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Free ‘SC.FELLOWS Part II” lunch and learn sessions resume Wednesday

[caption id="attachment_35465" align="alignright" width="235"] Heidi Darr-Hope, Goddess Series-Pathway[/caption] Last week's premiere lunch and learn session for the SC.FELLOWS Part II exhibition saw good turnout, and more is expected Wednesday for round two. Fellowship recipient Paula Smith (2004) gave a talk to around 20 eager arts lovers. Nick Boismenu from the S.C. Arts Commission facilitated. This Wednesday is the second of the three-talk series. Make plans to visit the Ponder Gallery at Benedict College (1600 Harden St., Columbia) to hear more from 1982 fellow Heidi Darr-Hope and facilitator Wendell Brown, who is the gallery director. The talk starts at 12:30 p.m., is free, and you're encouraged to bring lunch. Reservations are required. UPDATE 19 June, 13:45: We're disappointed to announce that this event is canceled and will not be rescheduled. Please plan to join fellow Bob Lyon and Harriett Green from SCAC for the final session June 26th from 12:30-1:30 p.m. Get more information from this Hub post announcing the series.


SC.FELLOWS Part II is a joint project of the Ponder Gallery, 701 Center for Contemporary Art and the South Carolina Arts Commission. For hours and more information about Part II at 701 CCA, please visit www.701cca.org.

So, what would you say you do here?

[caption id="attachment_35603" align="aligncenter" width="600"] "The Bobs" from Office Space, 1999 by Twentieth Century Fox and Cubicle, Inc.[/caption] There's not a quick answer to that question, but let's start with this: The South Carolina Arts Commission does three things:

  • artist development,
  • community arts development,
  • and arts education
through four means:
  • direct programs,
  • staff assistance,
  • partnerships,
  • and grants.

The Hub serves as… a hub for the promotion of news items related to all those things. (The “Arts Daily” section serves as a centralized - what’s the word? - hub for promoting statewide arts events.) On a given week, you can see posts that serve to promote any number of those things. It’s critical for this outlet to do that because if you’re a tax-paying South Carolinian, your income comes to Columbia through the Department of Revenue and can return to your community from our agency by those four means. For the current fiscal year that ends in two weeks, we’ve helped provide one, some, or all the three things we do to all 46 counties. Barbara Streeter In short, we use The Hub to tell you how we’re attempting to be good stewards for your money. It’s not an election-year gimmick, but it’s here every year, on as many days as workload allows. The programs, artists, and ventures are not just lofty ones perched on the peak of Mount Olympus. No, we’re also using arts and culture to make Allendale, Bamberg, Barnwell, Colleton, Hampton, and Jasper counties feel like they have a slice of the peak as new perspectives converge to address old problems. We help schools integrate the arts (top, right) into their curricula to foster creativity and critical thinking in new generations. We also enable artists to contribute to a $9.7 billion sector of the state economy by helping them not only further, but monetize their skills (bottom, right) to provide themselves sustainable income. That’s where your money goes, and it’s important for you to know that all the time, not just when differing opinions on funding collide - because it’s your money, entrusted to our professionals to impact all South Carolinians.
Two things you might have noticed here and/or our social media outlets lately are renewed emphasis on a) promoting what “SC Artists” are doing (spoiler alert: they are a wildly successful lot) and b) how “SCAC Grants At Work” are being put to work. Here is today’s example, which happens to encompass both. The grantee artists used an S.C. Arts Commission grant to take an art form often assumed to be reserved for Olympus right to Main Street: Here’s to seeing plenty more of this, all the time.

Greenville Center for Creative Arts issues call for instructors

Greenville Center for Creative Arts is currently seeking proposals from teaching artists for fall 2018 class sessions. They are looking for artists doing interesting work who are also excellent teachers. GCCA instructors include both working artists and professional educators who possess a willingness to communicate technique and process, strong technical skills, good interpersonal skills, and the ability to teach classes that are open to a range of skill levels, from intermediate to advanced. Proposals can range from six-week classes to one-day, two-day and three-day workshops. Interested? GCCA suggests taking a look at the 2018/2019 class session schedule and their upcoming deadlines for instructor proposals (below). For more information and/or to submit a proposal, click here. Director your questions to Art School Director Liz Rundorff Smith at liz@artcentergreenville.org or call 864.735.3948.


FALL 2018
  • Instructor Proposals Deadline: June 21, 2018
  • Fall Session I: Sept. 10 - Oct. 21, 2018 | Fall Session II: Oct. 29 - Dec. 8, 2018
WINTER 2019
  • Instructor Proposals Deadline: Oct. 18, 2018 
  • Winter Session I: Jan. 7 - Feb. 17, 2019 | Winter Session II: Feb. 25 - April 7, 2019
SPRING 2019
  • Instructor Proposals Deadline: Jan. 17, 2019
  • Spring Session: April 16 - May 25, 2018

Submitted material

CAE exhibit features artist Kimara London

A new art exhibit featuring local artist Kimara London is now on display at Columbia Metropolitan Airport (CAE). "We’re especially excited about this exhibit as Kimara is a member of our CAE team and works as a ticket agent with United Airlines. Travelers can view her artwork located in the connector between the main lobby and the departure gates," a CAE spokesperson said. As a professional portrait artist, painter, and ceramist, Kimara has provided the Carolinas with her “gift” of creating life-like designs through her business Kimara London Fine Art. She is a graduate of the University of South Carolina with a bachelor's in studio art. Her murals can be seen at local businesses in Columbia, and she's also completed several commissioned murals. Specializing in portrait art, Kimara creates realistic drawings from personal sittings as well as from photos. She expresses her creativity in media such as oil, acrylic and charcoal and connects her subject matter to the canvas in a way that brings it alive and captures viewers’ attention. Kimara believes that everyone has a God-given gift and "it’s just a matter of discovering it."

Tuning Up: Journey to Juilliard, SCGSAH expansion

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Journey to Juilliard. After facing adversity from the moment he was born, Midlands teen Robert Mason, a student at the S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH), found his passion and stuck with it. Now it's paying off: Mason will be on his way this fall to study at one of the most prestigious performing arts programs in the country. He sat down with WIS-TV to share more about his about his journey to Juilliard School and his passion for dancing. SCGSAH expansion to add music building. SCGSAH officials broke ground last week on a new 10,000-square-foot building for the school’s music department. The planned two-story building will include additional studios, practice rooms, large ensemble spaces and humidity-controlled instrument storage space. The S.C. General Assembly appropriated $4.31 million dollars for this project, which the school expects will take one year to complete. A "Grants Roundup" note. During times when there are no grant applications due within a ~30-day window, The Hub does not run "Grants Roundup."

West Main Artists Co-op to exhibit ‘Mac’ Boggs retrospective

A lifetime of work by one of Spartanburg’s most celebrated artists – the late Mayo “Mac” Boggs – is being retrospectively exhibited at West Main Artists Co-op through June 16 to celebrate 43 years of international recognition and acclaim. This extensive collection of sculptures and 2-dimensional works-of-art -- “Mac Boggs: A Retrospective” -- can be seen at no charge Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at 578 West Main St., Spartanburg, in the Co-op’s Venue gallery. [caption id="attachment_35333" align="alignright" width="150"] "A Green Season: The Activation of Space"
Mac Boggs
Metal sculpture[/caption] “This [is] West Main’s most important exhibit for the year,” Venue Committee Chair Dwight Rose said. “There is probably no other Spartanburg artist who has achieved as much recognition and respect as Mac Boggs. His work is literally around the world.” Boggs’ widow, Dr. Ansley Boggs, worked with Rose to curate this retrospective exhibit at the Co-op. Boggs passed away in 2014, at the age of 71. At that time, he was retired from teaching art at Converse College, where he retained the distinction of professor emeritus of art. The exhibit will include many abstract and non-representational metal and bronze sculptures, for which he is most known. However, the exhibit will also have marble constructions, paintings, computer graphics, prints, photographs of commissioned art, sketches of proposed sculpture, awards, newspaper articles, models of proposals, and letters from students and colleagues. “I hope that people appreciate Mac’s amazing versatility and creativity, as well as sense his inspiration, enthusiasm and passion for creating art and teaching,” Ansley Boggs said.


[caption id="attachment_35334" align="alignright" width="200"] "Talisman"
Mac Boggs
Metal sculpture[/caption] Mac Boggs was born and raised in Ashland, Ky. He earned a bachelor’s in art from the University of Kentucky and a master’s of fine arts (sculpture) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. From 1970-2013, Mr. Boggs was the professor of sculpture at Converse College in Spartanburg. He received numerous awards and honors, and in 1991, he was named Honorary Artist of Spartanburg by proclamation of the Mayor. In 2000, the Mayor proclaimed a “Mayo ‘Mac’ Boggs Day.” In 2008, he was selected to serve as a Technical Collaborator for the Lynne Streeter Art and Marble Stone-carving Summer Workshop of Pietrasanta, Italy. In 2010, Mr. Boggs was honored by Converse College, Wofford College, and USC-Upstate with a 40-year retrospective exhibition on each of the three campuses. And in 2013, he received the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts, South Carolina's highest arts award. [caption id="attachment_35335" align="alignright" width="250"] Mac Boggs receives the Verner Award from then-Speaker Bobby Harrell in 2013.[/caption] He was best known for his metal sculptures in steel, stainless steel, and bronze. His work is in the presidential libraries of former U.S. presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter and can be found internationally in permanent collections of numerous corporations. In addition, he has received sculpture commissions for public parks, libraries, college campuses, schools, local businesses, and private residences, two of which were for the home of the author, Lillian Jackson Braun. Mr. Boggs also carved marble and soapstone, and exhibited his photography and digital art. He frequently participated in local, regional, national, and international exhibitions. Also, he often served as a guest speaker for lecture-demonstrations. All the work in the Co-op exhibit will be on sale, ranging in price from $125 to $2,500 and all proceeds will be donated to the development of the Mac and Ansley Boggs Travel Scholarship Fund for Converse College art and education majors who do not have the financial means to travel. Mr. Boggs believed strongly in the importance of travel to a student’s art and life, Ansley Boggs said.
For more information about the Mac Boggs retrospective art exhibit at West Main Artists Co-op, please visit WestMainArtists.org.  

Tuning Up: Vintage Mary Edna, SEPF + more

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Vintage Mary Edna. South Carolina artist Mary Edna Fraser was a 1998/1999 S.C. Arts Commission Visual Arts Fellow and is a recent (2016) winner of the Verner Award in the artist category. As you can probably tell by her website, she's also an entrepreneur (and received an Artists Ventures Initiative grant from SCAC to that end). She's further proof that South Carolina artists and creatives are out there killing it every day. But here's something really cool: Tres Acres Vineyards of Argentina commissioned Mary Edna to make a batik for their label design. The wine is not yet available in the U.S. (sorry). How many people can lay claim to such an honor? Congrats (again), Mary Edna. Check out Family Ties, her new exhibition in Charleston "co-starring" her artist daughters Reba West Fraser and Labanna Babalon, starting Friday and running through July 29. Keys to Happiness. The piano event of the summer returns to Columbia June 17-23. Tickets are on sale now for all events at the 2018 Southeastern Piano Festival, led by Artistic Directors Marina Lomazov and Joseph Rackers. Pianist Simone Dinnerstein is the headlining guest artist. Bob Jones University Museum & Gallery: Call for Art! The 3rd annual M&G Makers Market opened its application process yesterday to BJU grads, current or former students, or current or former faculty/staff members. M&G has 30 positions available for makers in the following categories: 2D Fine Art, 3D Fine Art, To Wear, Paper Goods, Fiber Art, and Everything Else. Submit your application through midnight on June 10. Learn more here. And, if you’re not a grad or an artist, the university invites everyone to consider attending M&G’s 3rd annual Makers Market on Saturday, Oct. 13, 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

Submitted material

13th Annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition Winners Announced

Sculpture artists from across the nation applied to the 13th Annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition, displayed at the North Charleston Riverfront Park and presented as a component of the 2018 North Charleston Arts Fest. Organized annually by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, this unique, eleven-month exhibition offers established and emerging artists the opportunity to display their thought provoking, extraordinary sculptures, as well as compete for up to $19,750 in honorariums and awards. Thirteen out of 94 submissions were pre-juried into the exhibition by the juror, Lilly Wei, New York-based independent curator, writer, journalist, lecturer, and critic. Once installed at the exhibition site, Wei then made her selections for Best in Show, Outstanding Merit, and Honorable Mentions. The sculptures selected for exhibition are by 13 artists from 10 states. Congratulations to the winners of the 2018/2019 National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition:

  • Best in Show: Vuida by Joni Youkins-Herzog (Athens, Ga.; shown at right)
  • Outstanding Merit: Yellowfish by John Ross (Long Branch, N.J.)
  • Honorable Mention: Hallelujah by Charlie Brouwer (Willis, Va.)
  • Honorable Mention: Battery No. 1 by Lena Daly (Los Angeles, Calif.)
  • Honorable Mention: Moonlight Sonata by Hanna Jubran (Grimesland, N.C.)
Also displayed were the following pre-juried works:
  • The Sound of Everything - Bassoon by Sean Cassidy (Rock Hill)
  • Wind by Bob Doster (Lancaster)
  • Electric Horse by Normon Greene (Brentwood, Md.)
  • Ollie's Buoy by Roger Halligan (Chattanooga, Tenn.)
  • Gothic Family by Beau Lyday (Valdese, N.C.)
  • Oculi Aqua by Carmen Rojas (Ocala, Fla.)
  • The Wealth of Fools by Gregory Smith (North Pownal, Vt.)
  • Core Oracle by Adam Walls (Hope Mills, N.C.)
Sculpture sites are located throughout North Charleston Riverfront Park (1001 Everglades Ave.) on the former Charleston Naval Base. The park is open daily during daylight hours. Admission and parking are free. The 2018/2019 National Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition will be on display through March 24, 2019. For more information or to be added to the application mailing list for the 2019/2020 competition, please call the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843.740.5854 or email culturalarts@northcharleston.org. For more information on the sculpture exhibition, visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com.
After determining the award winners, Lilly Wei offered the following juror’s statement: "I would like to begin by congratulating all the artists in this wonderful exhibition and wishing you much success. It is never easy to choose and even more difficult to select just one “best in show,” and one “outstanding merit” but it is good that a few others can be singled out also. I would further state the obvious, that these endeavors are inevitably subjective, influenced by the juror’s own inclinations and criteria, conscious and unconscious. I would add that these are my readings of the works, not necessarily those of the artists although that is what art should do—evoke myriad responses from its viewers. That said, Joni Younkins-Herzog’s Vuida earned Best inShow. I very much liked its playfulness and a subversive feminism that quickly shifted into the feminist, as the flower became a trumpet of sorts, a loudspeaker, perhaps, that says that flowers, (and women) should speak out, boldly broadcasting messages that need to be heard. She upends a traditional still life vanitas motif about ephemerality into something more political, activist, and of the moment."

Ment Nelson brings pride of place to ‘Souf Cak’

It's a great day in South Carolina Souf Cak. One can easily envision that phrase appearing among Ment Nelson's tweets at some point, if it's not in the 3,100+ already tweeted. His mission statement on the social media platform is "I make it cool to be from South Carolina," so we posit that our lede is not a stretch. But don't take The Hub's word for it; the Post & Courier undoubtedly has more cachet and on Monday made the case for Nelson's innate coolness with a wonderful story you should read if you haven't already:

As an emerging artist who has gone from bagging groceries to collaborating on a New York gallery show in the span of two years, Nelson doesn't draw a line between his portraits, his hip-hop songwriting, his computerized artwork and his ebullient social-media presence. He'll use any format that gets the job done, up to and including posing for a selfie with a roost full of chickens.
Hat tip to P&C writer Paul Bowers. Artists from South Carolina are certainly germane to a Hub story, but Ment is also working on a new initiative we're going to begin talking about soon called "Create: Rural S.C." The S.C. Arts Commission will lead research on South Carolina’s creative cluster, with a deeper examination of the creative economy in the state’s rural Promise Zone (Barnwell, Bamberg, Allendale, Hampton, Jasper, Colleton Counties), a priority community of the USDA-RD (the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Rural Development). A cohort of “Next Generation” creative professionals in the Promise Zone will assist in all aspects of the development and roll-out of the plan. This program is an outgrowth of the SCAC's "The Art of Community: Rural S.C." initiative, which is active in each of the Promise Zone counties as the umbrella organization for this program and already bearing fruit in the region. Hear more from the young voices of "Create: Rural S.C." in this video. YOUNG VOICES VIDEO 5 MINUTES from Cook Productions on Vimeo.  

Visual artists featured in ‘SC.Fellows Part 2’

The final official events of the S.C. Arts Commission's 50th anniversary celebration are underway in Columbia and Spartanburg as three exhibitions that are part of "SC.Fellows Part 2" run concurrently. Works by a host of visual arts fellows past and present are  up for public display in a retrospective exhibition of SCAC Visual Arts and Craft Fellows covering 1976 to the present day.


Columbia

The 701 Center for Contemporary Art (701 Whaley St.) has the biggest collection, displaying works by James Arendt, Alice Ballard, Patti Brady, Jonathan Brilliant, Zoey Brookshire, Jeri Burdick, Jarod Charzewski, Jocelyn Chateauvert, Rebecca Des Marais, Linda Fantuzzo, Mark Flowers, Jack Steve Gerstner, J. Scott Goldsmith, Kristi Higby, Elizabeth Keller, Mike Lavine, Larry Lebby, Elizabeth Melton, Philip Mullen, Jane Allen Nodine, Jorge Otero, Herb Parker, Clifton Peacock, Michael Phillips, David Ross Puls, Michael Tice, and Susan B. Wooten. 701 CCA is open Wednesday-Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-5 p.m. [caption id="attachment_35234" align="alignright" width="225"] "Laced Landscape" (detail) Kim Keats[/caption] The Henry Ponder Gallery at Benedict College (1600 Harden St.) opens with a reception tonight and will display works by Alice Boyle, M. Tallon Chalmers, Dennis Croteau, Heidi Darr Hope, Karen E. Davies, Mary Edna Fraser, Eugene Horne, Damond Howard, Judy V. Jones, Kim Keats, Peter Lenzo, Robert Lyon, Leo Manske, Paula Smith, Megan Wolfe, and Howard Woody. The Ponder Gallery is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.   Both exhibitions run through June 24.

Spartanburg

Artist Jonathan Brilliant is the sole fellow in focus at Spartanburg Art Museum (200 E. St. John St.) beginning today and running through Aug. 5.  SAM is open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 1-5 p.m.