News

Laurel & Milly

Add your event to Arts Daily!

The South Carolina Arts Commission's arts calendar, Arts Daily, has joined forces with The Hub. Now you can visit one place to view or submit arts news AND events! Long-time Arts Daily users will notice that the revamped event submission process is simpler. You can also add your arts venue (if you haven't already) to The Hub's venue list through the Arts Daily submission process. Online readers of Arts Daily can search and sort events to find activities based on location, art form or type of event. Is your event or opportunity right for Arts Daily? If it's arts-related, open to the public, and of interest to people in South Carolina, then yes! Event types include auditions, calls for entries & contests, classes, conferences, exhibitions, fellowships & residencies, openings, book signings, performances, screenings and more. You'll choose the type when you submit your event or opportunity. To submit arts events to Arts Daily, use the Submit Events button. (Be sure to submit your event at least one month in advance.) If your event has an interesting news element, you can also send it to The Hub through the Submit Story button. Arts events submitted at least one month in advance will appear on the Arts Daily website, and some will be recorded for radio.

How to decide what to submit where

Submit Event to Arts Daily: Arts Daily listings and radio announcements are limited to the key details and a brief description of your event and will direct readers to your website or organization for a lengthier description. Arts events submitted at least one month before the event will be posted to the online Arts Daily calendar. Not all events are recorded for the radio. The earlier you submit, the longer it will appear on the Arts Daily site for readers to find and the better chance the event will be recorded for radio. You can even submit an entire season at once! Submit Story to The Hub: If your event has a news component, you can also submit a lengthier article or news release through The Hub's Submit Story button. Story submissions, if accepted, appear as articles on The Hub's main page and "roll off" the page as other articles are posted -- the lifespan of a Hub article is much shorter than an Arts Daily entry. Hub articles will direct readers to your website or organization for more information. What makes an event newsworthy? A few questions to ask: Does the event relate to a larger purpose (e.g., an artist's studio or gallery opening is a result of the arts reviving a downtown, a celebrity S.C. artist is participating to raise awareness and/or funds, a student exhibition illustrates the benefit of arts education, etc.)? Is this a first time for the event, or a milestone anniversary? Did the project break an attendance or fundraising record? Sometimes the news element occurs after an event when you're ready to share results and photos. Bottom line: Submit ALL arts events to Arts Daily, at least one month in advance. Submit more info about your event to The Hub ONLY if there is an extra news element. Remember, you may also use the Submit Story button to send your feature articles, blog posts, stories, etc. about arts topics other than events.

Writing your Arts Daily Event Description

Arts Daily web listings and radio announcements are designed to provide the most vital pieces of information about your event or opportunity and refer users to ArtsDaily.org and/or to your website or organization for details. We encourage you to use your Event Description space to provide a self-contained, factual summary of your event or opportunity. ONLY the text in the Event Description field will be used in your radio announcement, should your submission be chosen for broadcast. What to include in the Event Description:
  • The name of the event or opportunity and a brief description of it
  • Who is responsible for it (hosting or presenting organization)
  • Where (venue and city)
  • When (date and time)
  • Cost to participate
  • Deadline for the public to participate (e.g., registration, submission), if applicable. (Note: This is not a deadline for posting on Arts Daily.)
What not to include in the Event Description:
  • Contact information. Radio announcements will direct listeners to the Arts Daily website where you have entered this information.
  • Superlatives (such as “the best,” “beautiful,” “a great achievement,” etc.) will be excluded from the final listing.
Want a template? Try this: (Name of the presenting or host organization) presents (name of the event), (event date) at (event time), at (event venue) in (city, and state if not South Carolina). (Provide a description of the event, so that Arts Daily users will understand what it is and whether or not they would like to attend.) Tickets are (cost). (Provide registration and/or submission requirements and/or deadline, if applicable.) Questions? We're happy to help. Contact us here. About Arts Daily Arts Daily is a partnership between the South Carolina Arts Commission, South Carolina ETV Radio, and the College of Charleston.

Recognition

S.C. Governor’s School student receives nation’s highest honor for teen poets

Cameron MessinidesCameron Messinides of Camden, a senior at the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities, has been named to the 2014 class of the National Student Poets Program (NSPP), the nation’s highest honor for teen poets presenting original work. Five outstanding young poets, each representing a different region of the United States, were appointed by the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) and the nonprofit Alliance for Young Artists & Writers to showcase the essential role of writing and the arts in academic and personal success. The students kicked off their year of service as literary ambassadors in Washington, D.C., with a poetry reading hosted by First Lady Michelle Obama in the Blue Room of the White House (pictured above). “With this award, we celebrate the exceptional creativity, dedication, and promise of the young poets we honor today. Their courage, compassion, and imagination are inspiring others and shaping the world around them. As literary ambassadors to people across the country, these young people have the opportunity to set an example and inspire audiences of all ages with their written work, readings and service projects. Our National Student Poets and all of our young people have unlimited potential, and I can't wait to see what they accomplish in the years ahead,” noted Mrs. Obama, Honorary Chairman of the President's Committee on the Arts and the Humanities. Cameron, age 17, is a creative writing student at the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities. He was recognized with an honorary mention for the Leonard L. Milberg ’53 Secondary School Poetry Prize, and his work has been published on The Atlantic’s website. He lives in Camden, South Carolina, with his parents and five brothers and sisters, where, besides writing, he spends his time playing basketball, clumsily cooking dinner once a week, and helping raise the family goats. Read Cameron's poetry online. The National Student Poets each receive an academic award of $5,000 funded by the Bernstein Family Foundation. During their tenure, the students will lead readings and workshops at libraries, museums and schools throughout the country, as well as participate in prestigious events. They will additionally implement community service projects in their respective regions. Students in grades 9–11 who are interested in becoming 2015 National Student Poets can submit their work to the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards, the nation’s longest-running and most prestigious scholarship and recognition initiative for creative teens. Deadlines for art and writing submissions vary by region. Photo of presentation by Paul Morse for the National Student Poets Program. Via: Scholastic Art & Writing Awards

Grants

ArtPlace “particularly interested” in grant applications from South Carolina

Letters of Inquiry due Nov. 3, 2014. ArtPlace America is currently accepting Letters of Inquiry for the 2015 round of its National Grants Program. Grants range from $50,000-500,000. This year ArtPlace intends to support approximately 40 projects with roughly $10 million. Any individual or organization within the United States or U.S. Territories is eligible to apply. ArtPlace’s National Grants Program targets creative placemaking projects in which art and culture help strengthen the social, physical, and economic fabric of communities. ArtPlace is particularly interested in projects from states in which it has not yet granted, including Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, Nevada, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Utah, and Wyoming. Since 2011, ArtPlace’s National Grants Program has contributed $56.8 million to 189 projects in 122 communities across 42 states and the District of Columbia Letters of Inquiry are due by November 3, 2014, at 3:59 p.m. EST. Answers to Frequently Asked Questions are available on the ArtPlace website, and technical issues can be directed to grants@artplaceamerica.org. For more information or to submit an application, please visit www.ArtPlaceAmerica.org/LOI. Via: ArtPlace

Events

Coupling science with creativity – S.C. Summit on STEM and Arts taking place in Spartanburg

South Carolina Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May will speak on behalf of the arts community.
Approximately 400 educators, lawmakers, and business leaders from South Carolina are expected to attend the “S.C. Summit on STEM and the Arts In and Out of School” conference at Chapman Cultural Center Monday and Tuesday, Sept. 29 and 30. The attendees will explore the national hot topic of injecting more Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics – and Arts — into the educational and after-school system. The conference will focus on putting more emphasis on the hard sciences with a goal of better preparing students to enter the technology-based workforce that is quickly becoming the new norm. The opening remarks will be made by The Honorable Dot Harris, U.S. Deputy Secretary of Energy. “We are especially glad to hold this annual meeting in Spartanburg and at Chapman Cultural Center,” Tom Peters, Ed.D., Executive Director of South Carolina Coalition for Mathematics and Science at Clemson University, said. “STEM is a rapidly growing movement across the nation, and now the time has come to find out where the arts and creativity fit into the model. Where better than to explore this concept than at a fine arts and science institution such as Chapman Cultural Center?” The South Carolina Afterschool Alliance and South Carolina’s Coalition for Mathematics and Science have joined together again to bring a new opportunity for networking, dialogue, and information to thought and action leaders in STEM education. Government, business, faith and community leaders are invited to come together to learn about new programs, curricula, and strategies that can address some of the economic and social issues that confront the children and youth of South Carolina. One of the most recent developments in STEM’s evolution is the addition of art into the academic mix. This new concept is being called STEAM: Science, Technology, Engineering, Art/Design, and Mathematics. “The strategy of linking in and out of school STEAM learning involves cross-sector collaboration,” Zelda Waymer, Executive Director of the South Carolina Afterschool Alliance, said. “The partnerships we have created with the South Carolina Coalition for Mathematics and Science at Clemson University and Chapman will equip educators from different settings with innovative techniques and advance STEAM learning statewide.” The event’s keynote speaker will be Chris Desoiza, Vice President of Research, at Milliken and Company. His topic will be Securing the Future Through Innovation. Speaking on behalf of the arts community will be Ken May, Executive Director, South Carolina Arts Commission and board member of the South Carolina Afterschool Alliance. “Between these two leaders, we should have exceptional information and insights into STEM, the arts, and after school,” Dr. Peters said. “We couldn’t be prouder to host this statewide education conference at Chapman Cultural Center,” Jennifer Evins, President and CEO of Chapman, said. “We are strong supporters of STEM, and we want to make sure that the arts and creativity find their rightful places in the nation’s push to improve the educational system. There is no doubt that more hard sciences need to be taught in the schools. But science has to be coupled with creativity for it to be utilized to its fullest potential. It is when a mind is both scientific and creative that we get the most earth-shaking discoveries and advancements.” On September 29, the pre-conference will include a S.C. Stakeholders session sponsored by the South Carolina Afterschool Alliance and the National Conference of State Legislatures. Senator Tim Scott has been invited to open the meeting. Featured panelists include Harris; plus Tom Thompson and Molly Spearman, both candidates for SC Superintendent of Education. During the convention, participants will tour several Upstate businesses, schools, and organizations to get firsthand experience at how STEAM is being utilized in and outside the regular school day. Registration for the two-day program is $125. This fee includes the workplace tour, lunches, and reception. See the full schedule of sessions, information on group rate lodging, and register at scCoalition.org/stem-education-summit or call (864) 656-1863. Via: Chapman Cultural Center

Arts News

S.C. native Terrance Hayes receives prestigious MacArthur Fellowship

Congratulations to Columbia native Terrance Hayes for being named MacArthur Foundation Fellow! From The State: Terrance Hayes 2014 MacArthur Genius Award FellowCOLUMBIA, SC — Poet Terrance Hayes, 42, a native of Columbia and graduate of Coker College, has won one of the most prestigious individual development grants from the MacArthur Foundation. Hayes, whose work infuses hip-hop with the sensibility of his southern bringing that includes the legacy of Strom Thurmond, has published several volumes of poetry that addresses race, gender and family. Hayes, 42, is a professor of writing in the Department of English at the University of Pittsburgh. The "genius grant" from the MacArthur Foundation recognizes exceptional individuals doing transformative, creative work with a track record of achievement in their field and the potential for even more significant contributions in the future. Fellows each receive a no-strings-attached grant of $625,000. Hayes has a bachelor's degree from Coker College and a master's in fine arts from the University of Pittsburgh. He was affiliated with Xavier University of Louisiana and Carnegie Mellon University before joining the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh as a professor of writing in 2013. His additional publications include "Muscular Music" (1999), "Hip Logic" (2002), and the forthcoming "How to Be Drawn" (March 2015). Image courtesy of the MacArthur Foundation

Arts News

Sandlapper Singers co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush announces retirement

Lillian QuackenbushThe Sandlapper Singers of Columbia have announced that artistic director and co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush will retire at the end of the 2016 season. The transition begins with the hiring of a general manager for the organization in 2014. The search for a new artistic director begins in January 2015 with the goal of selecting three candidates by summer 2015. These three candidates will each be asked to join Dr. Quackenbush to prepare and conduct the chorus on one of the three series concerts in the 2015-2016 season. The candidate chosen will join the organization in July 2016. About The Sandlapper Singers Sandlapper Singers The Sandlapper Singers, South Carolina’s premier professional chorus, was established in 1996 by Lillian and Dave Quackenbush and has presented American music in a uniquely entertaining and engaging style since that time. The 34-voice auditioned ensemble is currently in its 19th season, performing an annual subscription series in the Columbia area. The Singers also presents additional performances each year in communities across the state of South Carolina and the Southeast and has performed overseas. The group is directed and conducted by co-founder Dr. Lillian Quackenbush, retired chairman of the Columbia College music department and recipient of the 2012 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor's Award for Life Time Achievement in the Arts, sponsored by the South Carolina Arts Commission. The Singers focus on the works of American composers past and present, a departure from the usual programming of European choral literature, offering a delightful mix of both familiar and new musical sounds. The organization has established a strongly supported educational program with the Young Sandlapper Singers, the Katie Quackenbush Vocal Scholarship for high school students, and a Side-By-Side program for high school choral ensembles -- the next generation of Sandlapper Singers!

Jobs

Elementary Dance Teacher Vacancy

East Aiken School of the Arts in Aiken, SC is seeking a dance teacher with a dance education degree for the 2014-2015 school year. East Aiken School of the Arts is a fast-growing arts integration school serving students in grades 5k-5th. Apply online through the Aiken County Public School District website (click the "Job Opportunities" tab at the top of the page) or by contacting Heather Driver in Human Resources at 803-641-2463 or applicants@acpsd.net. The salary schedule is also located under the website's Job Opportunities tab.

Recognition

Milly

All it takes is a letter! Verner Awards nomination process simplified

The Verner Awards statue We've simplified the nomination process for the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts! It's easier than ever - all it takes is a letter.  Just e-mail, mail or hand deliver a letter of nomination by Nov. 3. The standards are still high -- the award recognizes outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina -- but the nomination process is streamlined. Help recognize South Carolina innovators, supporters and advocates of the arts with a nomination for the state's highest arts award! Nominations are accepted in these categories:

  • ARTS IN EDUCATION – open to S.C. individuals and institutions whose primary function is arts education. May include arts educators (teachers, consultants, principals, administrators), schools, school districts, college/university arts departments, etc.
  • ORGANIZATION – open to S.C. organizations that contribute to the advancement and/or support of the arts. May include arts discipline organizations, arts councils, arts advocacy groups, guilds, arts departments of organizations, educational institutions, etc.
  • GOVERNMENT – open to S.C. agencies and institutions generally described as units of state, county or municipal governments that have served their communities in outstanding ways through the arts, OR elected or appointed officials who, in their official capacities, have demonstrated notable support for the arts through leadership and public policy.
  • BUSINESS/FOUNDATION – open to SC individuals, or companies and foundations whose participation, support, and/or contributions have benefited the maintenance and growth of the arts.
  • INDIVIDUAL – open to S.C. individuals who have demonstrated exceptional achievement and statewide impact through their leadership, support, and advancement of the arts. May include arts professionals such as managers, administrators; or arts supporters such as patrons, promoters, donors, etc.
  • INDIVIDUAL ARTIST – open to S.C. artists of exceptional talent and creativity, in any discipline, whose contribution to the arts has helped guide and influence directions, trends and aesthetic practices across the state or to national or international levels
Find complete nomination guidelines online. Image: A hand-crafted bronze statue, designed by artist Jean McWhorter, is presented to each recipient.

Grantee Spotlight

Spartanburg Art Museum receives national support from the American Alliance of Museums

This fall the Spartanburg Art Museum will take part in the Museum Assessment Program (MAP) created in collaboration between the American Alliance of Museums and the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). “This is tremendous news for SAM,"said Elizabeth Goddard, executive director. “I have worked with both of these organizations in the past and feel very fortunate to have another opportunity to bring national standards of excellence to the work SAM is striving to accomplish.” The American Alliance of Museums mission is to nurture excellence in museums through advocacy and service. MAP: A Customized Roadmap for Improvement is a powerful tool designed to support museums of all sizes through a one-year process of self-assessment, institutional activities and consultative peer review. At the end of this process SAM will emerge with an analysis of its strengths, weaknesses and opportunities and a prioritized road map for improving operations and meeting standards. For the past 30 years, the MAP program has assisted more than 4,500 museums in strengthening operations, planning for the future and meeting standards. The IMLS-funded MAP grants provide $4,000 worth of consultative resources and services. “What these means specifically for SAM is a year of access to an online community with years of expertise rooted in national best practices, peer reviews, free webinars, national recognition, and a site visit, all designed to emphasize strategic planning and ensuring operations and resource alignment with our evolving mission," said Goddard. “This process will involve the staff and board of directors as we increase our knowledge together and improve our operations and build capacity for all of core components.” This is a pivotal time for the museum. Goddard is approaching the one-year mark as executive director, and the board of directors just welcomed new members Ryan Langley, Kerin Hannah, Sharon Butehorn, Cathy Bagwell, Epsie Coleman and Mary Ann Kotlarich. George Nixon, board president, is excited for SAM’s future, writing in a recent blog post: “SAM is helping us think – about ourselves and the world around us. Interactive places encourage children of all ages to experience art in non-traditional ways." SAM has a full fall season planned of new exhibitions, Art School classes and outreach sites serving youth throughout Spartanburg County during after school hours with the COLORS program. For more information, visit spartanburgartmuseum.org or call (864) 582-7616.

News

Charleston’s theater scene: keeping stage lights on a financial balancing act

From the Charleston City Paper:

Last month, a Summerville town councilman made waves in the local theater scene by trying to remove about $3,000 in funds directed to the Flowertown Players. He objected to the content of their 2013 production of the musical, Rent. But while his efforts to remove the accommodation tax funding failed, his actions beg the question: How much would the loss of $3,000 in funding affect a local theater? How much would it really hurt? To answer the question, we need a general picture of the economics of our local theaters and, to tell the truth, the picture changes from troupe to troupe — albeit slightly. We have theaters like Charleston Stage that pay upward of $250,000 per show, and we have smaller theaters like PURE Theatre or What If? that can keep production costs to under $20,000. To a larger theater, perhaps, $3,000 is a drop in the bucket, but no matter what, public funding is a big piece of the glue holding our theater community together. When it gets taken away, that money has to be found somewhere else in order for our theaters to thrive. Emily Wilhoit is the executive director of Theatre Charleston, an alliance of over a dozen local theaters. As such, she knows what's up, financially speaking. "The average nonprofit theater arts group budget income comes only from 50 percent tickets. The other 50 percent comes from grants, donations, and sponsorships," she says. Though those numbers can and do vary greatly. "All our theaters very much rely on grants, contributions, and sponsorships to run their seasons." Julian Wiles, founder and producing artistic director of Charleston Stage, arguably Charleston's largest theatrical group, agrees. "Ticket sales only make up about 47 percent of Charleston Stage's production costs. Without sponsors, donors, and public arts funding, Charleston Stage shows would all post a loss," he says. Smaller theaters, too, face the same challenge. At the PURE Theatre, a 100-seat blackbox, the numbers are closer to 54 percent tickets, 46 percent contributions, according to Managing Director Laurens Wilson. All our theaters, it seems, are reliant in large measure on funding received from methods other than ticket sales. So where does all that money go? Again, it varies greatly by theater and their season. At Charleston Stage, which is known for huge musical productions the money seems to flow to its employees. "The biggest costs are people. Although we use the most modern tools such as computers for sound, lights, set design, etc., theater is still very much a hand-made business and requires a lot of hands," says Wiles. "Over the course of a season we employ over 150 musicians, actors, directors, stage hands, choreographers, music directors, and production staff, costumers, scenery, lighting and sound designers, and technicians. As a professional theater all of these artists receive paid compensation." And then there's the royalty fee, which is the money paid for the right to be able to use a copyrighted script. "Royalties range from 10 percent to 13 percent of the gross," continues Wiles. "And royalties generally have to be paid in full before a single ticket is sold, so we are always taking a bit of a chance. For some shows we pay in excess of $30,000 for royalties." Over at PURE, things look similar, though on a smaller scale. Wilson says, "The biggest expense we have are artists. A show that has 10 actors is going to be more expensive than a show with two. If you look at the hard cost of the show alone, you're probably looking at around $15,000. That doesn't include staff salaries that would be applicable to the show." As Wiles said, it's a risk, every time. But are directors taking that into account, and only choosing shows that they think will sell well? You'd think so, but that's not always the case. Take PURE, a theater known for taking risks. Artistic Director Sharon Graci and the theater's board like to try all kinds of different plays. "Whether or not a show will be well-attended comes into consideration for sure," says Graci. "And we may make some adjustments to our season as a whole, knowing we're doing a show that won't be as accessible as another show. But it will never dictate our artistic selections." Some shows do better than expected. Russian Transport, PURE's February comedy about a Russian-Jewish immigrant family in Brooklyn attempting to live a perfect American life until uncle Boris arrives and upsets the balance, is one example. The play brought in far more in ticket sales than anticipated. However, other productions don't measure up, so theater directors make sure to plan each season carefully to at least average out. With ticket sales an unreliable form of income, the public funding and donor contributions become ever more important. Thus, the answer to our original question — How much would it hurt to lose $3,000 in public funding? — seems clear, at least to Wilson. "$3,000 would be impactful for anyone. We all fight for every dollar we get," she says. "In a market like Charleston, the pool of contributed income is limited. If you have something you're counting on like city money, and it goes away, it's often hard to go away and replace it."
Via: Charleston City Paper

Conferences

South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education conference set for October

The South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education is hosting its annual Arts Integration Conference Oct. 2 and 3 in Columbia at the Marriott, located at 1200 Hampton St.

For the past 12 years, SCAAE’s annual professional development conference has provided educators with an opportunity to learn how the arts effectively engage students. This year’s conference, The Arts Initiate Learning, will include sessions that address the role of arts integration in 2014’s biggest initiatives, including Common Core, Educator Evaluation, Student Assessment, the new Core Arts Standards, STEAM and Read to Succeed (Literacy Development).

Keynote speaker Lynn Tuttle is director of arts education at the Arizona Department of Education. Her duties include acting as a liaison to the state’s arts educators; providing professional development in Arizona’s Academic Arts Standards, arts assessment and arts integration; and promoting quality arts education programs in Arizona’s schools. She co-chaired the Arizona Arts Education Census Committee, which published the 2010 Arizona Arts Education Census, documenting access and availability of arts education in Arizona’s district and charter schools. She has keynoted for The Kennedy Center’s 2013 Partners in Education conference and the 2013 Biannual Maine Arts Education Conference, and has presented for Americans for the Arts, Arts Education Partnership, the Educational Theatre Association, the Kennedy Center Alliances for Arts Education Network, and other organizations.

An early-bird registration rate is available until Aug. 29. For more information or to register, visit the SCAAE's website.

Via: South Carolina Alliance for Arts Education