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Tuning Up: Unique new exhibition + financial management training

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


A thin blue line ... on canvas? Columbia Police Department employees are showing off their artistic talents in a new exhibition at the Columbia City Hall Art Gallery (from Cola Daily). Work from 15 employees is on display Monday through Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 1737 Main St. in Columbia through Sept. 26. Free. ICYMI: A Stronger Bottom Line. The S.C. Arts Alliance – with funding help provided by the SCAC and the Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation – is announcing a new training program to help organizations and their leadership teams become even stronger in financial management. It is open to all SCAC organizational grantees with budgets between $200,000-$750,000. This program will provide participating organizations with tailored assistance to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of financial operations. And while it's valued at $3,500 per organization, thanks to the funding assistance mentioned above it is available for just $200. (Not a typo; we checked. - Ed.) All training takes place in Charleston. It is an exceptional resource for those who need it, and many do. Find out more now!
Arts funding clarification. You might have noticed that on Friday The Hub and SCAC social media outlets ran posts thanking Gov. McMaster and the S.C. General Assembly for the former not issuing vetoes to the latter's increased funding for SCAC grants and arts education initiatives. It was a welcome and energizing, if not pleasantly surprising, break from the norm. You might also have noticed the governor did issue a veto to $500,000 "for" the SCAC that was actually for the S.C. Children's Theatre in Greenville. So how do we reconcile saying we're grateful to have been spared by the veto pen while that $500,000 was vetoed? Because the money in question, which originated in the House, was requested by a legislator on behalf of the theatre. Our agency was simply to be what's known as a "pass-through." House rules allow for legislators to request funds on behalf of private entities. If included in the budget and approved by the Senate and governor, the funds must be sent through a relevant state agency which did not request the funding before being disbursed to the recipient.

Governor affirms SCAC budget

Late this morning, Gov. McMaster signed off on the General Assembly's FY19 state budget with arts funding requested by the S.C. Arts Commission completely intact – which includes a $350,000 increase from the House and a $100,000 increase from the Senate. We're grateful for BIPARTISAN support for the arts from the legislative and executive branches. THANK YOU to the state leadership for affirming what we live and breathe every day: the arts benefit everyone, and everyone should have access to them. It's a great day for the arts in South Carolina!

Tuning Up: A two-act play about arts funding and bookkeeping

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


ACT ONE: Arts Funding Update

NEWSREADER (downstage, alone, follow spot only - no stage/house lighting) (serious)

We're getting late word of an arts funding update. (Beat. Touches earpiece as if listening to producer). YES! Yesterday, the South Carolina General Assembly passed a state budget on recommendation from the conference committee. The House voted 84-28 in favor, and the Senate 30-9. The adopted budget includes an additional $350,000 the House included in March and $100,000 the Senate added for arts education. The budget has gone to Governor McMaster to sign, veto, or use his line-item veto power to strike portions he doesn't like.

AUDIENCE, off-stage (gasps)

But his vetoes!

NEWSREADER (reassuring)

Arts leaders are cautiously optimistic that the funding will remain as passed. A decision by the governor is expected next week. He has five business days, excluding Sunday and the July Fourth holiday to respond. (Follow spot fades. Newsreader exits. A spontaneous candlelight vigil begins in audience.)

(Intermission)

ACT TWO: ICYMI: A Stronger Bottom Line.

GP MCLEER (in toga, enthusiastically - a soliloquy)

OYEZ! OYEZ! The S.C. Arts Alliance – with funding help provided by the SCAC and the Gaylord & Dorothy Donnelley Foundation – is announcing a new training program to help organizations and their leadership teams become even stronger in financial management. It is open to all SCAC organizational grantees with budgets between $200,000-$750,000. This program will provide participating organizations with tailored assistance to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of financial operations. And while it's valued at $3,500 per organization, thanks to the funding assistance mentioned above it is available (lean in, with emphasis) for just $200. All training takes place in Charleston. It is an exceptional resource for those who need it, and many do. Find out more now!

Tuning Up: Arts funding update + Google grants opportunity for Midlands

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Increases possible for federal, state arts funding. No, really. Yesterday in Washington, a Senate committee concurred with the House that the NEA should be funded at $155 million for FY19. That's a $2 million increase from FY18. The Senate Appropriations Committee should vote on the measure Thursday. Across the street from us at the State House, a conference committee is to reconvene next week to reconcile differences between House and Senate budget versions. Both bodies already approved a $350,000 funding increase for the S.C. Arts Commission, but an additional $100,000 in Education Improvement Act funds recommended by the Senate will need conference committee approval to progress to Gov. McMaster's desk. Midlands arts nonprofits: want a $50,000 grant? Four nonprofits from Calhoun, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lexington, Orangeburg, Richland, Saluda and Sumter counties will receive $50,000 in grant funding and training from Google thanks to Google Impact Challenge Columbia. All nonprofits are invited to submit proposals for their creative and innovative ideas to grow economic opportunity in their communities. A local panel will select four winners, and then the public votes on which of those will receive an additional $50,000. The SCAC can't urge you strongly enough to make a run at getting one of these. Be one of the... top dogs! The deadline is July 11. See a story from WIS here. Best of luck!

Tuning Up: Writing workshops for girls + 1858 Prize + Twitter

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Writing workshops for girls.  Big opportunity here for high school girls (grades 9-12) who are serious about honing their sci-fi and fantasy and/or poetry-writing skills: Columbia College is to offer two workshops June 18-22 on its campus, one on each topic. We don't cross-post much, but take a quick peek at Arts Daily for more information. The poetry workshop will be taught by Dr. Ray McManus, who pitched in as one of the judges for the Poetry Out Loud state finals this past March. Good enough for government work. It's not mentioned in the story, but just so you know, an additional $100,000 appropriated to the S.C. Arts Commission's budget by the Senate is among the differences to be reconciled by a General Assembly conference committee next month. While the budget was not sent to Gov. McMaster by the legislators' self-imposed deadline, this story claims a government shutdown is unlikely. The Hub and SCAC, along with other dedicated state employees, are grateful. Follow us. Do you follow us on Twitter? We'd hate to think you'd miss such social media goodness as this (right). Social media, for all its ills, is also one incredible tool. We're hoping to improve our Twitter presence, while (clearly) not taking ourselves too seriously. Last call for 1858! Applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art awarded by our friends at the Gibbes Museum will be accepted through May 31! The 1858 Prize awards $10,000 to an artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Learn more here.

Tuning Up: $350,000 on its way out

Good morning! "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


"Tuning Up" is getting in on our advocacy push this week as we lead up to S.C. Arts Advocacy Week and the State House rally and luncheon with legislators, presented by the S.C. Arts Alliance. Today's advocacy story hits right in the wallet - in a good way. See this? Successful S.C. House and Senate veto override votes allowed Arts Commission staff to begin processing $350,000 in additional funds to operating support grantees - and you're looking at them. The arts work being done as a result of arts funding - public support of the arts - from the mountains to the coast is phenomenal. Keep telling your stories, and keep helping our state move forward together.  

Senate joins House to override SCAC funding veto

This afternoon, the S.C. Senate voted to override a veto of funding to the SCAC, the S.C. House having voted to override the week before last. This restores $350,000 in funding to artists and arts agencies across the state. Our agency has a lengthy record of bipartisan support from the General Assembly, and we are grateful they recognize that our daily work benefits every South Carolinian. This funding is your funding, granted across the state so all can enjoy access to the benefits of the arts in their lives and communities, regardless of their location or circumstances. UPDATE, 17 Jan. 2018 | 10:02 a.m.: Read more about the what the overrides mean from the South Carolina Arts Alliance.

White House proposes to eliminate National Endowment for the Arts

This morning, the White House released its executive budget proposal, which calls for the elimination of all funding for the National Endowment for the Arts, as well as the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. This is the very beginning of the budget process. It’s important to note that the President does not set the federal budget, Congress does. An executive budget proposal is exactly just that, a proposal. But at the same time, the Administration’s proposal can be influential to members of Congress. The South Carolina Arts Alliance has published several talking points and action steps for arts advocates.

Arts Commission executive director elected to national grantmakers board

Ken MaySouth Carolina Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May has been elected to the Grantmakers in the Arts board of directors. He will serve a three-year term beginning January 2017. Grantmakers in the Arts (GIA) is the only national association of both public and private arts and culture funders in the U.S., including independent and family foundations, public agencies, community foundations, corporate philanthropies, nonprofit regrantors, and national service organizations – funders of all shapes and sizes across the U.S. and into Canada. GIA provides leadership and service that advances the use of philanthropic and governmental resources to support the growth of the arts and culture. With offices in Seattle, GIA sponsors an annual conference; research and publications on arts philanthropy, including The Reader periodical; and a robust website with a library of studies and articles. The organization hosts regional and local workshops on issues such as capitalization of the nonprofit arts sector, artists working in community settings, arts and medicine, and the environment. GIA is a leading proponent for racial equity in arts philanthropy and policy changes at the federal level in arts education, arts and aging and juvenile justice. May joined the S.C. Arts Commission in 1985 and was named executive director in 2010. He has played a key role in the creation of many of the agency’s nationally recognized programs and partnerships in arts education, community design, public participation in the arts, rural arts development, and career development for artists. May has served as a panelist and site-visitor for the National Endowment for the Arts; a panelist, presenter, consultant, and facilitator for national, state, and local arts organizations; and a guest lecturer in arts administration programs at the College of Charleston and Winthrop University. He is a member of the board of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, South Arts, and South Carolina Afterschool Alliance, and is an alumnus fellow of the Diversity Leaders Initiative of the Riley Institute at Furman University. May has worked previously as a professional musician. He received undergraduate and master’s degrees in music history and musicology from Florida State University. Others elected to the GIA board of directors are: Jaime Dempsey, deputy director of Arizona Commission on the Arts; and Sharnita Johnson, arts program director of The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Re-elected to a second term are Denise Brown, executive director of Leeway Foundation; Kerry McCarthy, program director – thriving communities at The New York Community Trust; and Angelique Power, president of The Field Foundation of Illinois. Beginning in 2017, Power will assume a two-year term as chair of GIA, while McCarthy will serve as vice chair. Via: Grantmakers in the Arts

Consultant: Hilton Head Island should create new arts funding source, plan new venue

From the Island Packet:

Hilton Head Island residents overwhelmingly believe a vibrant arts scene and cultural life is extremely important to the island. And they're willing to pay for it. Those were among the findings of survey results presented to Town Council on Wednesday by consulting firm Cultural Planning Group. The firm was hired to suggest ways to get the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina and other arts groups on solid financial footing, determine the town's role in supporting them, and suggest what should be done about the center's costly maintenance and repair needs. It conducted an online survey and community meetings in October to gauge support for the programs and the willingness to fund them. According to the results, the town should play a major role in supporting and expanding arts, culture and entertainment on the island, said firm partner Martin Cohen. Of the 2,170 responses received:
  • More than 70 percent believe the town should either "fully" support and expand arts, culture and entertainment, or play a "major" part in that effort.
  • More than 70 percent also favor paying as much as $25 per capita in annual taxes to pay for such offerings.
  • Nearly three-fourths want more, affordable options for live music, dance and theater performances.
Some, though, question the reliability of the survey results since participants were not randomly selected. When participants are "self-selected," bias can be introduced, according to experts. People who feel strongly about an issue tend to participate, while those who are lukewarm might not, Mayor Drew Laughlin said. He and other council members worried respondents might not be representative of the population as a whole. Cohen argued bias is inherent in any survey by those who choose to take it. "This should be taken as a broad indicator of the level of support in the community," he said. "We did learn there is extraordinary high interest in the arts and expectation the town participate in the arts and cultural development of the community." The firm suggested the town establish an arts commission to advise council and serve as a central cultural planning and coordinating agency. It also suggested the town establish a dedicated funding source independent of tourism -- such as property taxes -- to pay for its support of the arts . The town funds some arts and culture groups through tax collections on short-term lodging, with a focus on tourism development. However, nearly two-thirds of the arts groups on the island primarily serve residents. The island has an abundance of artistic and cultural resources with nearly 40 arts and cultural organizations, far more than would be expected in a community of 38,000 residents, Cohen said. But, while Hilton Head is relatively affluent, it does not have a base of corporate and foundational funding to support those groups. As a result, the island is "arts rich but arts facility poor," consultant Jerry Allen said. The firm recommended the town begin planning now for a new 700- to 1,000-seat performing arts venue. In the meantime, it should develop a short-term plan to maintain the Arts Center. Council directed the consultants to return in February with a detailed look at possible funding sources and short- and long-term plans to address facility needs.
Via: Island Packet