News

Laurel & Milly

Add your event to Arts Daily!

The South Carolina Arts Commission's arts calendar, Arts Daily, has joined forces with The Hub. Now you can visit one place to view or submit arts news AND events! Long-time Arts Daily users will notice that the revamped event submission process is simpler. You can also add your arts venue (if you haven't already) to The Hub's venue list through the Arts Daily submission process. Online readers of Arts Daily can search and sort events to find activities based on location, art form or type of event. Is your event or opportunity right for Arts Daily? If it's arts-related, open to the public, and of interest to people in South Carolina, then yes! Event types include auditions, calls for entries & contests, classes, conferences, exhibitions, fellowships & residencies, openings, book signings, performances, screenings and more. You'll choose the type when you submit your event or opportunity. To submit arts events to Arts Daily, use the Submit Events button. (Be sure to submit your event at least one month in advance.) If your event has an interesting news element, you can also send it to The Hub through the Submit Story button. Arts events submitted at least one month in advance will appear on the Arts Daily website, and some will be recorded for radio.

How to decide what to submit where

Submit Event to Arts Daily: Arts Daily listings and radio announcements are limited to the key details and a brief description of your event and will direct readers to your website or organization for a lengthier description. Arts events submitted at least one month before the event will be posted to the online Arts Daily calendar. Not all events are recorded for the radio. The earlier you submit, the longer it will appear on the Arts Daily site for readers to find and the better chance the event will be recorded for radio. You can even submit an entire season at once! Submit Story to The Hub: If your event has a news component, you can also submit a lengthier article or news release through The Hub's Submit Story button. Story submissions, if accepted, appear as articles on The Hub's main page and "roll off" the page as other articles are posted -- the lifespan of a Hub article is much shorter than an Arts Daily entry. Hub articles will direct readers to your website or organization for more information. What makes an event newsworthy? A few questions to ask: Does the event relate to a larger purpose (e.g., an artist's studio or gallery opening is a result of the arts reviving a downtown, a celebrity S.C. artist is participating to raise awareness and/or funds, a student exhibition illustrates the benefit of arts education, etc.)? Is this a first time for the event, or a milestone anniversary? Did the project break an attendance or fundraising record? Sometimes the news element occurs after an event when you're ready to share results and photos. Bottom line: Submit ALL arts events to Arts Daily, at least one month in advance. Submit more info about your event to The Hub ONLY if there is an extra news element. Remember, you may also use the Submit Story button to send your feature articles, blog posts, stories, etc. about arts topics other than events.

Writing your Arts Daily Event Description

Arts Daily web listings and radio announcements are designed to provide the most vital pieces of information about your event or opportunity and refer users to ArtsDaily.org and/or to your website or organization for details. We encourage you to use your Event Description space to provide a self-contained, factual summary of your event or opportunity. ONLY the text in the Event Description field will be used in your radio announcement, should your submission be chosen for broadcast. What to include in the Event Description:
  • The name of the event or opportunity and a brief description of it
  • Who is responsible for it (hosting or presenting organization)
  • Where (venue and city)
  • When (date and time)
  • Cost to participate
  • Deadline for the public to participate (e.g., registration, submission), if applicable. (Note: This is not a deadline for posting on Arts Daily.)
What not to include in the Event Description:
  • Contact information. Radio announcements will direct listeners to the Arts Daily website where you have entered this information.
  • Superlatives (such as “the best,” “beautiful,” “a great achievement,” etc.) will be excluded from the final listing.
Want a template? Try this: (Name of the presenting or host organization) presents (name of the event), (event date) at (event time), at (event venue) in (city, and state if not South Carolina). (Provide a description of the event, so that Arts Daily users will understand what it is and whether or not they would like to attend.) Tickets are (cost). (Provide registration and/or submission requirements and/or deadline, if applicable.) Questions? We're happy to help. Contact us here. About Arts Daily Arts Daily is a partnership between the South Carolina Arts Commission, South Carolina ETV Radio, and the College of Charleston.

Arts News

Sandlapper Singers co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush announces retirement

Lillian QuackenbushThe Sandlapper Singers of Columbia have announced that artistic director and co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush will retire at the end of the 2016 season. The transition begins with the hiring of a general manager for the organization in 2014. The search for a new artistic director begins in January 2015 with the goal of selecting three candidates by summer 2015. These three candidates will each be asked to join Dr. Quackenbush to prepare and conduct the chorus on one of the three series concerts in the 2015-2016 season. The candidate chosen will join the organization in July 2016. About The Sandlapper Singers Sandlapper Singers The Sandlapper Singers, South Carolina’s premier professional chorus, was established in 1996 by Lillian and Dave Quackenbush and has presented American music in a uniquely entertaining and engaging style since that time. The 34-voice auditioned ensemble is currently in its 19th season, performing an annual subscription series in the Columbia area. The Singers also presents additional performances each year in communities across the state of South Carolina and the Southeast and has performed overseas. The group is directed and conducted by co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush, retired chairman of the Columbia College music department and recipient of the 2012 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor's Award for Life Time Achievement in the Arts, sponsored by the South Carolina Arts Commission. The Singers focus on the works of American composers past and present, a departure from the usual programming of European choral literature, offering a delightful mix of both familiar and new musical sounds. The organization has established a strongly supported educational program with the Young Sandlapper Singers, the Katie Quackenbush Vocal Scholarship for high school students, and a Side-By-Side program for high school choral ensembles -- the next generation of Sandlapper Singers!

Jobs

Elementary Dance Teacher Vacancy

East Aiken School of the Arts in Aiken, SC is seeking a dance teacher with a dance education degree for the 2014-2015 school year. East Aiken School of the Arts is a fast-growing arts integration school serving students in grades 5k-5th. Apply online through the Aiken County Public School District website (click the "Job Opportunities" tab at the top of the page) or by contacting Heather Driver in Human Resources at 803-641-2463 or applicants@acpsd.net. The salary schedule is also located under the website's Job Opportunities tab.

Recognition

Milly

All it takes is a letter! Verner Awards nomination process simplified

The Verner Awards statue We've simplified the nomination process for the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts! It's easier than ever - all it takes is a letter.  Just e-mail, mail or hand deliver a letter of nomination by Nov. 3. The standards are still high -- the award recognizes outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina -- but the nomination process is streamlined. Help recognize South Carolina innovators, supporters and advocates of the arts with a nomination for the state's highest arts award! Nominations are accepted in these categories:

  • ARTS IN EDUCATION – open to S.C. individuals and institutions whose primary function is arts education. May include arts educators (teachers, consultants, principals, administrators), schools, school districts, college/university arts departments, etc.
  • ORGANIZATION – open to S.C. organizations that contribute to the advancement and/or support of the arts. May include arts discipline organizations, arts councils, arts advocacy groups, guilds, arts departments of organizations, educational institutions, etc.
  • GOVERNMENT – open to S.C. agencies and institutions generally described as units of state, county or municipal governments that have served their communities in outstanding ways through the arts, OR elected or appointed officials who, in their official capacities, have demonstrated notable support for the arts through leadership and public policy.
  • BUSINESS/FOUNDATION – open to SC individuals, or companies and foundations whose participation, support, and/or contributions have benefited the maintenance and growth of the arts.
  • INDIVIDUAL – open to S.C. individuals who have demonstrated exceptional achievement and statewide impact through their leadership, support, and advancement of the arts. May include arts professionals such as managers, administrators; or arts supporters such as patrons, promoters, donors, etc.
  • INDIVIDUAL ARTIST – open to S.C. artists of exceptional talent and creativity, in any discipline, whose contribution to the arts has helped guide and influence directions, trends and aesthetic practices across the state or to national or international levels
Find complete nomination guidelines online. Image: A hand-crafted bronze statue, designed by artist Jean McWhorter, is presented to each recipient.

Grantee Spotlight

Spartanburg Art Museum receives national support from the American Alliance of Museums

This fall the Spartanburg Art Museum will take part in the Museum Assessment Program (MAP) created in collaboration between the American Alliance of Museums and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). “This is tremendous news for SAM,"said Elizabeth Goddard, executive director. “I have worked with both of these organizations in the past and feel very fortunate to have another opportunity to bring national standards of excellence to the work SAM is striving to accomplish.” The American Alliance of Museums mission is to nurture excellence in museums through advocacy and service. MAP: A Customized Roadmap for Improvement is a powerful tool designed to support museums of all sizes through a one-year process of self-assessment, institutional activities and consultative peer review. At the end of this process SAM will emerge with an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses and opportunities and a prioritized road map for improving operations and meeting standards. For the past 30 years, the MAP program has assisted more than 4,500 museums in strengthening operations, planning for the future and meeting standards. The IMLS-funded MAP grants provide $4,000 worth of consultative resources and services. “What these means specifically for SAM is a year of access to an online community with years of expertise rooted in national best practices, peer reviews, free webinars, national recognition, and a site visit, all designed to emphasize strategic planning and ensuring operations and resource alignment with our evolving mission," said Goddard. “This process will involve the staff and board of directors as we increase our knowledge together and improve our operations and build capacity for all of core components.” This is a pivotal time for the museum. Goddard is approaching the one-year mark as executive director, and the board of directors just welcomed new members Ryan Langley, Kerin Hannah, Sharon Butehorn, Cathy Bagwell, Epsie Coleman and Mary Ann Kotlarich. George Nixon, board president, is excited for SAM’s future, writing in a recent blog post: “SAM is helping us think – about ourselves and the world around us. Interactive places encourage children of all ages to experience art in non-traditional ways." SAM has a full fall season planned of new exhibitions, Art School classes and outreach sites serving youth throughout Spartanburg County during after school hours with the COLORS program. For more information, visit spartanburgartmuseum.org or call (864) 582-7616.

News

Charleston’s theater scene: keeping stage lights on a financial balancing act

From the Charleston City Paper:

Last month, a Summerville town councilman made waves in the local theater scene by trying to remove about $3,000 in funds directed to the Flowertown Players. He objected to the content of their 2013 production of the musical, Rent. But while his efforts to remove the accommodation tax funding failed, his actions beg the question: How much would the loss of $3,000 in funding affect a local theater? How much would it really hurt? To answer the question, we need a general picture of the economics of our local theaters and, to tell the truth, the picture changes from troupe to troupe — albeit slightly. We have theaters like Charleston Stage that pay upward of $250,000 per show, and we have smaller theaters like PURE Theatre or What If? that can keep production costs to under $20,000. To a larger theater, perhaps, $3,000 is a drop in the bucket, but no matter what, public funding is a big piece of the glue holding our theater community together. When it gets taken away, that money has to be found somewhere else in order for our theaters to thrive. Emily Wilhoit is the executive director of Theatre Charleston, an alliance of over a dozen local theaters. As such, she knows what's up, financially speaking. "The average nonprofit theater arts group budget income comes only from 50 percent tickets. The other 50 percent comes from grants, donations, and sponsorships," she says. Though those numbers can and do vary greatly. "All our theaters very much rely on grants, contributions, and sponsorships to run their seasons." Julian Wiles, founder and producing artistic director of Charleston Stage, arguably Charleston's largest theatrical group, agrees. "Ticket sales only make up about 47 percent of Charleston Stage's production costs. Without sponsors, donors, and public arts funding, Charleston Stage shows would all post a loss," he says. Smaller theaters, too, face the same challenge. At the PURE Theatre, a 100-seat blackbox, the numbers are closer to 54 percent tickets, 46 percent contributions, according to Managing Director Laurens Wilson. All our theaters, it seems, are reliant in large measure on funding received from methods other than ticket sales. So where does all that money go? Again, it varies greatly by theater and their season. At Charleston Stage, which is known for huge musical productions the money seems to flow to its employees. "The biggest costs are people. Although we use the most modern tools such as computers for sound, lights, set design, etc., theater is still very much a hand-made business and requires a lot of hands," says Wiles. "Over the course of a season we employ over 150 musicians, actors, directors, stage hands, choreographers, music directors, and production staff, costumers, scenery, lighting and sound designers, and technicians. As a professional theater all of these artists receive paid compensation." And then there's the royalty fee, which is the money paid for the right to be able to use a copyrighted script. "Royalties range from 10 percent to 13 percent of the gross," continues Wiles. "And royalties generally have to be paid in full before a single ticket is sold, so we are always taking a bit of a chance. For some shows we pay in excess of $30,000 for royalties." Over at PURE, things look similar, though on a smaller scale. Wilson says, "The biggest expense we have are artists. A show that has 10 actors is going to be more expensive than a show with two. If you look at the hard cost of the show alone, you're probably looking at around $15,000. That doesn't include staff salaries that would be applicable to the show." As Wiles said, it's a risk, every time. But are directors taking that into account, and only choosing shows that they think will sell well? You'd think so, but that's not always the case. Take PURE, a theater known for taking risks. Artistic Director Sharon Graci and the theater's board like to try all kinds of different plays. "Whether or not a show will be well-attended comes into consideration for sure," says Graci. "And we may make some adjustments to our season as a whole, knowing we're doing a show that won't be as accessible as another show. But it will never dictate our artistic selections." Some shows do better than expected. Russian Transport, PURE's February comedy about a Russian-Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn attempting to live a perfect American life until uncle Boris arrives and upsets the balance, is one example. The play brought in far more in ticket sales than anticipated. However, other productions don't measure up, so theater directors make sure to plan each season carefully to at least average out. With ticket sales an unreliable form of income, the public funding and donor contributions become ever more important. Thus, the answer to our original question — How much would it hurt to lose $3,000 in public funding? — seems clear, at least to Wilson. "$3,000 would be impactful for anyone. We all fight for every dollar we get," she says. "In a market like Charleston, the pool of contributed income is limited. If you have something you're counting on like city money, and it goes away, it's often hard to go away and replace it."
Via: Charleston City Paper

Conferences

South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education conference set for October

The South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education is hosting its annual Arts Integration Conference Oct. 2 and 3 in Columbia at the Marriott, located at 1200 Hampton St.

For the past 12 years, SCAAE’s annual professional development conference has provided educators with an opportunity to learn how the arts effectively engage students. This year’s conference, The Arts Initiate Learning, will include sessions that address the role of arts integration in 2014’s biggest initiatives, including Common Core, Educator Evaluation, Student Assessment, the new Core Arts Standards, STEAM and Read to Succeed (Literacy Development).

Keynote speaker Lynn Tuttle is director of arts education at the Arizona Department of Education. Her duties include acting as a liaison to the state’s arts educators; providing professional development in Arizona’s Academic Arts Standards, arts assessment and arts integration; and promoting quality arts education programs in Arizona’s schools. She co-chaired the Arizona Arts Education Census Committee, which published the 2010 Arizona Arts Education Census, documenting access and availability of arts education in Arizona’s district and charter schools. She has keynoted for The Kennedy Center’s 2013 Partners in Education conference and the 2013 Biannual Maine Arts Education Conference, and has presented for Americans for the Arts, Arts Education Partnership, the Educational Theatre Association, the Kennedy Center Alliances for Arts Education Network, and other organizations.

An early-bird registration rate is available until Aug. 29. For more information or to register, visit the SCAAE's website.

Via: South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education

News

City of North Charleston welcomes new artist-in-residence

AlexandraRoberts_NCAIR14-15The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department has appointed mixed media artist Alexandra Roberts as Artist-in-Residence for 2014-2015. The City’s Artist-in-Residence serves as a key resource for the department’s outreach programs, especially in the area of art instruction, by providing services to senior groups, public schools, group homes, and other groups within North Charleston city limits. Roberts will be available for visual art residencies of 12-15 hours at a minimum of two-hour increments at North Charleston schools and is also available to host workshops for community groups of all ages. Born in Virginia, Roberts moved to South Carolina as a child. Visual art has always been a major part of her life; she participated in various art clubs and advanced art programs throughout her early education. As a high school junior, she was accepted into the prestigious Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville, S.C. Roberts graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) with a BFA in Fine Arts in 2006 and immediately pursued the career she is most passionate about, community arts, by obtaining an MA in Community Arts in 2007. Through MICA’s Community Arts Partnership (CAP) program, she had the opportunity to teach art and promote community involvement to young people in the Better Waverly Community in Baltimore, Md. Currently, Roberts is a freelance artist and art instructor with the Casey Community Center in Goose Creek. She is also a teaching artist with the City of North Charleston’s After School Arts Enrichment Program and served as the 2014 North Charleston Arts Festival’s resident artist to create a sculpture with students at the Persephone Moultrie Community Center. She enjoys sharing her passion for art with students of all ages, and her classes consist of working with a variety of materials, such as papers, paint, ink, and much more. Robert’s art is an exploration of media culminating in a symphony of color and texture, with much of her work inspired by personal experiences, observations in society, and her work as a community artist. The North Charleston City Gallery will host an exhibition of Robert’s work throughout January 2015. The gallery is located within the Charleston Area Convention Center at 5001 Coliseum Drive in North Charleston. School liaisons, arts teachers, and the general public are invited to meet the artist at a free gallery reception on Thursday, January 8, 2015, from 5-7 pm. Art teachers and school liaisons may initiate the request for FREE services by the Artist-in-Residence by contacting the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at (843)740-5851. Community groups are also welcome to submit requests, which will be considered on a first come first served basis. All project requests should be placed at least two weeks in advance, with residences completed by the end of May 2015. More information about the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department’s Artist-in-Residence program, as well as the department’s other programs, exhibits, and events, can be found on the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website. Image: Zophia (detail) Via: North Charleston Cultural Arts Department

Conferences

Sessions for everyone at the Statewide Arts Conference!

Update: Richard Evans' session (mentioned below) is now full. Conference registrants will receive information about the waiting list. The Statewide Arts Conference taking place Sept. 18 at the Columbia Conference Center is chock full of opportunities to learn from experts and network with colleagues. For less than $100, you'll have access to the kind of high-quality professional development usually found at regional and national conferences -- and you don't even have to leave the state! old cell phonesThe conference features not one, but two highly sought-after keynote speakers. National Book Award-winning poet and S.C. native Nikky Finney will kick off the conference, and Richard Evans of EmcArts will talk about adaptive change and innovation during lunch. Richard will also present a daylong session targeted at arts organizations and the complex changes we're facing. Space is limited in this interactive session and seats are going fast; everyone who registers for the conference will receive details about signing up for Richard's session. Registration is just $98 per person, or $88 per person if you and a colleague register at the same time. Session highlights (find complete details online.) For artists:

  • Making Your Life as an Artist: A Guide to a Balance, Sustainable Artistic Life
  • Practical Legal Tips for the Creative Person
  • A Life in the Arts: 10 Big Ideas on Career and Financial Success
  • Roundtable discussions/short sessions with Artists U facilitators
For everyone:
  • Creating and Cultivating the Agriculture and Art in Your Community
  • The Arts and Social Change
  • Creativity + Community: Leveraging Change for Good
  • Developing Community Partnerships for Arts Education
  • Everyone Tells Our Story But Us - Toward Authenticity in Artistic Presentations
  • Now Tweet This: Online Marketing is Here to Stay
  • Accessibility and New Audiences
Plus, explore program and funding opportunities from South Arts and the Humanities CouncilSC and get technology assistance through our curbside consultant. Read more details about the sessions and register today!

News

S.C. Philharmonic “kick starts” fundraiser to commission unique concerto

A Kickstarter fundraising campaign lets “little guy” donors help the South Carolina Philharmonic commission a unique concerto to premiere at its March 14, 2015, Masterworks concert. Dan ViscontiAmerican composer Dan Visconti (right) is currently composing Beatbox, the first concerto to pair a full orchestra with a string quintet. Classical music rock stars Sybarite5 (above) team with the S.C. Phil and Music Director Morihiko Nakahara for the work’s world premiere. Rather than seek a corporate or wealthy, individual donor to make Beatbox a reality, the S.C. Phil is using Kickstarter.com to empower non-traditional donors – from every-day patrons to the community at large – to pool smaller donations and fund a portion of the non-traditional new work. Donations ranging from just $1 to $1,200 can help raise $5,000 to go toward the often-prohibitive cost of commissioning new music. The catch with Kickstarter is that the S.C. Phil has just 30 days to raise the full $5,000 goal – or else get nothing at all. “While the S.C. Phil supports contemporary American composers and would like to participate in commissions and consortiums more often, the costs involved are in addition to those of putting a performance on stage,” S.C. Phil Executive Director Rhonda Hunsinger said. “With Visconti, we are also bringing in a critically acclaimed string quintet, which involves additional fees, transportation and lodging. We are able to raise a portion of this through traditional fundraising, but need new sources of support to cover the full cost of this endeavor.” Beatbox is to combine Visconti’s classical/bluegrass/rock style with Sybarite5, who are characterized by their unique style and virtuosity. Visconti and Sybarite5 have worked together before, and while this piece promises to have a folk music influence from Visconti's Virginia upbringing, it is being written specifically for Sybarite5 and will capture the group's energy and musical spirit. The Duluth Superior Orchestra (Minn.) and Midland Symphony Orchestra (Mich.) are joining the S.C. Phil in the commissioning consortium. Visit the Kickstarter campaign page for more information. Via: South Carolina Philharmonic