State Art Collection travels to Anderson

The Anderson Arts Center will exhibit 24 works from State Art Collection: Contemporary Conversations Part I and II  Sept. 9 through Nov. 11, 2016.  The exhibition opens Friday, Sept. 9 at 7 p.m., during State of the Art: The Art and Soul of South Carolina, an event that also features a preview of works in the 2016 Anderson Arts Auction. Gallery hours are 9:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday.

Elizabeth Keller, Discerning of Spirits Elizabeth Keller, Discerning of Spirits Curated by Eleanor Heartney, author and contributing editor to Art in America and Artpress, Contemporary Conversations is composed of 118 works by 95 contemporary South Carolina artists. The exhibition is designed to suggest both the quality and diversity of the state’s cultural heritage and includes everything from hard-edge geometric abstraction to surrealist-tinged dreamscapes. Works are inspired by social issues, memory, local and national history, imagination, art of the past and aesthetic theory. Together they reflect the many voices and diverse concerns of South Carolina artists. The art in Contemporary Conversations is drawn from the State Art Collection, a comprehensive public collection of works by contemporary South Carolina artists. Established in 1967 as one of the first programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission, the State Art Collection is composed of 493 works in a variety of media and styles produced by 287 artists. Organizations and businesses interested in hosting an exhibition or displaying works from the State Art Collection should contact Harriett Green at (803) 734-8696. In addition toContemporary Conversations, two other traveling exhibitions are available: The African American Voice and Points of Departure: Vessel Forms from the State Art Collection. Images: State Art Collection: Contemporary Conversations About the State Art Collection The State Art Collection is considered the most comprehensive public collection of works by contemporary South Carolina artists. Established in 1967 as one of the first programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission, the State Art Collection has grown to include 493 works in a variety of media and styles by 287 South Carolina contemporary artists. Small exhibitions featuring work from the collection are organized on a regular basis for rural and isolated areas inside and outside of the state. Works from the State Art Collection are available for loan to art museums, state agencies, and public and private organizations for the purpose of public exhibition or public display. The collection is supported in part by the South Carolina Arts Foundation and First Citizens.

Jewelry created for History Channel’s ‘Vikings’ to be featured at S.C. Arts Gala

Fans of the History Channel's Vikings take note: you can go home from the South Carolina Arts Gala wearing Lagertha's barrettes or Ragnar's bracelet. Viking actress Katheryn Winnick as Lagertha looking fierce in her Danny Hansen-designed hair pieces. Batesburg-Leesville craftsman Danny Hansen, who has designed and created much of the distinctive jewelry worn by the popular drama's actors, will take part in the South Carolina Arts Gala art sale on May 11. In addition to bronze hair adornments and a silver dragon bracelet, Hansen will offer a silver Triskele (an ancient Celtic symbol) pendant and a bronze dragon belt buckle set -- pieces similar to items Hansen created for Vikings.

Hansen shipped off his bronze dragon-head bracelets to Vikings creators on a whim. The bracelets quickly became a featured object worn by main characters Ragnar and Aethelstan. The show's fans took notice and bracelet sales soared on Hansen's Crafty Celts website.

According to Hansen, the handmade barrettes "came out of a collaboration with the costuming department for Vikings. They needed hair pieces for a costume concept they had using our Hound and Doe cloak clasps. We developed these designs, as well as our Stag cloak clasp, into hair barrettes." Hansen has first-hand knowledge of how those costume concepts are realized -- he and his son, Kelley, traveled to Ireland to work as extras on the show. Presented by the South Carolina Arts Foundation, the art sale will also offer paintings, glass, pottery, sculpture, fiber arts and other original works of art, plus arts "experiences" created to showcase cultural and culinary arts.The sale is the perfect time to meet and mingle with artists as you ponder which piece to add to your art collection. All proceeds benefit the arts in schools and communities around the state through the South Carolina Arts Commission’s arts education and arts development programs. Last year, the S.C. Arts Foundation contributed more than $55,000 to bolster programs such as artist fellowships, arts education and artist training. The South Carolina Arts Gala, the celebration of the South Carolina Arts Awards, takes place May 11 at 7:15 p.m. at 701 Whaley St. in Columbia. Prior to the gala, enjoy a concert featuring bluegrass and gospel, plus recognition of Verner and Folk Heritage Award recipients. The concert and awards recognition take place at 6:15 p.m. in the Granby Room, 701 Whaley Street (in the same building as the gala). Tickets are $75 per person and may be purchased online with a credit card or check, or by calling (803) 734.8696. Reserve your tickets today!

S.C. Arts Gala set for May 11!

Time to buy your tickets! Mark May 11 on your calendar and reserve your tickets for the annual  South Carolina Arts Gala! The South Carolina Arts Foundation invites you to celebrate the South Carolina Arts Awards at the pre-gala recognition ceremony, which kicks off the evening at 6:15 p.m. in the Granby Room, 701 Whaley Street (in the same building as the gala) in Columbia. The gala and an art sale — featuring  fabulous art and food — begin at 7:15 p.m. in the Grand Hall of 701 Whaley (701 Whaley St.). The awards ceremony honors the recipients of the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts and the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards (2016 recipients to be announced soon). The art sale features original one-of-a-kind artworks by some of South Carolina’s finest contemporary artists, including functional and non-functional craft, paintings and sculpture. Seasoned and beginning collectors alike will find “must have” works and enjoy meeting artists. The South Carolina Arts Foundation designates gala proceeds to help support arts education, artist development and other programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission. Don’t miss the arts party of the year! Tickets are $75 each. Reserve your ticket(s) today!

Milly

The art’s in the mail: Halsey Institute exhibition showcases correspondence art

The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, located in Charleston, S.C., received a South Carolina Arts Commission Arts Education Project grant to help support this exhibition. “You’ve got mail” has different meanings, depending upon one’s age and current communications style.  The Halsey Institute’s exhibition, Correspondence Art: Words, Objects, and Images by Ray Johnson, Richard C., and Bob Ray, will appeal to those nostalgic for a time when keeping in touch could mean waiting a day or more for letter delivery, while also introducing the concept of creating and mailing art to young people accustomed to reaching their friends instantly via text. Also known as postal art and mail art, correspondence art is a populist artistic movement centered on sending small-scale works through the postal service. It initially grew out of the Fluxus movement in the 1950s and 1960s and has since developed into a global movement that continues to present day. “This exhibition brings together three of the most prolific mail artists in the history of the genre,” said Halsey Director and Chief Curator Mark Sloan. “There have been many well-known artists who have dabbled in mail art -- On Kawara, Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, Andy Warhol, etc. -- but very little scholarly attention has been given to the genre.” Halsey Institute Education Coordinator Maya McGauley Halsey Institute Education Coordinator Maya McGauley sorts through some of the mail art received Conceptual artist Ray Johnson (1927–1995) was a mail art pioneer, using a variety of graphic and textual elements to correspond with artists, writers, and thinkers, including Richard C. and Bob Ray. Vintage mail art between these three artists forms the historical backdrop for the exhibition, with the remaining works consisting of words, objects and images sent to Sloan by Richard C. and Bob Ray in the past year. A number of the works are collaborations between these two artists. Sloan believes the exhibition will rekindle the sense of wonder of sending and receiving postal mail. “The concept of pen pals seems so old-fashioned for most people under 50. People over 50 will recall those wistful days when people actually sent hand-written thank you notes and postcards from vacation destinations, as opposed to texts and Facebook posts. People under 50 may discover that the U.S. Post Office is a pretty good deal. Look at what can be legitimately sent through the mail!” The exhibition includes an education component designed to foster new connections between students at six Charleston-area schools: Memminger School of Global Studies, downtown Charleston; Northside Elementary School, Walterboro; C. E. Williams Middle School, suburban Charleston; Rollings Middle School of the Arts, Summerville; Lincoln Middle/High School, McClellanville; and Academic Magnet High School, North Charleston. Artist Bob Ray will be in residence from Jan. 22 through Feb. 11, working with students on correspondence art projects that combine elements of visual arts, English language arts, and social studies, according to Lori Kornegay, curator of art and public engagement. “Students will join Bob in the gallery to learn how he makes his art and how it fits into art history, and then our education coordinator, Maya McGauley, will visit each school to work with the students in class. We’re pairing the two elementary schools, the two middle schools and the two high schools. Students will research their community, school or family, select a topic to write about and create their own works of art that will then be mailed to students at their partner school. We expect that each student will create between two and five pieces of correspondence art, and we’ll encourage them to also mail their art to Bob Ray and to South Carolina legislators.” The project will culminate with an exhibition comprised of student-created correspondence art to be held at the Charleston County Public Library in May. Each teacher will be provided with a large self-addressed stamped envelope in which to mail all of the correspondence art they have received to the Halsey Institute. “We hope this project will be the beginning of a continuing relationship between these schools, which were chosen with geographic diversity in mind, and we hope to inspire the students to continue sending each other correspondence art,” said Kornegay. “It will no doubt spark amazing connections and create, at least for some, lifelong pen pals! For some students, it may be their first time on a college campus, so visiting (the Halsey) could be a step toward imagining that experience as a part of their future. We believe the program will also be an excellent opportunity to introduce students, their parents and the school’s administration and faculty to the excellent educational resources available to them here at the Halsey.” Correspondence Art: Words, Objects, and Images by Ray Johnson, Richard C., and Bob Ray opens Jan. 22 and runs through March 5. To find out more about the artists, the exhibition and related programs (including correspondence art projects for the public) visit the Halsey Institute’s website. This residency and exhibition are funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.

Celebrate the arts at the S.C. Arts Gala!

Mark May 13 on your calendar and reserve your tickets for the annual  South Carolina Arts Gala! The South Carolina Arts Foundation invites you to celebrate the South Carolina Arts Awards at the pre-gala recognition ceremony, which kicks off the evening at 6:15 p.m. at Southside Baptist Church, 702 Whaley St. in Columbia. The gala and an art sale — featuring  fabulous art and food — begin at 7:15 p.m. in the Grand Hall of 701 Whaley (701 Whaley St.). The awards ceremony honors the recipients of the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts and the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards. The art sale features original one-of-a-kind artworks by some of South Carolina’s finest contemporary artists, including functional and non-functional craft, paintings and sculpture. Seasoned and beginning collectors alike will find “must have” works and enjoy meeting artists. The South Carolina Arts Foundation designates gala proceeds to help support arts education, artist development and other programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission. Don’t miss the arts party of the year! Tickets are $75 each. Reserve your ticket(s) today!

S.C. Arts Commission building new relationships through Gullah Geechee partnership

Gullah Geechee mtg Conway May 2013 Launching the partnership in May 2013 In May 2013, the South Carolina Arts Commission entered a partnership with the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission to help increase awareness of and connect to the state's Gullah Geechee artists and communities. This partnership between a state arts agency and the Corridor Commission is the first of its kind in the four-state corridor, which includes North Carolina, Georgia and Florida. The Arts Commission's involvement as a partner is also providing a template for recognizing the culture regionally and nationally. (Download the Gullah Geechee Heritage Corridor brochure - PDF) Layla Love Young artist Layla Love at a Gullah Geechee community arts meeting at the Penn Center. Through this partnership, the Arts Commission has created an initiative to recognize the distinct artistic contributions of the Gullah Geechee  -- descendants of formerly enslaved people -- by identifying and supporting artists with professional development, networking opportunities and grants. The Arts Commission's work follows the Corridor Commission's management plan in recognizing the Gullah Geechee people's contributions to music, arts, handicrafts, foodways, spirituality, language, education and economic development. The initiative includes fostering the preservation of the Gullah Geechee traditions while recognizing the culture as the setting for contemporary Gullah Geechee artists and creatives -- a way of honoring both the historical and living expressions that have shaped the history of our state, region and country. (Related: S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May explains the importance of connecting to Gullah Geechee culture in this short video developed with SC-ETV's Palmetto Scene.) This initiative is part of the Arts Commission’s long-standing commitment to strategically design and build partnerships with other organizations and commissions in order to develop arts participation and community engagement. (Related: the last in a series of marketing workshops for Gullah Geechee artists is scheduled for Feb. 24 in Okatie, S.C. The workshop is free, but registration is required.) Images above article: Left to right: Cast net maker and Folk Heritage Award recipient Joseph Legree of St. Helena Island; Sweetgrass Basket Festival in Beaufort; Michael Smalls and Dino Badger of Bluffton were among Gullah Geechee artists featured at OneSouthCarolina 2014.

Exhibition showcases state’s best-known African-American artists

Take advantage of the opportunity to see works from the State Art Collection during the The African-American Voice exhibition, which runs through February 12, 2015, at the Hyman Fine Arts Center Gallery, located on Patriot Drive on the campus of Francis Marion University in Florence, S.C. The exhibition includes works by 25 African-American artists who are among the state’s best-known and most widely celebrated practitioners. The artists range from self-taught, outsider artists such as Richard Burnside, Leroy Marshall and Dan Robert Miller, to academically trained artists with established careers such as Leo Twiggs, Arthur Rose and Tarleton Blackwell. “A number of these artists are legendary as arts educators as well," said Harriett Green, visual arts director at the South Carolina Arts Commission."Their influences and contributions extend beyond image and object making." A preview of The African-American Voice artwork is available online. The exhibition is free to the public. The gallery is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. For more information, call (843) 661-1385. Organizations and businesses interested in hosting an exhibition or displaying works from the State Art Collection should contact Harriett Green at (803) 734-8696. In addition to The African American Voice, two other traveling exhibitions are available: Contemporary Conversations and Points of Departure: Vessel Forms from the State Art Collection. About the State Art Collection The State Art Collection is considered the most comprehensive public collection of works by contemporary South Carolina artists. Established in 1967 as one of the first programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission, the State Art Collection has grown to include 489 works in a variety of media and styles by 283 South Carolina contemporary artists. Small exhibitions featuring work from the collection are organized on a regular basis for rural and isolated areas inside and outside of the state. Works from the State Art Collection are available for loan to art museums, state agencies, and public and private organizations for the purpose of public exhibition or public display. The collection is supported in part by the South Carolina Arts Foundation and First Citizens Bank.

Two S.C. artists among winners of National Outdoor Sculpture Competition

Seventy-five sculpture artists from across the nation applied to the 9th Annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition and Exhibition organized by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department. Two of the 11 artists chosen for the exhibition are from South Carolina: Bob Doster of Lancaster and Kevin Eichner of Hilton Head. The exhibition was presented as a component of the 2014 North Charleston Arts Festival and is displayed at the North Charleston Riverfront Park through March 25, 2015. This unique, 11-month exhibition offers established and emerging artists the opportunity to display their thought provoking, extraordinary sculptures, as well as compete for up to $16,250 in honorariums and awards. "The natural beauty of Riverfront Park offers the ideal setting for each of these remarkable sculptures,” said juror Brad Thomas, director of residencies & exhibitions at the McColl Center in Charlotte, N.C. “I have long been a proponent of art outside the confines of museum and gallery walls. Sculpture in public spaces can serve to intrigue those who may be considered excluded from the world of art. By virtue of its placement, art in public spaces serves as ambassador, possessing the potential to break down perceived barriers of exclusivity and unlock a lifetime of creative thought and inquiry.” The 11 sculptures selected for exhibition are by 11 artists from seven states. Congratulations to the winners of the 2014/15 National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition:

  • An Ode to Architectural Form (painted steel) by Jordan Krutsch - Greenville, N.C (Best in Show)
  • Duet (reclaimed steel) by Kevin Eichner - Hilton Head Island, S.C (Outstanding Merit)
  • Cloud Rain (steel) by Jeffie Brewer – Nacogdoches, Texas (Honorable Mention)
  • Slice of Heaven (concrete & limestone) by Craig Gray - Key West, Fla. (Honorable Mention)
  • Summit (granite, glass, stainless steel) by Antoinette Priene Schultze - Eliot, Maine (Honorable Mention)
  • PC Column (powder coated steel) by Carl Billingsley - Ayden, N.C.
  • Dancer (stainless steel) by Bob Doster - Lancaster, S.C
  • Tumbling Towards the Sun (steel) by Gary Gresko - Oriental, N.C.
  • Growth & Direction (forged & fabricated steel/perforated steel) by Corrina Sephora Mensoff - Atlanta, Ga.
  • Foreversphere (polyethylene) by Matthew Newman - Damascus, Va.
  • The Dance (cor-ten steel) by Davis Whitfield, IV - Sylva, N.C.
View photographs of the 11 works online at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com. Sculpture sites are located throughout North Charleston Riverfront Park, located at 1001 Everglades Avenue on the former Charleston Naval Base. The park is set on the banks of the Cooper River. In addition to the sculptures, visitors may enjoy 10 acres of walking paths, a performance pavilion, picnic shelter, a fishing pier and boardwalk, an oversized sandbox, and children’s play fountain. The park is open daily during daylight hours. Admission and parking are free. For more information call the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843-740-5854 or email culturalarts@northcharleston.org. Via: North Charleston Cultural Arts Department

S.C. artists among prize winners at ArtFields

Congratulations to the three South Carolina artists who won prizes during ArtFields, held April 25- May 4 in Lake City:

More from the Florence Morning News:
Two is better than one, right? ArtFields judges threw a curve ball Saturday night when they announced they were awarding two juried prizes instead of the planned one. The two juried prizes, with each winner receiving $25,000, went to John Eric Riis of Atlanta, for his diptych “Neoclassic Male and Female Tapestry,” and Charleston’s Robert Snead for his cardboard “Family Dollar General Tree.” The additional awarded funds will be sponsored by the Lake City Partnership Council, the organization responsible for putting on ArtFields. Top prize and $50,000 went to Craig Colorusso of Rogers, Arkansas, for his “Sun Boxes Mach II,” which was on display at the Pole Barn behind the Bean Market. Two South Carolinians won the people’s choice award. Charleston’s Colin Quashie and Cheraw’s Joshua Refearn were both on hand to accept their awards. They each received $12,500 checks for their works: Quashie for the two-dimensional “Out of Bondage I,” and Redfearn for his three-dimensional piece, “Think.”

African-American Voice exhibition travels to Lake City

Folks in the Pee Dee area can view works by African-American artists who are among the state’s best-known and most widely celebrated practitioners during The African-American Voice exhibition in Lake City. Presented by the Jones-Carter Gallery, the exhibition kicks off Jan. 31 and runs through March 22. The public is invited to the opening reception Jan. 31 from 6 - 9 p.m. Coordinated by Harriett Green, visual arts director at the South Carolina Arts Commission, the exhibition includes 40 pieces of artwork in all media from the State Art Collection. The pieces are by 25 African-American artists who range from self-taught, outsider artists such as Richard Burnside, Leroy Marshall and Dan Robert Miller, to academically trained artists with established careers such as Leo Twiggs, Arthur Rose and Tarleton Blackwell. “A number of these artists are legendary as arts educators as well. Their influences and contributions extend beyond image and object making,” said Green, who sees the show as an opportunity for area residents to learn more about the contribution of African-American artists in South Carolina. A preview of The African-American Voice artwork is available online. The exhibition is free to the public. The gallery, located at 105 Henry St. in Lake City, is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. until 6 p.m. and Saturday 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. For more information, contact the Jones-Carter Gallery, (843) 374-1505. Organizations and businesses interested in hosting an exhibition or displaying works from the State Art Collection should contact Harriett Green at (803) 734-8696. In addition to The African American Voice, two other traveling exhibitions are available: Contemporary Conversations and Points of Departure: Vessel Forms from the State Art Collection. About the State Art Collection The State Art Collection is considered the most comprehensive public collection of works by contemporary South Carolina artists. Established in 1967 as one of the first programs of the South Carolina Arts Commission, the State Art Collection has grown to include 448 works in a variety of media and styles by 277 South Carolina contemporary artists. Small exhibitions featuring work from the collection are organized on a regular basis for rural and isolated areas inside and outside of the state. Works from the State Art Collection are available for loan to art museums, state agencies, and public and private organizations for the purpose of public exhibition or public display. The collection is supported in part by the South Carolina Arts Foundation and Kahn Development Company. (Images are of works in the exhibition. Click on each image for more information.)