Jason Rapp

‘The show can’t go on’

P&C  reviews hard times in the arts


Hub readers know the devastation felt in South Carolina's arts community because of the pandemic's economic effects.

Know, though, the story is reaching broader audiences. Today, the Greenville outpost of the Post & Courier published a story that paints a bleak picture throughout the state. From the story:

“You know the old adage, ‘The show must go on.’ Well, this is one of those times when the show can’t go on,” said Graham Shaffer, technical director at the Greenville Theatre. “We just have to sit here until we can.”

Some hoped for salvation via a federal coronavirus relief package that hasn’t materialized. Now, the South Carolina Arts Commission has asked the state General Assembly to approve $3.8 million in nonrecurring funds to prop up the ailing industry until it can recover. Originally, the arts commission asked for that amount to help venues make repairs to aging buildings.

Now it just hopes to keep the buildings open.

Read Nate Cary's full story here. Subscription possibly required.

Jason Rapp

COVID-19 and the arts in South Carolina

A response resource for S.C.'s creative communities


COVID-19 molecular structure image An image of COVID-19, courtesy of CDC Artists and arts organizations in South Carolina will be affected by the worldwide outbreak of COVID-19, the 2019 Novel Coronavirus. Beyond reminding you to wash your hands (see more about that flier by an #SCartists below), the S.C. Arts Commission is going to leave the science to scientists and public health practitioners, but we can be a resource for the creative communities we serve. Our goal is to provide information that can enable our constituents to be ready for “What if…?” And let’s face it—there’s a lot of that right now. Ed. note; 13 March 2020, 16:00 ET The SCAC apologizes for the extra click, but because of the significant need for this content to be "living," we are now directing you to the COVID-19 resources page on SouthCarolinaArts.com which we are updating frequently.

Click here to access updated resources for creative communities compiled by the SCAC.

Submitted material

Award-winning S.C. poet to lead workshops in Georgetown Co.

Award-winning poet Marlanda Dekine, Sapient Soul, will lead a series of poetry writing workshops this October and November in her native Georgetown County.

Close up facial image of Marlanda Dekine, Sapient Soul Marlanda Dekine, Sapient Soul The workshops are scheduled for Wednesdays in October and November 2020 from 10-11:30 a.m. for the Georgetown County Library System (GCLS). Due to COVID-19, all sessions will be conducted online with the video-conferencing program, BlueJeans. The program is free and open to the public. However, space in the workshop is limited in order to give proper attention to all participants. To register, please contact, Dr. Dan Turner at 843.545.3363 or dturner@gtcounty.org. If you’re interested, don’t let technology stand in your way. GCLS has laptops and Wi-Fi hotspots available for patrons to check out.
The overall theme for the sessions is “Writing Wherever You Are” and offers a unique approach to writing poetry, one that can be of equal value for beginning and experienced poets. Dekine will bring in a selection of poems by accomplished and emerging South Carolina poets and then guide participants through key elements of these works. She will then discuss ways participants can incorporate these techniques into their own writing. Each individual session of the overall “Writing Wherever You Are” series has a distinct focus to provide participants with a diverse range of approaches and tools for creating poems. Individual session topics are listed below:
  • October 7: “The Blank Page”: Techniques to start writing
  • October 14: “Healing through Writing”: Cathartic approaches to generating individuality
  • October 21: “Voice & Tone”: Immersion in literature to speak truthfully and well
  • October 28: “Sound & Noise”: Consideration of the musicality of words
  • November 4: “Before We Wrote, We Spoke”: Vocal ways to recall oral traditions
The workshop series is funded by a Fast-Track Literary Grant from SC Humanities and the SCAC. The sessions are supported by the Friends of the Library groups at each of the four GCLS libraries: Georgetown, Waccamaw, Andrews, and Carvers Bay.
Marlanda Dekine-Sapient Soul is a poet and author from Plantersville. Her work has appeared in Emergence Magazine, Screen Door Review, Flycatcher Journal, Spark & Echo Arts, TEDxGreenville, and elsewhere. Previously, Marlanda studied in Paris with NYU’s Low-Residency MFA program and was a 2019 Fresh Voice of the Year, awarded by SC Humanities. Currently, she is an MFA candidate at Converse College. Marlanda believes in the power of being with poetry for collective healing and liberation.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: #SCartists as active as the tropics?

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


It isn't just the tropics that are active

Good soggy Thursday morning, Hub readers. As what's left of Sally creeps across South Carolina throughout the day and into tomorrow, take heart: despite everything tough weather and tough times, #SCartists are as busy as ever. Here's proof.
  • Columbia Metropolitan Airport (CAE, according to tickets) is back in "Tuning Up." The airport announced the selected artists for its 2020/2021 "Art in the Airport" program. Out of 115 submissions received from local artists eager to reflect the talents of the area arts community, four were selected to exhibit their artwork for the upcoming season:
      • Christopher Garvey (October 2020 – January 2021)
      • Ija Charles (February – May 2021)
      • Sonya Diimmler (June – September 2021)
      • Harold Branham (October 2021 – January 2022)
    "Once a traveler lands, these works of art will be the first artistic and cultural touchpoints to the region,” CAE's Kim Jamieson said. The exhibit location will be in the connector of the terminal, the walkway between the security checkpoint and the departure/arrival gates.
  • Camera taking high-resolution image of glass artwork in a studio settingFarther north and west on I-26, photographer Thomas Koenig and fused-glass artist Judy Martin are set to exhibit a collaborative work, Big In Glass, at Artists Collective | Spartanburg. The free and public exhibit will be open Oct. 6-31, 2020 Tuesdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Social distancing and other protocols will be practiced. Each artist is contributing 10-12 pieces of work. Martin will present a collection of fused glass creations especially made for this exhibit; Koenig will use macro photography (right) to present highly enlarged details of Martin’s work, giving the viewer a different perspective.


SCAC Fellow featured in Columbia

Back in the Midlands, 701 Center for Contemporary Art in Columbia has a familiar face on exhibit now through Oct. 26. Well, her work is exhibited, anyway. "Reigning" SCAC fellowship recipient in craft Valerie Zimany has And I was Covered in Blossoms in the gallery Wednesdays through Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Visitors are required to wear coverings over mouth and nose (You know who you are. - Ed.). Zimany, a chair and associate professor at Clemson, is a decorated ceramicist who was awarded her fellowship from the SCAC for FY2020.
 

Jason Rapp

Artists U/South Carolina launches Big Projects Club

Free program for ambitious artists with ambitious projects

Applications deadline: Thursday, October 1, 2020 man looking at a planning board
Big Projects Club provides eight months of support, community, and accountability for South Carolina artists pursuing ambitious goals. It is for artists who want to start (or transition) a major project or venture. Times of uncertainty and instability can be powerful moments to start something new. Rather than retreating to the familiar, hoping our old ways of working will sustain us, we can be visionary builders of our practice, and our communities, and our future. Let’s walk together. Big Projects Club is a community of practice for ambitious artists and ambitious projects. We move our own projects forward, and we actively propel each other’s work with support, brainstorming, and accountability. Do it on your terms. We have no opinion on what you should do. You’re an artist; you’re a genius at envisioning and manifesting. Your ambitions and definitions of success are your own.  BPC is here to move you forward on your terms.

Enrollment

12 artists, by application (applications due October 1, 2020). Artists will be selected by a panel of AU/SC facilitators.

Schedule

Eight monthly group sessions (ninety minutes on Zoom) and up to three one-on-ones with an AU/SC facilitator. The commitment + Attend all eight sessions, no exceptions. + Share your insights and ideas to help propel other artists’ projects. + Do the work. This is for artists who can devote at least eight hours a week to manifesting their Big Projects. Read more and apply here!

Jason Rapp

Hispanic Alliance launches ‘Noches de Cine’

A film festival for Hispanic Heritage Month


Groundbreaking film can serve many purposes: entertaining, inspiring, and broadening our view of the world.

Its highest achievement might be the generation of empathy. The camera’s lens bypasses our conscious defenses by placing us within the story and allowing us to experience it on a nearly visceral level--forcing us to reconcile this experience with our current views. It reorients us to greater truths. In Honor of Hispanic Heritage Month 2020, Hispanic Alliance and the South Carolina Arts Commission invite you to experience the stories, values, and struggles of Hispanic people through movies and documentaries curated by the Hispanic students of HOLA at Furman University. We include movies in Spanish and English, including docudramas, fantastical tales, and untold histories. The Noches de Cine Top 10 were chosen for their superior ability to elevate the perception of Hispanic and Latin art, and to inspire constructive dialogue on relevant issues. These films sculpt a three-dimensional model to replace our flat stereotypes of diverse Hispanic and Latin cultures, and the immigrant experience, in particular.​ Hispanic Heritage Month is celebrated from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15. To learn more, GVL Today has an excellent overview of events in that community written by The Hub's new friend Lindsey Tabor of Hispanic Alliance. Use "Noches de Cine" to guide your community’s celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month, as part of an educational curriculum, or for your own journey towards greater compassion and understanding through art.

Noches de Cine Top 10

Movies to watch during Hispanic Heritage Month
  • Immigration Nation (Netflix)
  • Street Food Latin America (Netflix)
  • McFarland, USA (Hulu)
  • The 33 (Netflix)
  • César Chávez (YouTube)
  • The Book of Life (Amazon Prime)
  • Underwater Dreams (Amazon Prime)
  • La Jaula De Oro/The Golden Dream (DVD on Amazon)
  • Underdogs (Netflix)
  • Frida (Netflix)
Subscriptions are required for most streaming services except YouTube. Click here to visit the Hispanic Alliance's Noches de Cine page for additional information on each film. (The Hub has already picked out a few. - Ed.) There is even a printable viewing guide available.

A new strategic partnership forged

South Carolina Arts Commission welcomes the Hispanic Alliance, based in Greenville, as a new strategic partner to enable better service for and outreach to the Latinx community in the Upstate and beyond. We similarly work with Art Pot in Hanahan for similar ventures in the Lowcountry. Collaborations like "Noches de Cine" increase our ability to work with underrepresented groups and artists.
Main page photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Jason Rapp

‘Black Artists of Spartanburg’ exhibition goes live

Chapman Cultural Center is excited to announce the Black Artists of Spartanburg exhibition.

After conversations with our community, the Black Artists of Spartanburg Exhibition was formed to amplify the voices of Spartanburg’s Black artists in response to the racial injustices that are taking place across the nation. The multi-media exhibition features 17 artists from across Spartanburg County and will be on display through Sept. 30. The event will feature a virtual panel discussion with select artists on Sept. 17 from 6-7 p.m. during Spartanburg Artwalk. The artwork will be on display inside the Carlos Dupre Moseley Building on the Chapman Cultural Center Campus, Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 6 p..m and Saturdays 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Those who are unable to attend the exhibit in person can view the exhibition virtually on the Chapman Cultural Center website. The artists featured in the exhibition include:
  • Kayla Cromer
  • Mylows Customs
  • James Goff
  • Spark Howard
  • Josh Jackson
  • Moses "Galaxy" Jenkins
  • Patricia Kabore
  • Chris Kelly
  • Smitha Lee
  • Quinn Long
  • Antonio Modesto Milian
  • Ariel Moore
  • Rosetta Nesbitt
  • Lady Pluuto
  • Arialle Kennedy Smith
  • THEMADDDARTIST
  • Frankie Zombie
The exhibition was juried by 2020 HUB-BUB Artists-in-Residence Masimba Hwati and Shuk Han Lui. More information about the jurors can be found here. “As a Black artist, but especially as a Black female artist, it's challenging to gain exposure and make connections in the art community. Therefore, the opportunity to be a part of this exhibition is an amazing experience and I definitely think it's a step in the right direction to raise awareness of the fact that there's a need for a larger community that supports artists of African diaspora,” Kayla Cromer said of her inclusion in the exhibition. Local artist Josh Jackson said, “I am blessed and honored to be chosen as one of the artists represented in the Black Artists of Spartanburg Exhibition. To me, this exhibition means that my community understands what’s going on, and cares enough to support Black artists through trying times. I appreciate the opportunity and I’m inspired by how the arts are being used for positivity in our community.”
The virtual panel discussion will be moderated by Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer for Spartanburg School District Seven, and Chapman Cultural Center Trustee, Dr. Carlotta Redish. The panel will discuss their experiences as Black artists, their work, and the overall importance the arts play in regards to social justice issues. Participating artists include: TheMadddArtist, Lady Pluuto, Patricia Kabore, Ariel Moore, Smitha Lee, Spark Howard, Antonio Modesto Milian, James “Edras” Goff, and Arialle Kennedy Smith. The panel will be streamed live on the Chapman Cultural Center Facebook page from 6-7 p.m. “This exhibition comes in response from the recent publicity of injustices done to the Black community across the nation. Although I know that one exhibition will not solve all issues, I hope that this can help spark conversations that will create change in the community,” said Jennifer Barskdale, Outreach Coordinator for Chapman Cultural Center. Through this exhibition, Chapman Cultural Center hopes that Spartanburg County will use it as an opportunity to recognize and celebrate the perspectives of our Black community while building bridges toward understanding. “Our mission is to provide cultural leadership and we have many people of color working in our organization and serving on our Board who help us make important decisions to advance equity and inclusion in the arts locally. It is during difficult times that it is most important for the arts to provide hope and healing. This can be done in so many ways and lifting up our local professional Black artists through this public exhibit is hopefully a positive step,” said Jennifer Evins, president & CEO of Chapman Cultural Center.

About Chapman Cultural Center

Chapman Cultural Center provides cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community. Chapman Cultural Center is located on East Saint John St in downtown Spartanburg. Please visit www.ChapmanCulturalCenter.org for more information.

Jason Rapp

New Augusta Sculpture Trail issues national call for art

10 works to be exhibited for two years


Cross-river Augusta, Georgia is joining a national array of cities that bring new art into public spaces through the temporary lease of outdoor sculptures.

Local artists and artists from across the country are invited to submit images and physical specifications for their ready-to-install, original sculptures. As the public art agency for the city of Augusta, the Greater Augusta Arts Council is seeking 10 leasable, pre-existing, outdoor sculptures to be installed for a duration of two years in Downtown Augusta as part of the new Augusta Sculpture Trail. These sculptures will be placed at intervals downtown that will create a fun and easy outdoor walking trail. The 10 selected locations use city of Augusta sidewalks for access, making them fully accessible for everyone to enjoy. The Arts Council will produce a digital walking tour that can be accessed from any mobile device which will help visitors learn specifics about each work of art and artist while they explore the Sculpture Trail. There will also be fun monthly Sculpture Trail events tied to the public artwork locations.

About the call for art

All sculpture sites will have a 4’x4’ concrete base and are spaced in a manner to promote walking from one sculpture to another, creating a trail to follow. Some basic requirements include that the work must be structurally sound and must be of a scale large enough to be clearly visible from a distance. It also must be capable of withstanding adverse weather conditions common to the Augusta River region. The work must be safe for public display and not include sharp or easily scalable parts. Selected artists will receive a stipend of $3,000 for the 2-year lease of their work ($1,500 upon installation, $1,500 upon de-installation). One piece of art will be purchased at the end of the installation to add to the city's permanent art collection. The call for entries is open now through Oct. 8, 2020. Selected artists will be notified by Oct. 30 and installations will begin January 15-30, 2021. Artists may apply up to three (3) times with separate works. For questions regarding applications email pax@augustaarts.com. The application is online at https://artist.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=8041. The Augusta Sculpture Trail is part of a larger Public Art Master Plan for the City of Augusta. It is intended to create a walkable art trail designed for promotion to attract local and regional visitors to the Downtown Augusta area.

Jason Rapp

Arts Education Partnership report lauds ABC Project in S.C.

AEP report 'reflects back and projects forward'


Over 25 years ago, the U.S. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Arts partnered with the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and Council of Chief State School Officers to create the Arts Education Partnership (AEP) to ensure that all students have equitable access to an excellent arts education.​ - AEP report


A new report from AEP takes a long look at the genesis of the partnership. While it's no surprise to those involved in the work, casual readers might be surprised to know that South Carolina and a few South Carolinians at the right place at the right time figured mightily in how everything came together on a national level. In a Part 2 of the report, former SCAC Executive Director Scott Shanklin-Peterson and Dr. Terry Peterson recount work with Dick Riley in Columbia as governor and Washington as President Clinton's education secretary to get the arts included in sweeping educational reforms in the 1980s and 1990s. The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is extremely proud of the ongoing work of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, a national model for integrating the arts into K-12 curriculum discussed at length in the AEP report. Together with the South Carolina Dept. of Education and the Winthrop University College of Visual and Performing Arts, the ABC Project continues serving the Palmetto State 31 years after starting and 33 years after the SCAC received a $20,000 Arts in Schools Basic Education planning grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to develop the it. Read the full report here.

Jason Rapp

Val Dunn named 2020 winner of the Trustus Playwrights’ Festival

Get a preview with online reading event this month


Trustus Theatre has named Down in the Holler by Val Dunn the winner of the 2020 Trustus Playwrights’ Festival, an annual national new works competition that was founded by the theatre in 1988.

Trustus TheatreThe theatre will present a free, online reading reading of the winning script on its website Saturday, Sept. 26 at 2 p.m. Here is a synopsis:

As the play begins, audiences are transported to a holler in the Shenandoah Valley. Juniper prepares to spend a perfect life in a perfect cabin with her perfect partner, Blake. That is, until Maeve appears in the doorway. Telling tall tales and crooning high lonesomes, Maeve beguiles Juniper's return to Gin—a past self who once lived and loved in this here house. As Juniper attempts to exorcise her pursuit of passion and maintain the stable life she's created with Blake, Down in the Holler witnesses a collision of class and queerness, ultimately asking how we reconcile who we were and who we thought we would become.

Trustus Theatre received more than 800 submissions to the 2020 Trustus Playwrights’ Festival. The Festival Selection Committee, comprised of Trustus company members, selected Dunn’s work. The winning script is traditionally produced as a part of Trustus’ Main Stage subscriber season the year after it is named the winner, however Trustus leadership expects this script to be staged in Summer 2022 because of the pandemic. After the reading event on Sept. 26, the show’s production team, including director Dewey Scott-Wiley, will work with the playwright over the next two years to finalize the script for production.
Val Dunn is a writer/deviser who creates plays, performance art, and rituals. Her work possesses a strong sense of place and tackles issues of feminism and queerness while pushing against the limitations of form. She is a member playwright of Azuka’s New Pages, Writers on the Rocks, and an alumna of the Foundry @ PlayPenn. She has received developmental support from the Orchard Project (Core Company), Signal Fire, Centrum, the Bearded Ladies Cabaret, and SANDBOX. Val holds a bachelor's with honors in drama and English from Washington College where she received the Stewart Award for Drama, The Mary Martin Prize, The Jude & Miriam Pfister Poetry Prize, The William W. Warner Prize for Writing on the Environment, The Literary House Genre Fiction Prize, and was a finalist for the Sophie Kerr prize in Literature. Val has also created zines about depression, the border crisis, and late-stage capitalism.
Directed by Trustus Company Member Dewey Scott-Wiley, Down in the Holler will feature the acting talents of Christine Hellman (Juniper), Susan Swavely (Gin), Katie Leitner (Maeve), and Tashera Pravato (Blake). Virtual scenic and lighting design will be created by Trustus staff members Curtis Smoak and Sam Hetler, editing will be done by staff member Abigail McNeely, and Producing Artistic Director Chad Henderson will be composing the additional media used to provide contextual imagery. This reading event will also feature music by Columbia folk bands The Prairie Willows and Post-Timey String Band. “We’re getting very energized about creating virtual events,” said Producing Artistic Director Chad Henderson. “This reading of Down in the Holler will allow us to share Val’s script with our fans and followers—a show we deeply believe in and look forward to producing. This event also gives us a chance to play and stir our creative impulses. Director Dewey Scott-Wiley has embraced this new format for theatrical experience, and with the addition of virtual backgrounds, sound design, music, and film—I think this reading is going to offer much more than one would expect.”

Submitted material

ArtFields calls for artists to compete, exhibit

Nine-day, town-wide event plans for 2021

Submission deadline: Sunday, November 1, 2020

From September 1 through November 1, 2020, Southeastern artists, both emerging and established, are invited to apply for ArtFields, an annual, nine-day art competition and exhibition in Lake City, South Carolina.

Each year, ArtFields brings together art lovers, collectors, and curators who come to see Lake City transform into a town-wide gallery, allowing accepted artists to be part of the celebration while they compete for $100,000 in prizes. ArtFields started in 2013 with a simple goal: honor Southeastern artists with nearly two weeks worth of celebration and competition in the heart of Lake City—a small, once agrarian South Carolina town. To date, ArtFields has awarded over $800,000 in prize money, helped launch the careers of countless artists, and ultimately led to Lake City’s transformation into a burgeoning arts mecca. Adult artists of all media, who live in the competition's 12 participating Southern states are welcome to apply. Prizes and rules details are available via the ArtFields website.

Prizes and Quick Facts

Submissions Timeline:
  • Entries Open – Sept. 1-Nov. 1, 2020
  • Accepted Artists Notified – Dec 2020
  • ArtFields 2021 – April 23-May 1, 2021
Prizes at Stake:
  • Grand Prize – $50,000
  • Second Place – $25,000
  • People’s Choice 2D – $12,500
  • People’s Choice 3D – $12,500