Grants Roundup: Deadlines for the Week of July 16

Though far from the only thing, grants are certainly among the main things we do here. And because of their importance in our work, and what they mean to so many of you, The Hub wants to help keep Arts Commission grants top-of-mind and reduce the instances of people telling us, "If only we'd known about X grant!" We can't reach everybody, but we can try. On Mondays with deadlines on the horizon, "Grants Roundup" highlights first what grants are due that week and then includes what's coming later in increments.


GrantsThis week

These are to serve mainly as final reminders. Most grant applications simply cannot be undertaken well in this short a time frame. Consult your county or discipline coordinator with questions!
  • n/a

Next week

  • n/a

Next 30(ish)

Important Notes

  • You are encouraged to also consult the SCAC deadline page for up-to-date information on all grant deadlines (subject to change) and deadlines for non-grant programs.
  • For next steps, grant guidance, and more information, consult:
    • your county coordinator if you represent local organizations, businesses, or educational institutions, or
    • your discipline coordinator if you're an individual artist or serve the statewide population.

‘Chicken Man’ loves what he does

“You gotta love it, you gotta love what you do.” That from renowned Columbia artist Ernest Lee, known to most as the "Chicken Man" for his iconic artwork featuring ... well, you know. He's going strong 51 years into his art career. “When I was five, I started drawing. And I told my mom if there was anything in the world I wanted to be, I wanted to be an artist,” he said. “I just picked up the pencil and kept playing with it.” When he got older, Lee began painting the interior and exterior of houses, until someone suggested he start doing “something he could call his own.” We posit that he did. Read more on Lee's story on ColaDaily.com.  

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Wheel Sessions: Greenville’s Underground Jazz Series

“Wheel Sessions” is a jazz performance series in Greenville with performances for an intimate listening audience on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. The concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. The first 41 Wheel Sessions were held at their namesake venue, the Wheel, a shared arts space in West Greenville’s Arts District. Wheel Sessions host and resident drummer Kevin Korschgen transformed that location, filled with funky comfortable furniture, into a “groovy” underground jazz club not unlike one you might find in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Set as theater in the round, that intimate space played an important role in establishing a unique Wheel Session brand. However, the true success of the sessions is in the music! Sadly, the Wheel no longer exists – but the sessions continue to thrive. The Wheel Sessions enjoy an enthusiastic and supportive fan base. Whether billed as a House Party, held in a local club, or in its soon to be home, the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (GUUF), the Wheel Sessions are a must see and hear event. Mr. Korschgen consistently books many of the Carolina’s finest jazz musicians for the sessions, extending them complete artistic license to perform as if they where in Village. Until you have attended a Wheel Session it is hard to imagine such creative jazz brewing in the Upstate. For information on upcoming shows, visit wheelsessions.com.


Next event

Wheel Session 48 Thursday, July 26, 2018 Justin Ray Quartet 7:30-9:30 p.m. … doors open at 7 p.m. Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Rd., Greenville, SC 29609 Admission $15 (Cash only) To reserve a seat, phone or text 312.520.2760 or email Kevin at kmkorschgen@gmail.com.
Header photo by Chevanon Photography from Pexels

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Artists wanted for the Art Walk of Lexington

Application deadline: Aug. 1, 2018


The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone. GRC is excited to bring the Art Walk of Lexington to beautiful downtown Lexington. The event is scheduled for Sept. 22, 2018 at the Icehouse Amphitheatre from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. The Art Walk will allow local artisans from Lexington, Columbia and surrounding communities the opportunity to showcase and sell their creations to the public. Additionally, as a cultural event, the Art Walk will provide the community an opportunity to enjoy local cuisine and interact with artists while viewing their works. Registration is currently open for artists interested in participating. Eligible categories include:
  • Painting,
  • Drawing,
  • Photography,
  • Sculpture,
  • Jewelry,
  • Mixed Media,
  • Graphic/Printmaking,
  • Ceramics,
  • Woodwork,
  • Metalwork,
  • Up-cycled,
  • and Digital Image.
All works displayed must but be original creations and available for sale. Visit artwalksc.org to complete the artist application and secure a spot. Proceeds from the Art Walk will benefit GRC, a local non-profit, and will help fulfill its mission of Enabling Global Workers to THRIVE!

Three artists to develop businesses with new SCAC grants

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 12 July 2018 COLUMBIA, S.C. – The South Carolina Arts Commission continues its commitment to helping the state’s artists build or bolster sustainable arts careers by awarding three Artists’ Ventures Initiative (AVI) grants for FY2019. AVI grants encourage and enable the creation of new artist-driven, arts-based business ventures that will provide career satisfaction and sustainability for S.C. artists. Grants can be used to launch a new venture or significantly alter an existing venture. A total of $15,000 will be distributed evenly to three artists who were among 21 who applied for the grants:

  • Serwah Armah-Koranteng, Richland County;
  • Shauna Cooper, Orangeburg County;
  • Darin Gehrke, Greenville County.
Armah-Koranteng, a fashion designer, plans to use her grant to purchase a truck that will be turned into a sewing training center and mobile boutique – “the first authentic African clothing boutique on wheels in the Carolinas,” she said. “This has been my dream for the past four years of being in business, and I am just steps away from achieving it. Africstyle mobile boutique will be able to continue with its event planning activities, increase its pop-up store opportunities in major cities, and help teach basic sewing skills to customers who visit our boutique.” Cooper, who specializes in hand-molded, artisan-style candles, is owner and creative director of home fragrance and body care products company Wicks + Scents. She plans to use her award to build brand awareness with a mobile-responsive and navigation-friendly website with SEO optimization and purchase of commercial-grade equipment to increase the business’ scalability. Gehrke, a potter, will use grant funds to purchase a pug mill, a piece of equipment that will increase studio efficiency by recycling clay more quickly and thoroughly. It will also improve his studio environment by reducing dust and minimizing the physical stress of preparing clay. “The South Carolina Arts Commission commends these artist entrepreneurs on excellent pitches to our panel that sold their ideas. They contribute to an arts-related economic cluster which adds $9.7 billion to our state economy annually, and these transformative grants are to promote sustainability of these businesses,” said Executive Director Ken May of the arts commission. Beginning this fall, the S.C. Arts Commission will make a call for applicants for the next year’s grant awards. More information is available at SouthCarolinaArts.com or by calling 803.734.8696.
ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISSION The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

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Furman tenors shine at national competition in Las Vegas

After impressive performances at both state and regional National Association of Teachers of Singing (NATS) competitions held earlier this year, two Furman University vocalists made the best of opportunities to compete on the national stage. Tyrese Byrd, a junior vocal performance major from Williamston and Bergsvein Toverud, a senior music education major from Lenoir, N.C., competed in the semifinals and finals of the National Student Auditions, part of the 55th NATS competition held June 22-26 in Las Vegas. The tenors won third place in their divisions at the event where they competed among 200 vocalists. Before getting a chance to compete in the semis, the two were required to submit YouTube videos for the preliminary round. (View them here: Toverud | Byrd)  Having made the cut, which included the top 14 in their respective divisions, the tenors matriculated to the live semifinal round where they continued to shine. Only the top three or four singers in each category from the semifinals advanced to the live, national final. “Tyrese and Bergsvein were the only two tenors competing in the college classical competition at this level. This is remarkable considering the size of our music program. It says a lot about the type of student and level of talent we have here, ” Furman Professor of Voice Grant Knox said. Knox believes no other school came away with two finalists at the competition. And besides acknowledging the raw talent students brought to the event, Knox gives a nod to Furman. “These types of successes would not be possible without Furman’s support and encouragement. These students come to Furman because they feel the university values music and the arts. I look forward to celebrating more achievements like these in the years to come,” he said.


For more information, contact Grant Knox at 864.294.3034 and grant.knox@furman.edu.

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North Charleston presents Summer Children’s Theatre performances on July 13

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to offer the second part of its two-part Summer Children’s Theatre series on Friday, July 13, 2018, featuring "Music of the Caribbean" performed by Pantasia Steel Band. The program is for all ages and features two showings at two different locations. Daycares, community groups, families, and individuals are welcome to attend the 10 a.m. showing at Northwoods Park and Recreation Center at 8348 Greenridge Rd. and/or the 2 p.m. showing at Danny Jones Recreation Center at 1455 Monitor St. in North Charleston. Tickets are $2 per child with accompanying adults admitted at no charge. Parking is free. "Music of the Caribbean" is a fast-paced musical program featuring a mix of calypso music, soca, and reggae selections. Audience members will learn about steel drums, the history of Caribbean music, and how a steel drum is made. Pantasia will also offer a musical demonstration tracing the evolution of the steel drum from early times of tamboo bamboo to the modern-day steel drum. This "feel-good" performance is full of lots of in-seat audience participation and is designed for all ages. "Music of the Caribbean" is the final presentation of North Charleston’s Summer Children’s Theatre Series. Groups of 10 or more are asked to reserve space in advance. Seats fill up fast, so reserve early by calling the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department office at 843.740.5854. For reservation forms, directions, or information on additional programs and events, visit the Arts & Culture section of NorthCharleston.org.


Pantasia Steel Band was formed in 1994 by three musicians with a love for steel drums, a passion for performing, and a desire to provide quality, professional entertainment. Over the past 20 years the band has performed for hundreds of events, focusing on those held in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, with an occasional trek to neighboring portions of Virginia, Tennessee, and Florida. The types of events they perform for is limitless, including weddings, rehearsal dinners, trade shows, conventions, corporate events, festivals, grand openings, family reunions, parties, and school assemblies. For more information about the band, visit pantasiasteelband.com.

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South Arts grants support “Southern Creative Places”

South Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization serving nine Southern states, has announced $78,189 in grants to 18 communities in the region. South Arts LogoThese grants, made possible through funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Georgia Council for the Arts, support the planning and execution of creative placemaking projects predominantly in small and rural communities in the South. “Creative placemaking uses arts and culture to activate and animate communities,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “Creative placemaking puts arts, culture and creativity at the center of planning and problem-solving. It brings people and partners together to design creative solutions to community challenges using arts and culture as catalysts. The results can be more connected communities, enhanced quality of life, more economic opportunities, and the showcasing of a community’s most unique characteristics.” The grants, which must be matched by the recipient organization, support organizations in South Arts’ region. Organizations applied this spring and were recently notified of their status. “In our new strategic plan, South Arts has made a commitment to address the evolving needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs,” continued Surkamer. “Supporting these creative placemaking efforts – from a small-business incubator for creative entrepreneurs to public art projects embracing civic pride and even a project using the arts to promote healthy eating and locally-grown produce – is an important step in serving the cross-sector needs of our region through the arts.” The Southern Creative Places grant program represents South Arts’ first programmatic offering in the arena of creative placemaking, following up on its successful co-sponsorship of the Creative Placemaking Leadership Summit in March 2018 in Chattanooga. For more information about opportunities from South Arts, visit www.southarts.org.


About South Arts South Arts advances Southern vitality through the arts. The nonprofit regional arts organization was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to support the success of artists and arts providers in the South, address the needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs, and celebrate the excellence, innovation, value and power of the arts of the South. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.
S.C. Grant Recipients
  • The Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg received a $5,000 grant to establish a cultural center in the majority Hispanic community of Arcadia.
  • The City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs received a $5,000 grant to implement the conNECKted Too project, pairing artists with tiny businesses in an isolated part of Charleston.
  • Fresh Future Farm, Inc. in Charleston received a $3,038 grant for a community mural project celebrating community history and promoting healthy, locally-grown foods.
  • The Holly Springs Center in Pickens received a $4,365 grant to present a festival of Appalachian arts on the grounds of a former school.
  • The Town of Estill received a $3,375 grant to create a mural celebrating diversity.

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Apply to be Richland Library’s next Artist-in-Residence

Richland Library is taking applications for fall 2018, spring 2019, and summer 2019 artist-in-residence positions. The application deadline is July 15. If you, or someone you know, is an artist, please consider this unique opportunity. The library is looking for artists spanning: • traditional/fine art • performance • installation • sculpture • filmmaking • musical • mixed media Initially developed in September 2016, the concept behind Richland Library's artist-in-residence is to connect the community with local, working artists and to provide creative and educational opportunities to local residents in a way that supports cultural and artistic exchange. Hear from our past artists-in-residence and their time at the library by visiting here: http://www.richlandlibrary.com/inform/artist-residence-applications-are-open If you’re interested in becoming an artist-in-residence, please fill out an application here: http://www.richlandlibrary.com/artist-residence-application The deadline to apply is midnight, Sunday, July 15. Do you have questions? Please contact Richland Library Arts Librarian Ashley Warthen at awarthen@richlandlibrary.com.

Tuning Up: Unique new exhibition + financial management training

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


A thin blue line ... on canvas? Columbia Police Department employees are showing off their artistic talents in a new exhibition at the Columbia City Hall Art Gallery (from Cola Daily). Work from 15 employees is on display Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 1737 Main St. in Columbia through Sept. 26. Free. ICYMI: A Stronger Bottom Line. The S.C. Arts Alliance – with funding help provided by the SCAC and the Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation – is announcing a new training program to help organizations and their leadership teams become even stronger in financial management. It is open to all SCAC organizational grantees with budgets between $200,000-$750,000. This program will provide participating organizations with tailored assistance to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of financial operations. And while it's valued at $3,500 per organization, thanks to the funding assistance mentioned above it is available for just $200. (Not a typo; we checked. - Ed.) All training takes place in Charleston. It is an exceptional resource for those who need it, and many do. Find out more now!
Arts funding clarification. You might have noticed that on Friday The Hub and SCAC social media outlets ran posts thanking Gov. McMaster and the S.C. General Assembly for the former not issuing vetoes to the latter's increased funding for SCAC grants and arts education initiatives. It was a welcome and energizing, if not pleasantly surprising, break from the norm. You might also have noticed the governor did issue a veto to $500,000 "for" the SCAC that was actually for the S.C. Children's Theatre in Greenville. So how do we reconcile saying we're grateful to have been spared by the veto pen while that $500,000 was vetoed? Because the money in question, which originated in the House, was requested by a legislator on behalf of the theatre. Our agency was simply to be what's known as a "pass-through." House rules allow for legislators to request funds on behalf of private entities. If included in the budget and approved by the Senate and governor, the funds must be sent through a relevant state agency which did not request the funding before being disbursed to the recipient.