News

Laurel & Milly

Add your event to Arts Daily!

The South Carolina Arts Commission's arts calendar, Arts Daily, has joined forces with The Hub. Now you can visit one place to view or submit arts news AND events! Long-time Arts Daily users will notice that the revamped event submission process is simpler. You can also add your arts venue (if you haven't already) to The Hub's venue list through the Arts Daily submission process. Online readers of Arts Daily can search and sort events to find activities based on location, art form or type of event. Is your event or opportunity right for Arts Daily? If it's arts-related, open to the public, and of interest to people in South Carolina, then yes! Event types include auditions, calls for entries & contests, classes, conferences, exhibitions, fellowships & residencies, openings, book signings, performances, screenings and more. You'll choose the type when you submit your event or opportunity. To submit arts events to Arts Daily, use the Submit Events button. (Be sure to submit your event at least one month in advance.) If your event has an interesting news element, you can also send it to The Hub through the Submit Story button. Arts events submitted at least one month in advance will appear on the Arts Daily website, and some will be recorded for radio.

How to decide what to submit where

Submit Event to Arts Daily: Arts Daily listings and radio announcements are limited to the key details and a brief description of your event and will direct readers to your website or organization for a lengthier description. Arts events submitted at least one month before the event will be posted to the online Arts Daily calendar. Not all events are recorded for the radio. The earlier you submit, the longer it will appear on the Arts Daily site for readers to find and the better chance the event will be recorded for radio. You can even submit an entire season at once! Submit Story to The Hub: If your event has a news component, you can also submit a lengthier article or news release through The Hub's Submit Story button. Story submissions, if accepted, appear as articles on The Hub's main page and "roll off" the page as other articles are posted -- the lifespan of a Hub article is much shorter than an Arts Daily entry. Hub articles will direct readers to your website or organization for more information. What makes an event newsworthy? A few questions to ask: Does the event relate to a larger purpose (e.g., an artist's studio or gallery opening is a result of the arts reviving a downtown, a celebrity S.C. artist is participating to raise awareness and/or funds, a student exhibition illustrates the benefit of arts education, etc.)? Is this a first time for the event, or a milestone anniversary? Did the project break an attendance or fundraising record? Sometimes the news element occurs after an event when you're ready to share results and photos. Bottom line: Submit ALL arts events to Arts Daily, at least one month in advance. Submit more info about your event to The Hub ONLY if there is an extra news element. Remember, you may also use the Submit Story button to send your feature articles, blog posts, stories, etc. about arts topics other than events.

Writing your Arts Daily Event Description

Arts Daily web listings and radio announcements are designed to provide the most vital pieces of information about your event or opportunity and refer users to ArtsDaily.org and/or to your website or organization for details. We encourage you to use your Event Description space to provide a self-contained, factual summary of your event or opportunity. ONLY the text in the Event Description field will be used in your radio announcement, should your submission be chosen for broadcast. What to include in the Event Description:
  • The name of the event or opportunity and a brief description of it
  • Who is responsible for it (hosting or presenting organization)
  • Where (venue and city)
  • When (date and time)
  • Cost to participate
  • Deadline for the public to participate (e.g., registration, submission), if applicable. (Note: This is not a deadline for posting on Arts Daily.)
What not to include in the Event Description:
  • Contact information. Radio announcements will direct listeners to the Arts Daily website where you have entered this information.
  • Superlatives (such as “the best,” “beautiful,” “a great achievement,” etc.) will be excluded from the final listing.
Want a template? Try this: (Name of the presenting or host organization) presents (name of the event), (event date) at (event time), at (event venue) in (city, and state if not South Carolina). (Provide a description of the event, so that Arts Daily users will understand what it is and whether or not they would like to attend.) Tickets are (cost). (Provide registration and/or submission requirements and/or deadline, if applicable.) Questions? We're happy to help. Contact us here. About Arts Daily Arts Daily is a partnership between the South Carolina Arts Commission, South Carolina ETV Radio, and the College of Charleston.

News

Charleston’s theater scene: keeping stage lights on a financial balancing act

From the Charleston City Paper:

Last month, a Summerville town councilman made waves in the local theater scene by trying to remove about $3,000 in funds directed to the Flowertown Players. He objected to the content of their 2013 production of the musical, Rent. But while his efforts to remove the accommodation tax funding failed, his actions beg the question: How much would the loss of $3,000 in funding affect a local theater? How much would it really hurt? To answer the question, we need a general picture of the economics of our local theaters and, to tell the truth, the picture changes from troupe to troupe — albeit slightly. We have theaters like Charleston Stage that pay upward of $250,000 per show, and we have smaller theaters like PURE Theatre or What If? that can keep production costs to under $20,000. To a larger theater, perhaps, $3,000 is a drop in the bucket, but no matter what, public funding is a big piece of the glue holding our theater community together. When it gets taken away, that money has to be found somewhere else in order for our theaters to thrive. Emily Wilhoit is the executive director of Theatre Charleston, an alliance of over a dozen local theaters. As such, she knows what's up, financially speaking. "The average nonprofit theater arts group budget income comes only from 50 percent tickets. The other 50 percent comes from grants, donations, and sponsorships," she says. Though those numbers can and do vary greatly. "All our theaters very much rely on grants, contributions, and sponsorships to run their seasons." Julian Wiles, founder and producing artistic director of Charleston Stage, arguably Charleston's largest theatrical group, agrees. "Ticket sales only make up about 47 percent of Charleston Stage's production costs. Without sponsors, donors, and public arts funding, Charleston Stage shows would all post a loss," he says. Smaller theaters, too, face the same challenge. At the PURE Theatre, a 100-seat blackbox, the numbers are closer to 54 percent tickets, 46 percent contributions, according to Managing Director Laurens Wilson. All our theaters, it seems, are reliant in large measure on funding received from methods other than ticket sales. So where does all that money go? Again, it varies greatly by theater and their season. At Charleston Stage, which is known for huge musical productions the money seems to flow to its employees. "The biggest costs are people. Although we use the most modern tools such as computers for sound, lights, set design, etc., theater is still very much a hand-made business and requires a lot of hands," says Wiles. "Over the course of a season we employ over 150 musicians, actors, directors, stage hands, choreographers, music directors, and production staff, costumers, scenery, lighting and sound designers, and technicians. As a professional theater all of these artists receive paid compensation." And then there's the royalty fee, which is the money paid for the right to be able to use a copyrighted script. "Royalties range from 10 percent to 13 percent of the gross," continues Wiles. "And royalties generally have to be paid in full before a single ticket is sold, so we are always taking a bit of a chance. For some shows we pay in excess of $30,000 for royalties." Over at PURE, things look similar, though on a smaller scale. Wilson says, "The biggest expense we have are artists. A show that has 10 actors is going to be more expensive than a show with two. If you look at the hard cost of the show alone, you're probably looking at around $15,000. That doesn't include staff salaries that would be applicable to the show." As Wiles said, it's a risk, every time. But are directors taking that into account, and only choosing shows that they think will sell well? You'd think so, but that's not always the case. Take PURE, a theater known for taking risks. Artistic Director Sharon Graci and the theater's board like to try all kinds of different plays. "Whether or not a show will be well-attended comes into consideration for sure," says Graci. "And we may make some adjustments to our season as a whole, knowing we're doing a show that won't be as accessible as another show. But it will never dictate our artistic selections." Some shows do better than expected. Russian Transport, PURE's February comedy about a Russian-Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn attempting to live a perfect American life until uncle Boris arrives and upsets the balance, is one example. The play brought in far more in ticket sales than anticipated. However, other productions don't measure up, so theater directors make sure to plan each season carefully to at least average out. With ticket sales an unreliable form of income, the public funding and donor contributions become ever more important. Thus, the answer to our original question — How much would it hurt to lose $3,000 in public funding? — seems clear, at least to Wilson. "$3,000 would be impactful for anyone. We all fight for every dollar we get," she says. "In a market like Charleston, the pool of contributed income is limited. If you have something you're counting on like city money, and it goes away, it's often hard to go away and replace it."
Via: Charleston City Paper

Conferences

South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education conference set for October

The South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education is hosting its annual Arts Integration Conference Oct. 2 and 3 in Columbia at the Marriott, located at 1200 Hampton St.

For the past 12 years, SCAAE’s annual professional development conference has provided educators with an opportunity to learn how the arts effectively engage students. This year’s conference, The Arts Initiate Learning, will include sessions that address the role of arts integration in 2014’s biggest initiatives, including Common Core, Educator Evaluation, Student Assessment, the new Core Arts Standards, STEAM and Read to Succeed (Literacy Development).

Keynote speaker Lynn Tuttle is director of arts education at the Arizona Department of Education. Her duties include acting as a liaison to the state’s arts educators; providing professional development in Arizona’s Academic Arts Standards, arts assessment and arts integration; and promoting quality arts education programs in Arizona’s schools. She co-chaired the Arizona Arts Education Census Committee, which published the 2010 Arizona Arts Education Census, documenting access and availability of arts education in Arizona’s district and charter schools. She has keynoted for The Kennedy Center’s 2013 Partners in Education conference and the 2013 Biannual Maine Arts Education Conference, and has presented for Americans for the Arts, Arts Education Partnership, the Educational Theatre Association, the Kennedy Center Alliances for Arts Education Network, and other organizations.

An early-bird registration rate is available until Aug. 29. For more information or to register, visit the SCAAE's website.

Via: South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education

News

City of North Charleston welcomes new artist-in-residence

AlexandraRoberts_NCAIR14-15The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department has appointed mixed media artist Alexandra Roberts as Artist-in-Residence for 2014-2015. The City’s Artist-in-Residence serves as a key resource for the department’s outreach programs, especially in the area of art instruction, by providing services to senior groups, public schools, group homes, and other groups within North Charleston city limits. Roberts will be available for visual art residencies of 12-15 hours at a minimum of two-hour increments at North Charleston schools and is also available to host workshops for community groups of all ages. Born in Virginia, Roberts moved to South Carolina as a child. Visual art has always been a major part of her life; she participated in various art clubs and advanced art programs throughout her early education. As a high school junior, she was accepted into the prestigious Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville, S.C. Roberts graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA) with a BFA in Fine Arts in 2006 and immediately pursued the career she is most passionate about, community arts, by obtaining an MA in Community Arts in 2007. Through MICA’s Community Arts Partnership (CAP) program, she had the opportunity to teach art and promote community involvement to young people in the Better Waverly Community in Baltimore, Md. Currently, Roberts is a freelance artist and art instructor with the Casey Community Center in Goose Creek. She is also a teaching artist with the City of North Charleston’s After School Arts Enrichment Program and served as the 2014 North Charleston Arts Festival’s resident artist to create a sculpture with students at the Persephone Moultrie Community Center. She enjoys sharing her passion for art with students of all ages, and her classes consist of working with a variety of materials, such as papers, paint, ink, and much more. Robert’s art is an exploration of media culminating in a symphony of color and texture, with much of her work inspired by personal experiences, observations in society, and her work as a community artist. The North Charleston City Gallery will host an exhibition of Robert’s work throughout January 2015. The gallery is located within the Charleston Area Convention Center at 5001 Coliseum Drive in North Charleston. School liaisons, arts teachers, and the general public are invited to meet the artist at a free gallery reception on Thursday, January 8, 2015, from 5-7 pm. Art teachers and school liaisons may initiate the request for FREE services by the Artist-in-Residence by contacting the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at (843)740-5851. Community groups are also welcome to submit requests, which will be considered on a first come first served basis. All project requests should be placed at least two weeks in advance, with residences completed by the end of May 2015. More information about the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department’s Artist-in-Residence program, as well as the department’s other programs, exhibits, and events, can be found on the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website. Image: Zophia (detail) Via: North Charleston Cultural Arts Department

Conferences

Sessions for everyone at the Statewide Arts Conference!

Update: Richard Evans' session (mentioned below) is now full. Conference registrants will receive information about the waiting list. The Statewide Arts Conference taking place Sept. 18 at the Columbia Conference Center is chock full of opportunities to learn from experts and network with colleagues. For less than $100, you'll have access to the kind of high-quality professional development usually found at regional and national conferences -- and you don't even have to leave the state! old cell phonesThe conference features not one, but two highly sought-after keynote speakers. National Book Award-winning poet and S.C. native Nikky Finney will kick off the conference, and Richard Evans of EmcArts will talk about adaptive change and innovation during lunch. Richard will also present a daylong session targeted at arts organizations and the complex changes we're facing. Space is limited in this interactive session and seats are going fast; everyone who registers for the conference will receive details about signing up for Richard's session. Registration is just $98 per person, or $88 per person if you and a colleague register at the same time. Session highlights (find complete details online.) For artists:

  • Making Your Life as an Artist: A Guide to a Balance, Sustainable Artistic Life
  • Practical Legal Tips for the Creative Person
  • A Life in the Arts: 10 Big Ideas on Career and Financial Success
  • Roundtable discussions/short sessions with Artists U facilitators
For everyone:
  • Creating and Cultivating the Agriculture and Art in Your Community
  • The Arts and Social Change
  • Creativity + Community: Leveraging Change for Good
  • Developing Community Partnerships for Arts Education
  • Everyone Tells Our Story But Us - Toward Authenticity in Artistic Presentations
  • Now Tweet This: Online Marketing is Here to Stay
  • Accessibility and New Audiences
Plus, explore program and funding opportunities from South Arts and the Humanities CouncilSC and get technology assistance through our curbside consultant. Read more details about the sessions and register today!

News

S.C. Philharmonic “kick starts” fundraiser to commission unique concerto

A Kickstarter fundraising campaign lets “little guy” donors help the South Carolina Philharmonic commission a unique concerto to premiere at its March 14, 2015, Masterworks concert. Dan ViscontiAmerican composer Dan Visconti (right) is currently composing Beatbox, the first concerto to pair a full orchestra with a string quintet. Classical music rock stars Sybarite5 (above) team with the S.C. Phil and Music Director Morihiko Nakahara for the work’s world premiere. Rather than seek a corporate or wealthy, individual donor to make Beatbox a reality, the S.C. Phil is using Kickstarter.com to empower non-traditional donors – from every-day patrons to the community at large – to pool smaller donations and fund a portion of the non-traditional new work. Donations ranging from just $1 to $1,200 can help raise $5,000 to go toward the often-prohibitive cost of commissioning new music. The catch with Kickstarter is that the S.C. Phil has just 30 days to raise the full $5,000 goal – or else get nothing at all. “While the S.C. Phil supports contemporary American composers and would like to participate in commissions and consortiums more often, the costs involved are in addition to those of putting a performance on stage,” S.C. Phil Executive Director Rhonda Hunsinger said. “With Visconti, we are also bringing in a critically acclaimed string quintet, which involves additional fees, transportation and lodging. We are able to raise a portion of this through traditional fundraising, but need new sources of support to cover the full cost of this endeavor.” Beatbox is to combine Visconti’s classical/bluegrass/rock style with Sybarite5, who are characterized by their unique style and virtuosity. Visconti and Sybarite5 have worked together before, and while this piece promises to have a folk music influence from Visconti's Virginia upbringing, it is being written specifically for Sybarite5 and will capture the group's energy and musical spirit. The Duluth Superior Orchestra (Minn.) and Midland Symphony Orchestra (Mich.) are joining the S.C. Phil in the commissioning consortium. Visit the Kickstarter campaign page for more information. Via: South Carolina Philharmonic

News

Charleston’s new Gaillard Center prepares for community engagement

From the Charleston Post and Courier (Article by Adam Parker; photos by Brad Nettles)

Professional concert presenters tend to take a long view. They work a year or two, sometimes three or four, in advance in order to ensure that their performance halls are booked. Spoleto Festival USA is already putting the pieces in place for its 2016 arts extravaganza, even as it finalizes the details of next year's 17-day event. The Charleston Symphony, too, is charting its programs and other offerings for the 2015-16 season, the first to include newly named music director, Ken Lam. The recently formed Gaillard Management Corporation, responsible for booking the concert and exhibition halls, is faced with a unique challenge: It must ensure that construction is completed by spring and the facility's crew is ready for action in time for the April 2015 gala. It's got little time. The first full season begins next August. Going forward, GMC will strive to present 10-15 concert programs and other events each season, relying on local arts groups to fill out the rest of the schedule, according to Tom Tomlinson, who was named the organization's first executive director in March. Two weeks ago, GMC hired its new education director, Rick Jerue, former head of the Art Institute of Charleston.

'Maturing of the arts'

GMC board member Luther Cochrane said the opening gala will be a 10-day affair that begins April 17 and concludes two Sundays later. It will include "someone or a combination of people who will be nationally and internationally significant," he said. The concerts all will be acoustic. "The whole point is to showcase the hall," Tomlinson said, adding that negotiations with performers are still underway so details can't be publicized yet. Cochrane said the programming will likely include concerts for children, gospel music and presentations by local artists and ensembles, including the Charleston Symphony Orchestra. The concert and exhibition hall both will be used. "We will try to make it as diverse as we can," he said. The show featuring "internationally significant" artists will be an opening night fundraiser. "As programming for the building is done, it will be done in such a sensitive way as there will be something for everybody," GMC board member Renee Anderson said. Looking further ahead, the Gaillard could host holiday concerts, New Year's Eve galas, opera productions, touring orchestras, popular entertainers and more - in addition to performances by local groups, of course. Jason Nichols, director of the Charleston Concert Association said he was once concerned about whether and how his presenting organization and GMC would work together, but after a series of "very positive discussions," he is happy and optimistic. "I think things are going to work out beautifully for the two organizations," Nichols said. "I think what we'll see with the development of the new Gaillard under (Tomlinson's) leadership is a maturing of the arts community in a very positive way." Work on the building, a $142 million project, continues, now at a frenetic pace. Cochrane said the facility will be ready for public use in April, even if a few punch list items remain unfinished. In May, Spoleto Festival USA takes control of the Gaillard and is planning its own opening festivities, according to General Director Nigel Redden. "We will do our own celebration when we open the festival, trying to show it off in a variety of ways," Redden said. "We are planning a festival that will take full advantage of the Gaillard. We want to test its possibilities." That means a big opera production, dance, classical music concerts and amplified popular music shows. "And we've very excited about it," Redden added. "I think it's going to be a wonderful theater."

'A true civic center'

Jerue, like his GMC colleagues, hit the ground running. He is meeting with leaders in Charleston's arts community, gathering information about education programming here and elsewhere and thinking about ways in which the Gaillard can facilitate stronger outreach. "We don't want to duplicate what others are doing," he said. "We should find out the areas that aren't being served, (where) we might have the unique ability to move in and serve those areas." Eventually he will devise a plan of action. "My philosophy is that the Gaillard needs to be a true civic center that's embraced by the community at large, so I'm going to find ways to try to make that happen," he said, emphasizing the need to be inclusive so that all arts organizations, large and small, have a chance to collaborate with the Gaillard and, potentially, one another. "If it's done right, it's going to provide long-standing direction for the Gaillard." Meanwhile, Tomlinson is (among other things) working to schedule events. Already, 268 "use days" have been booked for the Gaillard Center's first 12 months of operation. Of those days when either the concert hall or exhibition hall is in use, about 170 are "public days" when the Gaillard hosts a performance or event, he said. (The rest are days when rehearsals, set-up and other activities are underway.) He's in discussions with a group in the Southeast that might hold its 2017 convention in the Holy City, and he's actively negotiating with local organizations, including the Charleston Symphony Orchestra, Charleston Concert Association and Jazz Artists of Charleston. Leah Suarez, executive director of Jazz Artists of Charleston, said she is "happy to be at the table" discussing opening festivities and other opportunities. "It says not only that the Gaillard is important but the whole musical landscape," she said. From her organization's perspective, the Gaillard presents some intriguing possibilities. "There are lots of opportunities to utilize the performance hall, as well as the exhibition hall and the outdoor spaces - pretty much the entire building," she said. Jazz Artists of Charleston produces the big band series featuring the Charleston Jazz Orchestra, among other initiatives. The CJO has made its home at the Charleston Music Hall on John Street since its inception more than six years ago, and that's not going to change, Suarez said. But that doesn't mean the CJO and other groups associated with Jazz Artists of Charleston can't present a variety of concerts, education programming and community outreach events in collaboration with the Gaillard, she said. The potential opportunities for engaging young people and drawing them to a major, centralized performance space, are particularly attractive, Suarez added. And the interest the GMC has shown in working with a variety of arts organization is encouraging. "We have a responsibility to make sure Charleston's imprint is diverse and inclusive, and that artists' integrity is intact," Suarez said. "There's plenty of room for everything. That's the feeling I'm getting. It challenges us to be creative as a community, and inclusive, and to collaborate."
Via: Charleston Post and Courier (more images available here.)

News

24 Hour Musical uses theatre arts to benefit the Anderson Free Clinic

Anderson, South Carolina's 24 Hour Musical took the stage August 9, with a production of “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown” at Anderson University’s Belk Theatre. The inaugural event was put together by theatre artists from around the Upstate to raise funds for the Anderson Free Clinic. 24 Hour MusicalThroughout July, local actors submitted audition videos, and the creative team notified those who were cast in the show. The title of the show remained a secret until just 24 hours before showtime. The cast, creative team, and sponsors came together for a kick-off party on August 8 where the show was revealed, and the actors’ roles were announced. Rehearsals began immediately and ran through the night, while teams of volunteers simultaneously located props, made costumes, and built sets. (Editor's note: Anderson joins communities around the country in producing a 24-hour theatre event to benefit a local charity. According to the New York Times, the first 24-Hour Musicals event was staged in New York in 2008; its drama-based cousin, the 24-Hour Plays, has been around since 1995.) Anderson's 24 Hour Musical was founded earlier this year by Noah and Carlie Taylor. The nonprofit organization seeks to better the local and global communities through theatre arts, while creating unifying, uplifting community experiences and introducing new challenges for theatre artists. "The 24 Hour Musical came about because we believe that each individual’s specific talents can be used to better our community,” said Noah Taylor, who is also the artistic director of the new organization. “As theatre artists in the Upstate, we felt that there were very few opportunities for us to do that, and that was something we wanted to change! We also felt that there simply were not enough opportunities for people like us to make theatre. We can only grow as artists when we have opportunities to work and explore our craft. We wanted to kick off something new and exciting that young theatre artists, like ourselves, could embrace." “You’re A Good Man, Charlie Brown” was a success, with the theatre filled to capacity just 10 minutes after the doors opened. Admission was free, but donations were accepted. In all, the organization raised $1,530.50, enough to meet the Free Clinic’s one-day operating expenses of $1,451. According to Karen Mauch, the Clinic’s funds development coordinator, in one day at the Anderson Free Clinic: • 35-40 patients will be seen by one of the Clinic’s medical providers • 8-10 patients will be seen by a volunteer dentists • approximately 200 prescriptions will be dispensed • 2-4 other health care professionals (RNs and medical assistants) will triage patients • 3-5 students preparing for careers in healthcare professions will gain clinical experience • 10-15 community volunteers will assist staff with clerical duties and in the pharmacy • Staff will schedule patient appointments and maintain patient records "This donation means that for one more day, Free Clinic staff and volunteers will come together to provide care, medications and education to patients that will help them stabilize conditions that have often been ignored," said Mauch. "The Clinic is also excited to show the community that one does not need to have a healthcare background to help the Free Clinic in their mission to bring healthcare to Anderson’s underserved!" As for the 24 Hour Musical, the board of directors is already planning for next year’s event. They hope to partner with a different charity every year and continue to impact the Upstate community with the arts. They also look forward to bringing more exciting, unique events to the area, as early as next spring. To learn more about the 24 Hour Musical, visit www.24hourmusicalsc.org. Via: 24 Hour Musicals

News

Florence photography project shows we are all the same

From SCNow.com:
FLORENCE, S.C. — Florence is made up of wonderful, unique people, and everyone has a story to tell. Photographers Robin Eaddy Condrey and Harley Pinto-Williams recently set out to tell those stories through a new photography project called “Humans of Florence.” Inspired by a Facebook page that documents the stories of people living in New York, Eaddy Condrey and Pinto-Williams began seeking subjects closer to home.
“We were just talking about the ‘Humans of New York’ Facebook page, and we were like, ‘Oh, did you see this post today? Did you see that post?’ We were talking about it all the time,” Pinto-Williams said. “We were just like, ‘We need to start doing this in Florence.’ We both just felt it at the same time.”
“It was almost one of those, ‘Jinx, you-owe-me-a-Coke moments,’” Eaddy Condrey added. “We went out the very next day looking for people.” (Visit the Humans of Florence Facebook page for more information and photos.)
Both of the women are artists, and Eaddy Condrey said that for her, a camera is simply another tool that she uses to express herself artistically.
“I’ve had a camera in my hands since my mom gave me her brownie camera when I was 6,” Eaddy Condrey said. “I have been taking portraits of everything ever since. In 2002, I started doing photography for a living. In 2010, I put the name Foto Flo on it to honor my town, the town I grew up in.”
Pinto-Williams said that she is not a native of Florence, but she is appreciative of the history and stories of the town and its citizens.
“For me, this project is offering people even more ways to be proud of being a Florence resident,” Pinto-Williams said. “People, with anywhere they live, will say, ‘Oh, I hate this town. It is so small,’ and all these other flaws. But there are so many beautiful and incredible things, like small projects, people and businesses, if you just widen your scope and zoom in.”
Pinto-Williams said she hopes the project will inspire people to get out and explore the place they live.
“We want people to see that they live in an amazing community,” Pinto-Williams said. “We can also offer them things that they might not have known about that they might be interested in, like Keep Florence Beautiful, and they might want to be a part of it and volunteer. It is a great way for people to see all of the beautiful aspects of their community and want to contribute.”
The project is also about showing people that even in their imperfections, or the moments in their lives that are less than ideal, there is beauty, Eaddy Condrey said.
“I’ve never had body-image issues,” Eaddy Condrey said. “But I know that there are a lot of women who struggle with that. This is really about changing the way that people view themselves. We don’t want those people who are going to go put on their makeup or something. We want the rawness of who they are, not who they can make themselves to be. I want to show people that the way they are is beautiful.”
With more than 800 likes on their page since it was started, Pinto-Williams said she believes people understand what they are trying to do and appreciate it.
“I think people have been responding really well, because it is raw,” Pinto-Williams said. “It is like this is where they are from, this is who they are, and maybe they could be on there one day.”
And though the project is still in its infancy, Eaddy Condrey and Pinto-Williams said they are already looking in to ways to fund more aspects of their venture, including the possibility of a book of pictures and stories.
“The sky is not even the limit,” Eaddy Condrey said. “I see art in every person, in everything.”
Images: Humans of Florence

News

Greenville’s Fine Arts Center and Clemson University partner to kickstart student careers

From The Greenville News:

Dr. Richard Goodstein, Dean of College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities Clemson University, (left) and Fine Arts Center Director Roy Fluhrer at a press conference announcing partnership Dr. Richard Goodstein, Dean of College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities Clemson University, (left) and Fine Arts Center Director Roy Fluhrer at a press conference announcing partnership. Image courtesy Brooks Center for the Performing Arts Greenville County Schools and Clemson University announced a partnership today that will allow high school students to earn college credit for their studies at the Fine Arts Center. Clemson’s performing and visual arts programs will extend credit hours toward a bachelor of fine arts in visual arts or production studies for students who receive high grades in acting, visual arts and theater classes. “This new partnership is specifically career-oriented,” said Rick Goodstein, dean of Clemson’s College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. He said by entering college with a few classes worth of credit under their belts, arts students will be able to “kickstart their careers.” “You get to enter at a higher level. And that’ll develop their talent even further by the time they finish their undergraduate education,” he said. Roy Fluhrer, director of the Fine Arts Center, said the collaboration is a reflection of the high-level curriculum already being taught at the Fine Arts Center, and no changes to class structure or content is planned in order to provide college credit. “This program represents the future of college credit programs, and that is the opportunity to pair with students in their area of interest, their area of skill and the area that they will likely focus on, not just in their post-secondary education but in their later life,” said Greenville County Schools Superintendent Burke Royster. The partnership goes into effect for the 2014-15 school year, including the class of 2014 graduates who are attending Clemson. Fine Arts Center alumna and rising Clemson freshman Elise Huguley said it will help her keep college costs down by shortening the time she needs to spend in school to get her degree.
Related article from Clemson University with enrollment information.