← View All Articles

Jason Rapp

Friday feel-good post: ‘Together While Apart’

Seabrook Island artist spans coasts with project


Deane Bowers set out to spread a positive message to fight prevailing "negativity, divisiveness, loss, and pessimism" running rampant with what she does best: making art.

[caption id="attachment_46949" align="alignright" width="150"]Deane Bowers, dressed in a white top with green scarf, holds a piece of art resembling the U.S. flag. Deane Bowers (provided photo)[/caption] The Seabrook Island artist (right) says it best: "I decided I needed to find a way to bring people together, even if it was only a small one. I thought that if I could gather people, even people physically separated, to work towards something bigger than ourselves, that collectively we might find joy, fellowship and fun-and we could make a difference. I wanted to be a part of the solution, to offer something positive to a hurting world." So Bowers put out an open call for art on social media and used some personal contacts. Artists of diverse backgrounds and locations, 19 in all from eight states, were culled to lend their talents to a collective large piece. Thus, Together While Apart was born, a group of artists coming together amidst pandemic conditions with the collective wish to combat isolation, loneliness, and unhappiness during an unsettled time. Health worries, economic insecurity, racial strife—we're all aware.

The creative process

Much of Bowers' art comes from repurposed items, and the only art supplies she had in abundance at the time were recycled shipping boxes: a certain sign of the times and familiar refrain from most of us in the early days of lockdowns and restrictions. "I sent each artist several 6” x 6” square pieces of cut cardboard from these recycled boxes with one simple instruction: think outside of the box! My goal was that through the creative process, each artist would find an outlet for his or her feelings and eventually these emotions would transform into joy. Ultimately, our collective joys would be multiplied and shared with many others through our artwork," she said. "As the weeks passed, and I started receiving the squares back, I was repeatedly amazed by the imagination, talent and effort that each artist put forth in their cardboard. The result was so much more than I could ever imagine. The creative energy of the group was palpable, and our pieces seem to flow together with beautiful synergy. It was my honor to be the artist who pieced the squares together ... What started as discarded cardboard boxes stacked in my garage, ended as an incredible artistic collage of many beautiful souls who poured themselves into their work..."

BONUS CONTENT: Bowers in her own words on the project, with pieces and their artists identified (YouTube)

The artists

  • Deane Bowers (Seabrook Island, South Carolina)
  • Liz Brent (Chicago)
  • Sandy Buffie (Washington)
  • Nikki Contini (San Rafael, California)
  • Will Cooke with Jennifer Mildonian and Marcelle VanYahres (Charlottesville, Virginia)
  • Lynette Driver (Brevard, North Carolina)
  • Celie Gehring (Richmond, Virginia)
  • Lynn Karegeannes (Asheville, North Carolina)
  • Cathy Kleiman (Charleston)
  • Dayo Johnson (Nashville)
  • Amy Lauria (Painesville, Ohio)
  • Rachel McLaughlin (Charlottesville, Virginia)
  • Debbie Pompano (Hanover, Virginia)
  • Rebecca Potts (Los Angeles)
  • Frankie Slaughter (Richmond, Virginia)
  • Jim Weaver (Florence, Alabama)
  • Cindy Webb (Statesville, North Carolina)

Where is it now?

"The biggest thrill is that Together While Apart is featured on the Smithsonian's "Stories of 2020" online exhibit," Bowers said. The finished work is scheduled to be reviewed by the art review boards at both Cedars- Sinai Hospital in L.A. and McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina. A large hospital in Richmond, Virginia is requesting to display it "for however long they can have it" and the Hickory Museum of Art has offered a six-month exhibit. And then? Bowers intends to gift to a non-profit or medical facility whose mission resonates with the group. They hope it inspires feelings of the love, warmth, and optimism that went into its creation. [caption id="attachment_46947" align="aligncenter" width="599"] Together While Apart (2020). Click image to enlarge.[/caption]

Jason Rapp

Spartanburg artist explores mental illness, including his own

‘It’s okay to say mental illness.’


Spartanburg artist Bailie will debut his latest body of work—In The Midst of a Trauma, an extensive collection that probes the minds of people with mental illnesses—May 4-29 at Artists Collective | Spartanburg.

[caption id="attachment_46918" align="alignright" width="225"] Bailie | Bipolar disorder. Click image to enlarge.[/caption] “After suffering through a mental block and finding help through therapy, I’ve spent the past two years working on this exhibit,” the one-name artist said. “I’m telling everyone that ‘It’s okay to say mental illness.’ That phrase or slogan is my mantra, and I want to bring mental illness out of the dark and explore it in a way that people can come to understand that we all have problems, that we all need a little help from time to time, that we can do better and even thrive.” This multifaceted exhibition includes photography, paintings, multimedia sculptures, video, and creations that defy definition. To create much of this exhibition, Bailie worked with his therapist to interview five people diagnosed with various mental health problems, such as split personalities and manic depression. From those interviews he created six encaustic wax photographs (including one of himself) that depict the person’s mental health. Also, he asked each person to describe his or her worst state of mental health, and from those descriptions, he made six sculptures, including one about his own state of mind. When the photography and sculptures are exhibited, they will be accompanied by the actual questions and answers. All but one person will use his or her real name. “It takes true bravery to put your mental health problems on display for the world to see,” Bailie said. “However, speaking from experience, it is also freeing. It’s like telling the world you are not ashamed. In most cases, people with cancer are not ashamed. Or people with diabetes. Or people with COVID-19. Mental health problems are really no different than physical health problems. If you have a problem, get help, and live your life!” In addition, Bailie will display Scribble Man, a sculpture of a man’s upper body made of wire; a video of an animated white figure crab-walking backward as the body is torn apart and blown away; and a plexiglass box full of pill bottles that represent the many type of mental illnesses and the drugs used to treat them. [caption id="attachment_46911" align="alignright" width="225"] Bailie | Encaustic portrait | 10x10. Click image to enlarge.[/caption] To give people insight into his own state of mental health, Bailie has painted several large canvases that depict times in his life that he either struggled with mental illness, looked for answers, and accepted the cards that life had dealt him. In what is probably the most telling creation, Bailie has painted a profile self-portrait that shows him in deep contemplation, emerging from darkness into light. “That painting has more story behind it than what the average patron might get to know,” Bailie said. “Originally, the painting was done about 10 years ago, right after my parents died within two weeks of each other. To say the least, that was a hard time for me. I painted a dark picture with an anguished and agonized face in the center. It was pretty disturbing. To make it even more personal, I had mixed some of my parents’ cremation ashes into the paints that I used. “After going through therapy and discovering some repressed memories about my family, I had to express myself in the most profound way I could,” Bailie continued. “So, I painted over that picture with my self-portrait, a picture that shows me finally coming to grips with why I felt so angry, so hurt, so damaged. Behind my exterior, there are some dark things. But I recognize them. I deal with them. I am passed them. I’m okay.” Establishing professional credibility for this exhibit, Bailie has received both moral and financial support, including that of Mental Health America of Spartanburg, The Carolina Center for Behavioral Health, the Phifer-Johnson Foundation (a family foundation based in Spartanburg that gives primarily to the arts, education, health and human services), and various unnamed individuals.
In the Midst of a Trauma will open for public viewing Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. beginning May 4. Free. A free and public reception will be held Thursday, May 20, 6-9 p.m., during Spartanburg’s monthly ArtWalk, now returning to its regular third Thursday schedule.

Jason Rapp

‘Springing into the Arts’ in Lancaster

With mural debut, fun events


Lancaster County Council of the Arts is partnering with Lindsay Pettus Greenway and the City of Lancaster for "Spring into the Arts" celebrating public art with the reveal of the greenway's first mural as the event centerpiece.

The Saturday, April 24th event will feature art by children from each of the Lancaster County schools in a Youth Art Month outdoor exhibition on the greenway, an inclusive participatory project titled "Be the Art" for everyone who wishes to participate, a drone video project, live music and a poetry reading, a morning run, a rain barrel workshop, a bird count, arts and crafts for kids, food trucks, and the mural unveiling with an artist talk—all designed to bring attention to and support for Lancaster County Council of the Arts and the Lindsay Pettus Greenway's commitment to public art in the environment. [caption id="attachment_43762" align="alignright" width="150"] Amiri Farris[/caption] Artist Amiri Farris designed the Woodland Drive underpass mural, and it will be painted under his direction by teams composed mostly of UofSC Lancaster students and other interested participants. The mural will reflect the environmental mission and beauty of the Greenway. Teams will paint throughout the week beginning on April 19 and ending with an unveiling and artist’s talk by Farris on Saturday, April 24 at noon. Anyone interested in viewing the work in progress is welcome to visit the Woodland Drive underpass during Greenway open hours from dawn to dusk and at the unveiling on Saturday April 24 at noon. "Be the Art" is an interactive “Spring into the Arts” exhibition in which anyone can participate. At 11 a.m., beginning at the Founders Federal access at Barr Street School, participants will carry umbrellas on the short, 7/10 of a mile walk from Barr Street to the Woodland Drive underpass. Anyone who wishes to "Be the Art" will walk single file, wearing masks and socially distanced, along the greenway with umbrellas open while a drone films the moving line of umbrellas. Borrowing from the New Orleans umbrella tradition, this is an interactive and visually bold art piece that highlights inclusivity, movement, color, and the beautiful setting of the greenway. The drone video of this project will be used to highlight the Lancaster County Council of the Arts and the Lindsay Pettus Greenway in various media and on the LCCA’s YouTube channel. Umbrellas will be given away to the first 250 people who wish to participate. “Youth Art Month,” normally displayed at the Historic Springs House Galleries, features art by Lancaster County School District K-12 students. This year the exhibit will be a one-day event on the greenway. The exhibit will open at 10 a.m. and remain on view until 2 p.m. and take place in various greenway locations between Founders Federal access at Barr Street and Constitution Park (at the intersection of Woodland Drive and Main Street). Spring into the Arts events to celebrate the mural unveiling are as follows:
  • Katawba Valley Land Trust bird count and walk (8 a.m., Nature Pavilion, Comporium access on Colonial Drive)
  • Lancaster Runs (9 a.m., Nature Pavilion, Comporium access on Colonial Drive)
  • Keep Lancaster Beautiful litter pick up (9:30 a.m., Founders Federal access at Barr Street)
  • Nature Crafts for Kids (1-3 p.m., Pier Overlook near Comporium access on Colonial Drive)
  • Catawba Riverkeepers Foundation Rain Barrel Workshop (1-3 p.m., Nature Pavilion at the Comporium access on Colonial Drive. Please sign up at https://catawbariverkeeper.dm.networkforgood.com/forms/april-24-lpg-rain-barrel-workshop)
  • Lancaster County Council of the Arts Lemonade Stand (12-1 p.m., Woodland Drive Underpass)
  • Poetry Reading by Lisa Hammond, USC Lancaster faculty and guest poet (Noon, Woodland Drive Underpass)
  • Artist Talk by Amiri Farris, guest muralist (Noon, Woodland Drive Underpass)
  • Music on the Greenway with guest musician Bo Beaumont (11 a.m. until noon at the Almetta Street access; 1-2 pm. at Constitution Park)
Parking for “Spring into the Arts” April 24 events is available at the Founders Federal access at Barr Street, Lancaster High School Stadium, Parking Lot at 800 North White St. (former Arras Foundation building), and First Presbyterian Church at 700 North Main St. All events are free and open to the public. Donations to the Lancaster County Council of the Arts and the Lindsay Pettus Greenway are encouraged and welcome by both organizations. Food Trucks Kona Ice and Wilber’s Last Ride will have food available for purchase from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the Lancaster High School Stadium lot.

Jason Rapp

S.C. Arts Awards to stream live again in 2021

Virtual presentation planned for May 24


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE COLUMBIA, S.C. – The South Carolina Arts Awards will honor South Carolinians for their exceptional achievements in, support of, or advocacy for the arts during a professionally produced online streaming presentation planned for Monday, May 24, 2020 at 6 p.m. The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) and partner McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina look forward to honoring the seven recipients of the South Carolina Governor’s Awards for the Arts and two recipients of the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards in a special online presentation on SouthCarolinaArts.com. Lead host and SCAC Executive Director David Platts will be joined again by South Carolina First Lady Peggy McMaster as co-host from the Governor’s Mansion. UofSC McKissick Museum Executive Director Jane Przybysz will join Platts and McMaster to announce the Folk Heritage Award recipients. Platts will announce the Governor’s Award recipients. Before the pandemic, the South Carolina Arts Awards were presented at an in-person ceremony. Rather than cancel in 2020, the ceremony was shifted to a virtual format that was successful for its extended reach and production quality. After overwhelmingly positive feedback—and with lingering COVID-19 transmission concerns—the ceremony will again be presented online, at no cost to viewers anywhere. Surprise guests will join to help introduce each recipient. Mini-films by South Carolina filmmakers Drew Baron, Lynn Cornfoot, Abe Duenas, Patrick Hayes, Roni Henderson, Lee Ann Kornegay, and Ebony Wilson will debut, telling each recipient’s story. The filmmakers worked under the direction of producer Betsy Newman. Location shooting for the ceremony and production of the stream are being provided by Midlands-based iSite Multimedia and Fisher Films. The Governor’s Award recipients were announced in February. The recipients are:
  • Tom Flowers (posthumous, Greenville): Lifetime Achievement Award
  • Charlton Singleton (Charleston): Artist Category
  • Jennifer Clark Evins (Spartanburg): Individual Category
  • Tayloe Harding (Columbia): Arts in Education Category
  • Colonial Life (Columbia): Business/Foundation Category
  • ColaJazz Foundation (Columbia): Organization Category
  • Marjory Wentworth (Mount Pleasant): Special Award
The Folk Heritage Award recipients were also announced in February. Being honored are:
  • Jugnu Verma (Lexington): Traditional Indian folk arts
  • Robert W. Hill, III (Plantersville): Advocacy, American long rifles and accoutrements

 About the South Carolina Arts Commission The mission of the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina. We envision a South Carolina where the arts are valued and all people benefit from a variety of creative experiences. A state agency created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas: arts education, community arts development, and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the SCAC is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. Visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696, and follow @scartscomm on social media. About McKissick Museum The University of South Carolina’s McKissick Museum tells the story of southern life: community, culture, and the environment. The Museum, located on the University of South Carolina’s historic Horseshoe, has more than 140,000 objects in its collection, including one of the most extensive natural science collections in the Southeast. For visitation information, online exhibits, and more, please visit sc.edu/mckissickmuseum.

Jason Rapp

The latest from #SCartists

Established, emerging artists featured


Painter Brian Rutenberg is no stranger to those familiar with the State Art Collection, which houses a 1997 work of his. The College of Charleston alum and current New Yorker opens a new show Friday, April 30 at the Jerald Melburg Gallery in Charlotte, running until June 12. [caption id="attachment_46849" align="aligncenter" width="576"] Brian Rutenberg | Point of Pine | 2021 | 48 x 72 in. |
Oil on linen[/caption]
Among the inaugural class of Emerging Artist Grant recipients from the SCAC is dancer Ashlea Sovetts. She and collaborator Alexandria Nunweiler are presenting a workshop on the creative process at the World Dance Alliance Americas 2021 Virtual Conference & Festival Assembly at the end of the month:

Submitted material

Annual North Charleston Arts Fest set for April 28-May 2

Annual festival returns with in person, virtual programming


The annual North Charleston Arts Fest is just weeks away, set to take place April 28-May 2.

The celebration of arts and culture returns for its 38th year after being cancelled in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Highlighting the talents of regional and local artists and performers in the areas of dance, music, theatre, visual arts, and literature, the event features performances, activities, and exhibits presented in a variety of venues throughout the city of North Charleston. Recognized by the Southeast Tourism Society as a Top 20 Event in both 2008 and 2018, the North Charleston Arts Fest includes concerts ranging from classical to contemporary, theatre presentations, dance performances, children’s programs, workshops, demonstrations, exhibitions, and more. With budget and health concerns lingering as a result of the pandemic, this year’s programming won’t appear as robust as in years past (events such as the World Art Expo at Riverfront Park and Children’s Festival will not take place in 2021), but the City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department staff has worked hard to make this year’s North Charleston Arts Fest both entertaining and safe. All patrons are reminded to wear a face covering and practice social distancing when attending events and exhibitions in person, and virtual programming was added to this year’s festival schedule. The majority of festival events are free. Complete details about the five-day event are available at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com.

Visual Arts

Exhibit Hall A at the Charleston Area Convention Center will once again host the Arts Fest’s Judged Art & Photography, South Carolina Palmetto Hands Fine Craft, and Tri-County Youth Art & High School Sculpture exhibitions during the entire run of the Arts Fest. Viewing hours are Wednesday, April 28, 6-8 p.m. (opening celebration); Thursday-Saturday, April 29-May 1, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and finally the Exhibition Encore on Sunday, May 2, from noon-5 p.m. serves as a closing reception and celebration, allowing patrons to view the artwork in a festive atmosphere and make final decisions on purchases. In addition to the vast array of artwork on display, the event offers musical entertainment, live art demonstrations, and complimentary “bites and bubbles” from 2-5 p.m. Other visual art highlights include "Loose Parts," a solo exhibit at Park Circle Gallery featuring new paintings by the Arts Fest’s poster design competition winner Christine Bush Roman, the 15th Annual National Outdoor Sculpture Exhibition installed at North Charleston Riverfront Park, and the 14th Annual African American Fiber Art Exhibition: SANKOFA on display at North Charleston City Hall. Each of these exhibitions will remain on view well after the festival concludes on May 2.

Theatre, Music, and Dance

Theatre, music, and dance offerings during this year’s Arts Fest run the gamut. Concerts range from bossa nova and bluegrass, to opera and Motown, and take place in a variety of venues, from wine bars and pubs to chapels and parks. A special Dance Showcase on the grounds of the Felix Davis Community Center will be held from 2-5 p.m. on Saturday, May 1. Much like the popular dance stage at the Arts Fest’s World Art Expo, the event highlights traditional, folk, and modern dances of cultures from around the world by local performers in vibrant costumes. Lady in White Productions will offer a three-night run of "Real Woman Blues" from Friday, April 30, through Sunday, May 2. The original play, written and directed by local artist Samelia Adams, takes audiences on a sisterhood journey and explores the many facets of being a woman and the ups and downs that come with life, such as love, family, broken relationships, friendships, domestic violence, self-esteem, and self-worth. The production also features new music written by the band Season, under the direction of Duane Branch. Several children’s programs will be offered virtually through a partnership with Charleston County Public Library. And, of course, the performing and visual arts come together at the Arts Fest Arty Block Party on Friday, April 30, from 5-8:30 p.m. on East Montague Avenue. The socially distanced street market features vendor booths with local artists, makers, and arts-related businesses and organizations, live music by The Louie D. Project and Amani Smith & the Give Thanks Band, along with roving entertainers.
Complete information on all 2021 North Charleston Arts Fest offerings and participation opportunities is available at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com. Applications are currently being accepted for vendor space at the Arty Block Party. Entry instructions for the Festival’s Judged Fine Art Exhibition, Judged Photography Exhibition, Tri-County Youth Art Exhibition, and Tri-County High School Sculpture Exhibition, as well as volunteer sign-up forms are also available. Forms can be downloaded at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply.

Submitted material

Uncommon threads coming to Park Circle Gallery

A Thread Runs Through It opens April 2


The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that works by Art Quilters of the Lowcountry will be on display at Park Circle Gallery from April 2-24, 2021. The group exhibition is free and open to the public.

The Art Quilters of the Lowcountry is a group of five award-winning fiber artists who share a passion for creating art using fabric and thread. Their work ranges from large to small and from abstract to realistic, using fabric, thread, and quilting techniques to create the illusion of 3-dimensional art. This group of artists exhibits monthly at the Hilton Head Island Art League at Ats Center at Shelter Cove on Hilton Head Island. The artists have been selected individually for many juried quilt and art shows. "A Thread Runs Through It" features fiber pieces that showcase the individual interests and talents of the Art Quilters of the Lowcountry. Ron Hodge creates his art using various fabrics, but there is always one constant – his precision piecing and bead work. Donna Stankiewicz paints her fabric with various dyes and then embellishes with applique and thread painting. Ro Morrissey uses strips of fabric along with thread painting to create painterly images of seascapes and landscapes. Peg Weschke creates fiber collages to realistically portray Lowcountry scenes, and Jody Wigton uses color and improvisational piecing to create beautiful abstract art. The artists’ five unique styles together create an interesting and eclectic fiber art show. To learn more about the Quilters, visit their website at www.artquiltersofthelowcountry.com.
The Park Circle Gallery is located at 4820 Jenkins Avenue in North Charleston, in what was formerly known as the Olde Village Community Building. Admission is free and free street parking is available on Jenkins Avenue in front of the gallery, as well as on the adjacent streets and in parking lots close by. The gallery is open 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, and Noon-4 p.m. on Saturdays. In compliance with safety recommendations from the CDC and SCDHEC, gallery capacity is currently limited to 10 people at a time. Staff and all visitors must wear a mask while they are in the gallery and practice social distancing. Hand sanitizer will be provided upon entry. For more information about PCG, call 843.637.3565 or email culturalarts@northcharleston.org. For information on other Cultural Arts programs and artist opportunities, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website at www.northcharleston.org.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: Poetry, poet news + Artista Vista news

Good morning! 

"Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...

Here's some poetry stuff...

  • Don't miss out. Applications to be South Carolina's next poet laureate are CLOSING FRIDAY. (Here's where you can learn more.)
  • Nine Cloud Journal is publishing Clarence Carter Boucher's poem, "I AM Tempered Steel." The poem is about overcoming abuse.
And some arts events news to put some wind in our sails. Artista Vista is coming back to the Congaree Vista in April. "Bigger, more inclusive ... health and public safety a priority..." The Congaree Vista is a South Carolina Cultural District. There's probably one near you, so see what's going on there and support those local artists, artisans, and merchants and restaurateurs in.      

Jason Rapp

Record-setting virtual art piece sells for $69 million

And it's from an #SCartists

[caption id="attachment_46605" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Everydays: The First 5,000 Days (2021) |
Beeple | Digital | 2021[/caption]

Not familiar with the name Beeple? You need to be.

Mike Winkelmann is a Charleston artist most commonly referred to as @beeple, his nomme de net.  According to a piece in India's Economic Times, six months ago the 39-year-old had never sold a work. Today he became wealthy and world famous. Screenshot of tweet from ARTnews that says Christie's sold the Beeple digital work for "a staggering $69.3 million at auction this morning" and shows a portion of the work. Ten days ago, Christie's Auction House started the bidding for Everydays: The First 5,000 Days at the meager sum of $100 and did not even estimate a value. Recent fascination in the cryptocurrency market exploded into the crypto art market and drove the price to $4 million six days ago, $14.75 million just this morning (ed. note: not a typo), and in the final moments from $37.5 million to $50 million before the smoke cleared on an unheard of, staggering, mind-blowing, near-incomprehensible $69.3 million price. [caption id="attachment_46607" align="aligncenter" width="450"] We're NOT linking to that.[/caption] From ARTnews:

At the end of February following Christie’s launch of the sale, another work by Beeple sold for $6.6 million through Nifty Gateway, an online cryptocurrency marketplace for digital art, at the time a price record for a Beeple piece and then the most expensive digital work ever auctioned.

Beeple has amassed a cult following in the crypto art market. In December, one of his digital works made $3.5 million in the artist’s second appearance on the market. Within the first few minutes of opening, the auction at Nifty Gateway broke records for digital art sales. Many of the works were resold at inflated values—some at more than 1,000 percent of their original purchase price.

Read more about this jaw-dropping breaking story from these sources: You can also follow @beeple on Twitter. (NSFW language warning)

Submitted material

New Gullah Art Gallery opens in Beaufort

City welcomes only solo Black female Gullah art gallery

The ribbon's been cut at Legacy Art Gallery, LLC in Beaufort.

Owner and artist Lisa Rivers is on location painting and creating beautiful artwork. On this International Women's Day, The Hub notes that hers is the only solo Black female Gullah art gallery in Beaufort. Rivers says each piece is full of love and vivid colors. Find Legacy Art Gallery in Old Bay Marketplace, 917 Bay St., Suite C.