painting, sculpture or printmaking. Each application will be reviewed by the Directors, who will exercise their discretion in considering it, and will determine the amount of each award. Applicants should note there is a set amount appropriated for these grants each fiscal year; once this budgetary limit has been reached, the Foundation will not be able to judge any additional requests on their merits. Second-party requests are honored only when the applicant is physically unable to communicate with the Foundation. Review procedures for completed applications begin as soon as they are received. Full review generally takes about four weeks from the time an application is complete. Situations with imminent deadlines will receive priority. Please go here for more information and instructions on submitting an application.
Grants

This week

These are to serve mainly as final reminders. Most grant applications simply cannot be undertaken well in this short a time frame. Consult your county or discipline coordinator with questions.
  • n/a

Next week

  • n/a

Next 30(ish)

  • n/a (See first note below)

Important Notes

  • Applications are now being accepted for individual artist fellowships in four disciplines. The deadline for artists in those disciplines to apply for the $5,000 grants is Nov. 8.
  • You are encouraged to also consult the SCAC deadline page for up-to-date information on all grant deadlines (subject to change) and deadlines for non-grant programs.
  • For next steps, grant guidance, and more information, consult:
    • your county coordinator if you represent local organizations, businesses, or educational institutions, or
    • your discipline coordinator if you're an individual artist or serve the statewide population.

SCAC Fellow’s new book out Sept. 25

Charleston writer F. Rutledge Hammes, the S.C. Arts Commission's current fellowship recipient for prose, is set to release his debut novel, A Curious Matter of Men with Wings, on Sept. 25. The book has received glowing praise from writers like New York Times bestselling author Dorothea Benton Frank who writes, “F. Rutledge Hammes is that rare new voice you run across once or maybe twice in a lifetime. His spectacular debut novel, A Curious Matter of Men with Wings, soars! It is a coming of age cautionary tale about power. It’s a mystery and a love story wrapped up in humidity and pluff mud and it is as fascinating as it is addicting.” Set for release by Atlanta-based SFK Press, Hammes’ debut novel tells the story of the Walpole family who fled their sordid past and escaped to one of the nearly 2,000 uninhabited sea islands off the South Carolina coast. The novel opens with the two Walpole boys taking their little sister out on their john boat for the first time to pirate the waterways for beer and loose change. In the process, their little sister goes overboard and appears to have drowned, until two men with gigantic wings swoop down and carry her body away into the sky. The news of her disappearance hits the family particularly hard, and the mother goes so far as to fashion herself wings and tries to fly. The Walpole boys set off in search of their little sister and, in the process, discover the truth behind the centuries-old Gullah tale of the Flying Men as well as numerous other mysteries native to the South Carolina sea islands. A book release party will be held at Blue Bicycle Books (420 King St., Charleston) on Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018 from 5-7 p.m. It is free and open to the public. Sue Monk Kidd, bestselling author of The Secret Life of Bees, writes, “A Curious Matter of Men with Wings is where magic comes to life in a bold story that celebrates the Gullah world of the South Carolina sea islands. With lyrical prose, the novel takes us into a hidden realm where life is still enchanted and storytelling abounds. In these pages, the transfixing Walpole family grapples with loss, the madness of grief, and ultimately healing, while surrounded by a community whose only salvation lies in the ties that bind them.”


"...It’s a mystery and a love story wrapped up in humidity and pluff mud, and it is as fascinating as it is addicting.” - Dorothea Benton Frank, bestselling author


Hammes was born in South Carolina's Lowcountry, where he fell in love with the waterways, the people, and the folklore that inhabit the sea islands. His whole life, he has been writing about the Charleston area and sea island culture and, for the past decade, he has been teaching the young writers who will keep our lush storytelling tradition alive. Having grown up the oldest in a family of ten, stories of family come naturally to him. His grandparents moved out to the sea islands early in their marriage and made friends in the Gullah community, and he grew up enamored by all the stories and folklore his grandmother told him as a child. Hammes says, “I have long believed that magic is at the heart of Charleston, and so magic must be at the heart of the Charleston novel.” Through A Curious Matter of Men with Wings, Hammes hopes readers will see the redemption that comes to people who keep their promises to one another and stand together regardless of ethnicity, culture and class. Hammes earned his MFA in fiction from Old Dominion University, has had numerous short stories, essays and poems published in various journals and magazines around the country, and is a contributing writer in several books. He is also the 2019 South Carolina Arts Commission Prose Fellow and is presently Director of the Creative Writing program at Charleston County School of the Arts, the most awarded middle- and high-school writing program in the nation. For more information on A Curious Matter of Men with Wings, visit frutledgehammes.com.

New NEA report shows increasing arts attendance

The performing arts cultural season is upon us, and a new report from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) might encourage you to head to the box office sooner than later.

Between 2012 and 2017, the share of adults who attended visual or performing arts activities grew by 3.6 percentage points to 132.3 million people, representing nearly 54 percent of the U.S. adult population. Performing arts events range from dance to theater performances while visual arts events include going to art museums, galleries, and craft festivals.

Most of the increase in this survey came from visiting art museums or galleries and the “informal” arts sector that includes outdoor performing arts festivals and touring places for their design or historic value. Also scoring high is attending “other” performing arts events—those not tracked individually in the SPPA—such as rap and hip hop, country music, rock, or folk music events.

Other highlights from the report:
  • Between 2012 and 2017, the rate of poetry-reading among adults grew by 76 percent, to 28 million people in 2017, and the share of 18-24-year-olds who read poetry more than doubled.
  • Greater participation by African Americans, Asian Americans, and 25-54-year-olds helped the performing arts numbers increase.
  • Art museum or gallery visits grew by 13% in the period studied.
Get the full report and read the study announcement on NEA.gov.

Tuning Up: 1858 Prize and forum tomorrow + SEPF 2019 lineup

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Collaborative first steps. Tomorrow is a big night at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston. Dr. Leo Twiggs is set to receive the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. The pride of Orangeburg is the first S.C. artist (ahem, #SCartists) to receive the $10,000 prize. But you knew all that. What you might not know is that afterward is the Amy P. Coy Forum and 1858 Prize Party (6-8 p.m., 135 Meeting St., Charleston) at which representatives from ArtFields, South Arts, and the Gibbes will use the forum to discuss collaboration among the Southeast's three biggest arts prizes, which happen to be awarded by those entities. Where will it lead? We don't know, but that's why we're going. See you there? $35. SEPF announces 2019 guest artists. (And there are some, ahem, key names here.) Summertime is music festival time, and every year Columbia is a piano hotspot. The Southeastern Piano Festival is set to return June 16-23, 2019 and last week announced their guest artists. Artistic Director Joseph Rackers promises and incredible week of music. (Take it from The Hub – don't miss Alessio Bax). In addition to performances, accomplished pianists will give masterclasses and it all comes to a head with the Arthur Fraser International Piano Competition on June 21. (The teenage winner performs a concerto with the South Carolina Philharmonic.)

Tuning Up: Additional ArtsReady resources + arts and justice

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


After the storm. Though we're keenly aware of Hurricane Florence's effects on communities in the Pee Dee and northern Grand Strand, most of South Carolina was spared relative to what was expected when our offices closed on Tuesday last week. In addition to the resources we posted last week, two new ones came to our attention thanks to the S.C. Arts Alliance. While ArtsReady issues are still pretty top of mind, develop a plan now so you don't have to scramble later.
  1. The Performing Arts Readiness (PAR) Project, funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, offers grants to arts organizations to develop emergency plans and continuity of operations plans. The National Coalition for Arts Preparedness & Emergency Response (NCAPER) is taking over the Arts Ready component, and working on a simpler online tool to develop such plans. The PAR website also has recorded webinars that we have been producing on different areas of readiness as well as the grant guidelines.
  2. The NCAPER website is being developed but currently has a webpage on Americans for the Arts' website. You can download a PDF of the Cultural Placekeeping Guide which was published by NCAPER after Hurricane Sandy.

The arts on social justice. We switch gears now to another hot topic: social justice. Here are two arts-related items on the topic in South Carolina:
  1. The Columbia Museum of Art is to hold For Freedoms Town Hall: Freedom of Expression – Arts and Justice, a free event in participation with For Freedoms’ 50 State Initiative, on Monday, Sept. 24, at 6:30 p.m. A panel of artistic and legal experts will discuss this First Amendment right from artistic, local, and global perspectives. Serving on the panel are poet, Verner Award winner, and 2011 National Book Award winner Nikky Finney and Trustus Theatre Artistic Director Chad Henderson. For Freedoms is a national platform for greater engagement in the arts and in civil society. Inspired by Norman Rockwell’s 1943 paintings of the four universal freedoms articulated by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt in 1941: freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from want, and freedom from fear.
  2. Photographer Antonio Modesto (right), who received a grant for his work from Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg (an SCAC grantee!), was in the CCC spotlight for his "Faces of the Upstate" project. It provides insights into the lives of Upstate South Carolina's unique and often marginalized residents.

Are you ArtsReady?

Hurricane Florence is approaching the East Coast and will likely have landfall Thursday or Friday. Gov. Henry McMaster declared a state of emergency. Coastal S.C. counties are to begin evacuating at noon Tuesday, and schools as far inland as Lexington County are closing to provide shelters and buses to assist in evacuation procedures. Read more here. While Florence's path remains difficult to predict, artists and arts organizations in South Carolina should anticipate impact and prepare accordingly.

Bonus content: South Carolina Emergency Management Division

If you have an ArtsReady/readiness plan, we hope that triggering it into action provides you with the ability to prepare for the storm. If not, we encourage you to take a few basic steps to prepare your office/venue/studio for the potential impact before departing for your personal preparation - unless you are under an evacuation order, in which case you should follow the instructions of local/state officials immediately. If you aren’t in the hurricane’s path, please use this time to take a look at your own readiness planning in the event of a future emergency. Visit ArtsReady to start or build upon your readiness plan; sign up for free webinars on a variety of readiness and disaster planning offered through the Performing Arts Readiness project; and sign up to get regular information on grants, trainings and programs to improve your organization’s readiness and resiliency (much of this project’s content is relevant to arts organizations and artists of all disciplines).

Be prepared!

Please use and share the following resources to ensure you are ready: HENFT Hurricane Preparedness Tips for Cultural Institutions Cerf+'s Resources for Artists: A few additional tips for arts organizations:
  • Assign a readiness/emergency leader for your organization through whom all communications and information should be relayed. Decide who makes the decision about suspending operations/events, and how those decisions are communicated.
  • Ensure you can carry out banking activity remotely, and that staff can work remotely if your offices/facility are inaccessible.
  • If practical, de-install exhibits that may be threatened by weather or water and remove to a safer location.
  • Secure outdoor sculptures, furniture, bike racks, signage, etc. – anything that can become a projectile in strong winds.
  • Move costumes, scenery, instruments, valuable equipment and collections that are in areas vulnerable to flooding (i.e., the floor, the basement) or susceptible to rain (near windows or under roofs) out of harm’s way.
Weather event resources: If your facility is impacted, there are a number of resources to assist you: https://www.artsready.org/home/public_article/887 And more resources are listed at https://www.lyrasis.org/LYRASIS%20Digital/Pages/Preservation%20Services/Disaster%20Resources/Response-and-Recovery.aspx
Thanks to our colleagues at South Arts for much of the content above.

Welcome to National Arts in Education Week

Good morning, and happy National Arts in Education Week! We've curated content for The Hub and our social media feeds this week to highlight the work being done in Arts Ed by professionals in South Carolina. Let's get it started with Glenis Redmond in Greenville in this Americans for the Arts video: All week we'll be sharing infographics like this one on our social media feeds: The Hub will feature guest posts related to National Arts in Education Week on Tuesday and Thursday.

Greyson Smith joins SCAC as accountant

There's a new face wandering the halls at the S.C. Arts Commission. Greyson Smith (coincidentally a Columbia artist) joined our team Tuesday and is completing his first "full" week as our new accountant. For an agency that is set to distribute some $4 million in grant funding statewide (second time today we've successfully worked that link in...), filling a full-time accountant void is pretty important. The Columbia native graduated from Winthrop University with a bachelor's in business administration with a concentration in accounting, as well as a bachelor's in fine arts. In addition to his years of work experience as an accountant at Companion Life Insurance Company and Enterprise Holdings, Inc., he is also known as an actively exhibiting mixed-media artist and for his past service on the board of directors at 701 Center for Contemporary Art. Welcome, Greyson – we're glad you're here!

Tuning Up: Literally (spoiler: it’s about orchestras)

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


This morning we offer some news and notes from South Carolina orchestras. ICYMI: Three Mor-ihiko Years. The South Carolina Philharmonic announced a three-year contract extension for Music Director Morihiko Nakahara this week, keeping him in Columbia into (at least) 2022 for a total of (at least) 14 seasons. The Free Times caught up with the well-traveled maestro, who begins his 11th season, and the orchestra's 55th, Saturday, Sept. 29. Rock Hill Symphony debuts tomorrow night. Literally. As in, first-ever concert, not just new season. Pianist Marina Lomazov (an SCAC music performance fellowship recipient) is the featured soloist for the Tchaikovsky First Piano Concerto on Music Director David Rudge's premiere program, which also offers works by Berlioz, Rimsky-Korsakov, Smetana, and more. It is sold out (and has been), but check out the first season's offerings here. Season's greetings! Rock Hill joins 10 other professional orchestras in South Carolina. September and October are typically when orchestra season gets going. Here are start dates for others from around the Palmetto State: Did you have any idea South Carolina has so many orchestras? This doesn't even count the college and community orchestras. All 10 listed above will receive operating support (or more) from the S.C. Arts Commission in FY19.

New SCAC grants make $4 million impact in state’s communities

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 6 September 2018 COLUMBIA, S.C. – The South Carolina Arts Commission is announcing $3,982,012 in grants for South Carolina communities, artists, arts organizations, and schools for the 2019 fiscal year as of Sept. 1, 2018.

“Funds appropriated by the legislature help local arts providers offer more than six million arts experiences to citizens and visitors every year,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said. Serwah Armah-Koranteng “These grants affect wide-ranging organizations and diverse audiences statewide, from Town Theatre in Columbia, starting its centennial season next week, to Wits End Poetry, holding a poetry slam event in Greenville later in the month. They enable our four fellowship recipients from Charleston, Columbia, Little River, and Spartanburg to develop their talents, and provide support for artisans like Serwah Armah-Koranteng to strengthen Africstyle mobile boutique, her arts-based business. And perhaps most importantly, they help the next generation hone creativity and problem-solving skills with funding for arts-based education programs in schools.” Six new Arts in Basic Curriculum Project sites are being awarded grants to strategically plan and implement arts education as part of the school day, bringing the total to 84 and giving almost 171,000 South Carolina students access to the educational benefits of the arts. Other grants range from operating grants and project support for organizations to seed money and fellowships for individual artists, ensuring an assortment of relevant arts experiences across South Carolina. Additional grants will be awarded throughout the year with potential for impact in all counties: three rounds of Quarterly Project Support grants to benefit projects by artists and arts organizations, and additional Teacher Standards Initiative grants will be awarded to help teachers acquire supplies, materials, and expertise to meet the 2017 College and Career Ready Standards for Visual and Performing Arts Proficiency. “Ongoing work to create opportunities in rural counties as well as more populated areas is attracting additional grant applications for our operating support funds,” May said. Operating support grants make up 49 percent of the FY19 total, and arts education grants make up 46 percent. In FY18, which finished June 30, the S.C. Arts Commission awarded $4,060,290 and expects to exceed that total by the close of FY19 on June 30, 2019, May said.

Amounts Awarded to Programs in Primary Grant Categories

Arts in Education: $1,822,446 Grants help fund curriculum planning and implementation, artist residencies, performances, professional development for teachers and summer and afterschool arts programs.
  • Arts in the Basic Curriculum (ABC) Advancement: $881,023  Awarded to 84 schools and school districts that are participating in the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, which works to ensure every child in South Carolina has access to a quality, comprehensive education in the arts. The ABC Project is cooperatively directed by the Arts Commission, the S.C. Department of Education, and the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Winthrop University.
  • Arts Education Projects: $336,193 Thirty-four grants funding projects and programs that support quality arts education programs in both traditional arts education settings (schools, arts organizations) and other organizations that utilize the arts to advance learning in children (social service, health, community, education or other organizations).
  • Education Pilot Projects: $292,000
  • Teacher Standards Implementation: $750 (1st quarter only) One grant (to date) to help arts teachers acquire the supplies, materials, and expertise necessary for meeting the 2017 College and Career Ready Standards for Visual and Performing Arts Proficiency.
  • Arts in the Basic (ABC) Curriculum: $312,480 Two grants to support management of the ABC Project Partnership.
Operating Support: $1,942,580 Grants help strengthen arts organizations that bring ongoing arts experiences and services to individuals, other organizations and communities throughout the state.
  • General Operating Support: $1,753,406 One hundred twenty-five grants for arts organizations.
  • Operating Support for Small Organizations: $83,016 Thirty-four grants for arts organizations with annual expense budgets of less than $75,000.
  • Statewide Organizations: $106,158 Seven grants for arts organizations operating statewide.
Folklife and Traditional Arts: $101,033 Grants support programs that promote a greater understanding and visibility of South Carolina’s many cultures through documentation and presentation of traditional art forms, their practitioners and their communities.
  • Organization grants: $22,500 Five grants to support nonprofit organizations that seek to promote and preserve the traditional arts practiced across the state.
  • Apprenticeships: $7,500 Four grants that support a partnership between a master artist, who will share artistic and cultural knowledge, and a qualified apprentice, who will then continue to pursue the art form.
  • Partnerships: $71,033 One grant to support management of the Folklife and Traditional Arts Partnership.
Subgranting: $66,437 Seven awards to local arts councils that distribute quarterly grants to organizations and artists in their regions. This program is funded in part by an award from the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of The Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Artists Ventures Initiative: $15,000 Three grants to individual artists for projects designed to help them develop the knowledge and skills to build satisfying, sustainable careers. Individual Artist Fellowships: $20,000 Four grants to individual artists to recognize and reward their artistic achievements. These were announced in July 2018 after approval by the SCAC Board of Directors. Quarterly Project Support: $5,200 (1st quarter only) Six grants to support a variety of quality arts projects and programs and/or for professional development opportunities to assist artistic and managerial staff. This category also supports specific arts activities that promote an individual artist's professional development or career advancement. This program is funded in part by an award from the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of The Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.