State Art Collection gets 12-day run at S.C. State Fair

And FOLKfabulous is back for third year


Funnel cake? Check. Corn dog? Check. Cotton candy? Check. Tyrone Geter? Check.  Wait, what? To help celebrate its 150th anniversary, the South Carolina State Fair invited the State Art Collection to show off iconic contemporary works by #SCartists in the shadow of the famed rocket. Artists who have exhibited in the State Fair’s annual exhibition dating back to the early 1960s, works that reflect aspects of fair culture, and some iconic pieces from the State Art Collection are featured in the Rosewoods Building at Pig Tales, Blackberry Winter, & the Cabinet of Curiosities today through Oct. 20. In keeping with the fair theme, fair guests are invited to spin the new S.C. Arts Commission spinning wheel. When the wheel stops on a work of art in the exhibition, search that work out. Snap a selfie with it, and share it with your networks on social media! The artists and works, an event rundown, and more are available at SouthCarolinaArts.com.

McKissick Museum celebrates return of FOLKfabulous

Join the University of South Carolina’s McKissick Museum at the South Carolina State Fair for FOLKFabulous@theFair. This year, the museum's signature folklife festival celebrates South Carolina’s rich textile arts heritage, including Native American, African American and Mennonite quilting traditions in conjunction with the McKissick exhibition, Piece by Piece: Quilts from the Permanent Collection. You’re invited to participate and engage with artists and cultural traditions that make the Palmetto State home! Come to the Rosewoods Building to enjoy arts displays, demonstrations and hands-on craft activities, concerts and hands-on music workshops. You won’t want to miss the chance to try your hand at making a story quilt block or contribute to our yarn-bombing display. You’ll also find music to move your heart and dancing feet at a Harvest Dance featuring old-time music by Andy Brooks, a bluegrass concert by the Carolina Rebels, and Gullah music and storytelling by internationally renowned performers Ron and Natalie Daise. Click here for complete information on FOLKfabulous@theFair.

#SCartists sweep top prizes at WMAC’s first juried show

The first-place winner in West Main Artists Co-op’s first four-state juried art exhibit -- WMAC 2019 -- is Cindy Shute of Lockhart, SC, for her oil-on-linen painting Peacemaker: Hrair Balian. She receives a cash prize of $2,500 that was given in memory of Frank P. Cyrill, Jr. Second prize of $1,000 was taken by Gordon Dohm of Greenville for his photograph Fungi Fantasy. The third-place prize of $500 was won by Tracey M. Timmons of Spartanburg for Manacle of Justice, a bracelet made of vitreous enamel, copper, silver, brass, and photography. The seven merit awards of $100 and $250 went to Mark Flowers of Alexander, NC; Lee Sipe of Columbia; Sabrina Barilone of Macon, Georgia; Tom Dimond of Seneca; Christina Dixon of Roebuck; David Stuart of North Augusta; and Martha Worth of Hilton Head.


WMAC 2019 opened on Saturday, Sept. 14, and closes Saturday, Oct. 19. It was open to all adult visual artists in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. Two-hundred-forty-one (241) artists from the four states applied, and 66 were admitted into the show based on the judgement of jurors Ann DerGara and  Mike Vatalaro. The winners were announced Saturday, Sept. 21, during a reception and awards ceremony. Seventy-four (74) works of art in this exhibit are on display at the Co-op, which is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There is no charge to see the exhibitions. In their jurors’ statements, DerGara said, “ I am amazed at the quality of work that was entered. I think that opening the show to additional states has made this become an important show for the region and Spartanburg. The arts are growing rapidly in the region and this show will make Spartanburg known as art venue as well as Asheville and Greenville. As the Arts grow so does the economy. WMAC produced this show and jury with professionalism and expertise.” "The very nature of a juried exhibition celebrates a broad range of medium and imagery. I enjoyed the task of identifying works that well represented the mediums chosen, techniques accomplished and the subjects investigated. The exhibition reveals a broad selection of work which I believe demonstrate an individual vision within both conventional and experimental genres. I was very impressed by the quality and richness demonstrated in all of the mediums displayed. I hope you will find each work invites close examination and has something unique to offer," Vatalaro said. A list of all accepted work can be found online at WestMainArtists.org. “We could not be happier with our first juried show,” Chairwoman Beth Regula said. “This is something we had wanted to do for several years, and it took more than a year of planning, but it was worth it. Having a show of this magnitude and with these cash prizes establishes West Main Artists Co-op as an art agency that is leading Spartanburg in its quest to be an art Mecca in South Carolina and throughout the South. It says we have the creativity, the know-how, the professionalism, the resources, and the desire to take the Co-op to the next level. Next year will be even better!”
“I’m so excited to be a part of WMAC’s world,” Shute said. “This first exhibition was as professionally conducted as I have ever seen. When I was told I was Best in Show, at the time, honestly, I was shocked. It’s not that I didn’t think my painting is good. As a professional artists mature, we know our good work from our less successful efforts—I think that’s a key part of being a professional. So I wasn’t surprised to have been included in the show. “When I arrived that evening and saw the body of work I was thrilled. Virtually every piece in the exhibition is good—very good. A couple of pieces took my breath away. So, I felt particularly honored to be included. With Peacemaker, I had pushed myself into a new space with portraiture. In my early work I tended to avoid background, contextual elements, thinking at the time that the subject should convey their story a priori—that the essence of the sitter should be codified in the presentation of their likeness, and if successful, the minimalist approach would say everything that needed to be said. So this new approach for me, including symbolic elements to tell the story, was a big leap. “I honestly feel validated,” she continued. “I wasn’t sure if the piece worked. So now I’m really charged up about this new direction, and ready to take on more portrait-stories. And I’m so very grateful to WMAC for giving me a big hug along the way!”
The Co-op is a membership-based nonprofit arts agency with more than 50 members, who are visual artists and performing artists. It is housed in a former Baptist church near downtown Spartanburg on West Main Street. Now celebrating its 10th anniversary, the Co-op houses  31 artists studios, two stages, three galleries, a printery, a ceramics studio, and the largest collection of for-sale locally made art in Spartanburg. Each month, the Co-op normally installs three exhibits by its members and guest artists. For more, visit the Co-op's website by clicking here.

Poster design competition for 2020 North Charleston Arts Fest underway

Submission deadline: Sunday, Dec. 15, 2019


The City of North Charleston is calling for South Carolina visual artists to participate in the 2020 North Charleston Arts Fest Poster Design Competition.  The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone. The winning piece will become the official poster design of the 2020 North Charleston Arts Fest, taking place April 29-May 3, and will be featured on all promotional materials and merchandise, including posters, billboards, print and digital advertisements, television commercials, program booklets, apparel, online, and more. The winning artist will receive a $500 purchase award and a solo exhibition at the North Charleston City Gallery during May 2020. In addition, the winning piece will become part of the City of North Charleston’s Public Art Collection, which is displayed throughout City Hall. The deadline to submit works for the competition is Sunday, December 15, 2019. There is NO entry fee to participate in competition. It's open to South Carolina residents ages 18 and older. Categories of work accepted are: acrylic, oil, drawing, pastel, watercolor, and 2-D mixed media. Entries must be submitted online here by the Dec. 15 deadline. Artists may enter a maximum of three pieces into the competition. Previous Arts Fest Design Competition winners include Joseph Kameen of Graniteville (2019), Hamed Mahmoodi of Greenville (2018), Judy McSween of Charleston (2017), Lisa Shimko of Charleston (2016), Karole Turner Campbell (KTC) of North Charleston (2015); Amiri Gueka Farris of Bluffton (2014); Linda Elksnin of Mt. Pleasant (2013); Elena Barna of North Charleston (2012); and Pedro Rodriguez of Goose Creek (2011). The North Charleston Arts Fest is organized and presented by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department.  The annual five-day celebration of arts and culture highlights national, regional and local artists and performers in the areas of dance, music, theatre, visual art, media art, and literature. For more than 35 years the festival has made quality arts programming affordable and accessible to the widest spectrum of the public, attracting more than 30,000 residents and visitors from throughout the Southeast and beyond to experience free and modestly priced performances, workshops, exhibitions, and activities in a variety of venues, including libraries, community centers, schools, businesses, and parks. The event has matured into one of the most comprehensive arts festivals in the state of South Carolina.
For more information about the 2020 North Charleston Arts Fest and other participation opportunities visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com, or contact the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department office at 843.740.5854 or culturalarts@northcharleston.org. Artists in need of assistance with any part of the submission process may contact the Cultural Arts Department to schedule a meeting, which can be conducted over the phone or in person.

‘Govies’ celebrate school’s landmark birthday

S.C. Governor's School for the Arts & Humanities turns 20


The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the opening of its public residential high school for the arts in Greenville. To kick off a year of celebrations, the school recently held a Founder’s Day Convocation honoring founder and first president Virginia Uldrick (right), a legend across the state for her work in arts education. Uldrick established the Governor’s School’s one-of-a-kind residential high school in 1999, after 10 years of working with legislators, generating support and fundraising to realize her dream: a tuition-free high school that provides pre-professional arts training and a nationally recognized academic education to South Carolina’s artistically talented students. “Her vision was one that we now know to be a model for public education, where the excellence in the arts and academics that she envisioned ultimately places each of our students among the most successful young professionals in the arts and all professions throughout our state and across the nation,” said Governor’s School President Cedric Adderley. He added, “Had it not been for her persistent pursuit of excellence and her vision, so many people would have never had the opportunity to pursue their passion in the arts or pursue the level of a quality education that they so much deserve.”

A firm foundation for arts education, bolstered by then-Governor Riley

Prior to the Governor’s School’s residential high school program, Uldrick established a five-week summer program under the school’s former name, the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts. This program was signed into legislation in 1980 by the state’s governor at the time, Richard W. Riley, who later became the longest-serving U.S. Secretary of Education. As the keynote speaker of the school’s Founder’s Day Convocation, Riley stated that Uldrick “was an enormous force for good in South Carolina and this country.” He also said, “I’m so proud of the success of the wonderful Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities,” and encouraged students to “pause a few minutes and think about this unique opportunity that the state of South Carolina is providing for you. Think about the wonderful leadership and talented faculty making possible your quality education and talent.”

Alumni impact arts education across South Carolina

Many Governor’s School alumni are continuing Uldrick’s legacy by giving back to younger generations through arts advocacy and education. Some of those alums are now educators in South Carolina. Among them are Jim LeBlanc, class of 2003, who is the principal of Saluda River Academy for the Arts; Andre North, class of 2005, who is the Director of Bands at Hanahan Middle School and assistant director of bands at Hanahan High School; Brooke Falk Permenter, class of 2002, who serves on the faculty at the College of Charleston Honors College; John Ott, class of 2009, who is a gifted and talented teacher in the Orangeburg Consolidated School District; and Stephanie Cureton, class of 2007, who is the director of English Theatre Arts in Greenville.

Alumni have gained national success in the arts and beyond

Many alumni have made names for themselves in their profession on a national scale, thanks to the elevated level of arts training that Uldrick set the groundwork for and remains the Governor’s School’s standard today. Graduates who are bringing acclaim to South Carolina include Patina Miller, a Tony Award-winning actress from Pageland who has held major roles in television series, films, and on Broadway; Rachel Inman, from Greenville, who is the UX Design Lead for Google Maps; Jonathan Spigner, also from Greenville, is a lead dancer in the Hong Kong Ballet; Jedd Rosche, from Beaufort, is the senior congress editor for CNN Politics; and Maria Fabrizio, from Columbia, whose Wordless News illustrations have been commissioned or published by NPR.com, O Magazine, and the New York Times. While the Governor’s School honors Uldrick and reflects on how her fierce determination has made a life-changing impact on thousands of students’ lives, the school happily anticipates what’s to come. “As we celebrate our first 20 years, we look forward to the next 20 years and the continued impact this school will have on young artists in South Carolina as they pursue their dreams,” said Chad Prosser, Governor’s School board chair, during the convocation.

More 20th anniversary events statewide

A student showcase will be hosted in Hilton Head on Nov. 7, 2019 and a celebratory reception will be held in Spartanburg on Dec. 5. In the spring, special events include an anniversary reception in Columbia on March 4, 2020, and a student and alumni showcase at the Peace Center in Greenville on April 7, 2020. Find out more about these upcoming events at https://www.scgsah.org/calendar/events.

About S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities

Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in the areas of creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in a master-apprentice community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students, and SCGSAH serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. Visit SCGSAH.org for more information.

S.C. Arts Alliance announces Graduate Fellowship

One three-month, paid position available

Application deadline: Thursday, Oct. 31, 2019
Just announced last week, The Hub doesn't want you to miss this big news: the S.C. Arts Alliance is launching a brand new program: a Graduate Fellowship offered this coming Spring semester. They are looking for a passionate graduate student pursuing an advanced degree in arts administration (or similar creative field) to fulfill one fellowship position for the Spring 2020 semester. This paid, three-month position will give the student an immersive and purposeful experience in government relations, marketing, event and creative management that results in real world experience and connections that will serve their careers in the future.
  • Application closes Oct. 31, 2019
  • Fellowship runs Jan. 8-April 8, 2020
  • Stipend of $1,500
More information and the application can be found here for this wonderful opportunity!

Arts ed position open in Sumter

Director of Art Education at Sumter County Gallery of Art

Deadline to apply: n/a
The director of art education at the Sumter County Gallery of Art (SCGA) manages the Art Education Program. He/She is responsible for the overall curriculum development, coordination and operation of the Gallery’s educational programs, which includes gallery based programs and art classes, and off-site, community–based art education programs and partnerships. The position requires a high level of professionalism, commitment to quality programming and excellent service, connecting with families and children, artist communities, education communities, community organizations, and the community at-large. The successful candidate should be a highly creative thinker with the ability to develop an art education based and fun curriculum that utilizes a variety of media. Shall possess knowledge of modern and contemporary art and artistic practices, including socially engaged and culturally diverse art; commitment to community engagement; research, budgeting, personnel management skills. A bachelor's degree is required, and a master's degree preferred in Art Education, Studio Art or related field OR a minimum 2 years experience in art education at the classroom, museum or arts organization level is preferred. The position involves some weekend and evening work. Click here to learn more!

Arts & cultural orgs invited to free QuickBooks seminars

Two opportunities from Elliott Davis

 
Managing finances is a critical component of running any business. Arts and cultural organizations are no different, but most often differ in approach. Not to be overly general, but where their non-arts counterparts of all sizes might be owned or managed by business-school grads who know their way around balance sheets, an arts-based business is likely operated by creatives more familiar with drop cloths and sheet music than spreadsheets. Nick Annan of Elliott Davis is inviting arts organizations to one of two late-October seminars in the Midlands to see whether they can benefit from the could accounting and best practices of QuickBooks online. "For no cost, you will be able to learn about some of the time-saving features of the system and have the opportunity to ask questions of an Intuit product consultant," Annan said. QuickBooks, by Intuit, is an industry-leader in computerized financial management tools for business. There will be two events: Annan said anyone thinking about using QuickBooks is welcome to attend, with the most appropriate attendee being the person from the organization most likely to use that system to manage finances (or an executive director). He and his team have had success working with arts and cultural organizations and see potential in the sector. A musician himself, Annan wants to combine his passions of music and arts with his love of his vocation. The S.C. Arts Commission, South Carolina Arts Alliance, and the Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation have partnered in the past to present "A Stronger Bottom Line" to SCAC grantee arts organizations with budgets between $200,000 and $750,000. While the upcoming QuickBooks Seminars are presented without respect to budget size, services from Elliott Davis for ongoing accounting and finance services can be determined through consultation.

Grants Roundup: Deadlines for the Week of Oct. 7, 2019

Though far from the only thing, grants are among the main things we do here. Because of their importance in our work, and what they mean to so many of you, The Hub wants to help keep Arts Commission grants top-of-mind and reduce the number of times people say, "If only we'd known about (X or Y) grant!"

We can't reach everybody, but we can try. On Mondays with deadlines on the horizon, "Grants Roundup" highlights first what grants are due that week and then includes what's coming later in increments.


This week

These are to serve mainly as final reminders to finish in-progress applications. Most grant applications simply cannot be undertaken well in this short a time frame. Consult an appropriate member of our team with questions.

  • n/a

Next week

  • n/a

Next 30(ish)

Rolling Deadlines

Important Notes

  • You are encouraged to also consult the SCAC grants page for up-to-date information on all grant deadlines (subject to change) and deadlines for non-grant programs.
  • For next steps, grant guidance, and more information, consult the appropriate member of our team if you are an artist or represent local organizations, an educational institution, or a non-arts business or organization offering arts programming.

Tuning Up: #SCartists, SCAC fellows figure in prominent exhibitions

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


It's not going to be 95 degrees today, so even though this is a Monday, we've got that going for us. Here are some tidbits on The Hub's radar:
  • The Aiken Standard has a nice review/preview of 2019 Biennial at Columbia's 701 Center for Contemporary Art. #SCartists abound, including S.C. Arts Commission Fellows.
  • More Columbia: Art Project Furthers Columbia’s Connection With German Sister City (Free Times). TL;DR: just click and read because you won't be sorry. The Hub has lived in Columbia for 20-some years and had no idea we have a sister city... Kaiserslautern. In Germany. (Or anywhere. But we did know South Carolina's sister state is Queensland, Australia.) Sadly, that is about as long as the partnership among the cities' artists, so demerits to The Hub and kudos for art partnerships of all kinds. You'll see several familiar names involved.

Jason Rapp

Free grant writing workshop in Dillon

South Carolina Humanities, the Dillon County Theatre Association, and the city of Dillon Wellness Center will be the hosts of a FREE grants writing workshop. Staff and volunteers of South Carolina cultural organizations and nonprofit agencies are invited to attend. The workshop will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 13, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the City of Dillon Wellness Center (647 Commerce Dr., Dillon, SC 29536). Admission to the workshop is free, but pre-registration is REQUIRED. The workshop is especially targeting, but is not exclusive to, the Pee Dee counties of Chesterfield, Darlington, Dillon, Florence, Marion, and Marlboro. More information about the workshop and the online registration form can be found here: https://schumanities.org/news/free-grants-writing-workshop-in-dillon/.