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Tuning Up: HBCU artists + Florence arts grants + go for Baroque

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Twiggs curates TJC Gallery exhibition on HBCU artists. The recipient of virtually every major arts award South Carolina offers is back in the spotlight with a new exhibition in Spartanburg that coincides quite nicely with Black History Month. “Elevation from Within: The Study of Art at Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” opens tomorrow and runs through May 10. Admission varies; More info here. Grant opportunity for Florence County artists and arts organizations. From the Florence Regional Arts Alliance: apply now for grants from the FRAA's Quarterly Grants Program for Organizations & Individual Artists. It's designed to provide support for a wide variety of quality arts projects, as well as for professional development opportunities for artists and arts administrators. Organizations must be based in Florence County with a Florence County mailing address and be registered charitable organizations with federal non-profit status. Individual artists must be practicing artists in dance, literature, music, theatre or the visual arts and have a Florence County mailing address. Individual artists must be over the age of 18 at the time of application. Application deadline is May 15. Go for Baroque. (It's obligatory, and we're not sorry. - Ed.) And we're back in Spartanburg as Wofford College celebrates the visual art and music of the European Baroque period of the 17th and 18th centuries with a special exhibition, a concert of music from the period and presentations about the exhibit. (Story from GoUpstate.com) And finally... Columbia TV station WLTX looked at the arts in South Carolina with three #SCArtists during a Facebook Live event last night.

Unified auditions coming for Upstate actors

Registration deadline: Tuesday, Feb. 5, 2019


Be seen by casting directors for Upstate theatres

Brought to you by the South Carolina Theatre Association
  • Actors should prepare a 60 second monologue
    • Must be from a published play
    • Must be memorized
    • No costumes, please
  • Musical theatre actors should prepare 90 seconds of monologue and song
    • Must be from a published play or musical
    • Must be memorized
    • Must provide your own sheet music (we will provide the accompanist)
    • You can use the 90 seconds however you wish (all song, or song and monologue)
  • Technicians should prepare a presentation of their work.
    • Must bring your portfolio
    • May bring any examples.
    • You and your portfolio will be posted in a room for the casting directors to come visit and chat with you during their lunch break.
  • All auditionees including technicians will be included in the e-book that will be provided to participating theatres.  Upon registration you will receive and email requesting you to submit your resume and headshot.  If technicians have an on-line portfolio they can submit that link as well.  No paper copies will be accepted.
  • Please note: the Upstate Unified Auditions are opens to theatre artists age 8 and up. (18 and older on 2/16; ages 8-17 on 2/17)
  • If you have questions or issues registering, please contact Anita Sleeman: asleeman@southcarolinatheatre.org.
Go here to register now!

S.C. Art Education Association honors West Main Artists Co-op

West Main Artists Co-op in Spartanburg received the 2018 “Business Supporter of the Year” award from the South Carolina Art Education Association. The award was presented to Co-op chair Beth Regula on Dec. 1 in Greenville by Cindy Riddle, the association’s president-elect and assistant superintendent of visual & performing arts for Spartanburg School District 1. “On behalf of West Main Artists Co-op, I want to thank everyone who has worked to make this recognition possible,” Regula said. “I want to especially thank Jane Nodine and Susanne Gunter for taking the initiative to write the letters of recommendation. Most importantly, I want to thank the member artists of West Main Artists Co-op because they are the ones who are out in the community and here in our studios and galleries finding creative ways for the Co-op to be involved and relevant. There is indeed a business side to art, and West Main Artists Co-op works very hard to be an active, and creative, member of the business community.” In her letter of support, Nodine, who is distinguished professor emerita of USC Upstate, said, “USC Upstate Art has maintained studio space at WMAC and offered that as an annual award to a deserving student. We have sponsored and partnered with WMAC in workshops and group exhibitions, and USC Upstate students have worked at the Co-op in internships that earn them academic credit and give them valuable field experience.” Dr. Gunter, chair for art and design at Converse College, said in her letter, “WMAC is a true partner to area schools, colleges, and universities. This fall, students in the Converse Arts Management program will be working to help with the first annual multi-state juried exhibition, providing students with a unique opportunity to assist with all levels of administrative tasks to put on a major exhibition. WMAC provides ‘work residencies’ to help struggling artists to provide a studio and membership. This is critical to the success of many young artist, in particular.” South Carolina Art Education Foundation (Association) is a chapter of the National Art Education Association (NAEA), which advances visual arts education to fulfill human potential and promote global understanding. NAEA is dedicated to providing you with connectivity, resources, and opportunities to enrich your classroom, enhance your career, and inspire your creativity. Connect to a worldwide network of like-minded artists and educators representing K-12 art educators and administrators, college and university professors, preservice students studying art education, researchers and scholars, museum educators, teaching artists, and more. The mission of West Main Artists Cooperative is to create a community of artists wherein members mentor and support one another; to provide affordable studio, display, and performance space to established and emerging artists living in and around Spartanburg, South Carolina; and to provide the public with opportunities to view original art and to interact with the artists. To learn more about WMAC, please visit WestMainArtists.org.

3D metal and glass fusion studios coming to Spartanburg

Chapman Cultural Center announced last week that it received an $80,000 grant from the Timken Family Foundation of Canton, Ohio. The grant will support the construction of a 3D Metal and Glass Fusion studios at the soon to be open Mayfair Art Studios in the Arcadia neighborhood of Spartanburg. Scott Lamitina, HR Manager of The Timken Company’s Duncan location, said: “The Timken Foundation of Canton has a long-standing tradition of supporting the arts and education initiatives within the communities for which the Timken Company operates. The Mayfair Art Studios project is a great example of how the local community can come together to make art, learn about each other’s cultures, and build a new, vibrant, and economically sustainable community.” Mayfair Art Studios (right), scheduled to open in the first quarter of 2019, will feature a variety of arts studios that will support over 200 artists annually. Located in the Arcadia community, 4 miles west of Downtown Spartanburg, the studios will offer affordable space for artist, musicians, performers, and other creatives. The 3D Metal and Glass Fusion studios will be available to rent by the hour and provide a collaborative studio experience for artists to work together on projects. With this investment, Chapman Cultural Center will be able to offer classes, workforce development training, and scholarships to neighborhood residents. “We are absolutely thrilled to receive this support from the Timken family,” said Brad Wright, Corporate Giving Manager for Chapman Cultural Center “We were already grateful to have local Timken support for our education programs from the Duncan distribution center, but to receive this kind of support from the family foundation is truly overwhelming. To see a family with so much business investment in the area that understands the community’s needs and invest in us is a wonderful and encouraging experience. This generous gift will have a lasting positive impact for Arcadia and our entire community.”
About Chapman Cultural Center
Our mission is to provide cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens. Visit our website to learn more.

About The Timken Company
The Timken Company (NYSE: TKR; www.timken.com) engineers, manufactures and markets bearings, gear drives, automated lubrication systems, belts, chain, couplings and linear motion products, and offers a spectrum of powertrain rebuild and repair services. The leading authority on tapered roller bearings, Timken today applies its deep knowledge of metallurgy, tribology and power transmission across a variety of bearings and related systems to improve the reliability and efficiency of machinery and equipment all around the world.
The company’s growing product and services portfolio features many strong industrial brands including Timken®, Fafnir®, Philadelphia Gear®, Groeneveld®, Rollon® and Cone Drive®. Known for its quality products and collaborative technical sales model, Timken posted $3 billion in sales in 2017. With more than 17,000 employees operating from 33 countries, Timken makes the world more productive and keeps industry in motion.

Tuning Up: In with the “new new”

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Arts-related construction projects are apparently the rage in South Carolina. Here are a couple new ones The Hub learned about this week. - Ed. SPARTANBURG By developing the Mayfair Art Studios (above), Chapman Cultural Center (CCC) will establish a new cultural destination on the Westside that creates a unique space for creative exchange and grassroots entrepreneurship. The desire is to engage both amateur and professional artists in a holistic experience of creativity within a neighborhood setting. "Our hope is the studios will be a dynamic arts incubator in the Arcadia village, that will bring together a diverse constituency to learn about and make art," according to the CCC "Connect" email. Go here to learn more. WEST COLUMBIA Much is made about Columbia's gradual reinvention, but a quick glance across the Congaree River is all you need to know it's spreading into Lexington County too, with construction projects obvious on the river's opposite banks in Cayce and West Columbia. The latter broke ground Tuesday on an interactive art park:

The park is billed as one-of-a-kind that will feature musical events, art displays, artists booths and a farmer’s market. It also offers parking space for patrons of the area’s restaurants and users of Riverwalk.

The park is expected to open in April.  

Johnson Collection announces 2019 Voices in American Art speaker

The Johnson Collection announced yesterday that Dr. Tuliza Fleming, Curator of American Art at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), Smithsonian Institution, as the 2019 Voices in American Art distinguished speaker. The sixth annual edition of the educational series is scheduled for 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, and will be held at Chapman Cultural Center in downtown Spartanburg. As always, the public is invited to attend the free lecture; no reservations are required. Dr. Fleming received her MA and PhD in American art history from the University of Maryland, College Park (1997 and 2007) and her BA from Spelman College (1994). During her tenure at the NMAAHC, she worked to build the museum’s foundational American art collection, and supervised the creation of a collection-based multi-media interactive presentation. She also co-curated the traveling exhibition Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing: How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment, curated Clementine Hunter: Life on Melrose Plantation, and served as the lead curator for the museum’s inaugural exhibition Visual Art and the American Experience. Formerly, Dr. Fleming served in the position of Associate Curator and head of the Department of American Art at the Dayton Art Institute in Dayton, Ohio. Since 1996, Dr. Fleming has curated over twenty exhibitions and worked and/or consulted for a variety of museums and cultural institutions. Her publications include, “Visual Art and the American Experience: Creating an Art Gallery in a History and Culture Museum,” Art and Public History: Approaches, Opportunities, and Challenges (Rowan and Littlefield, 2017); “Cover Stories: The Fusion of Art and Literature During the Harlem Renaissance,” Dream a World Anew: The African American Experience and the Shaping of America (Smithsonian Books, 2016); “The Convergence of Aesthetics, Politics and Culture: Jeff Donaldson’s Wives of Shango,” AfriCOBRA: Philosophy (The University of Chicago, 2013); “It’s Showtime! The Birth of the Apollo Theater,” Ain’t Nothing Like the Real Thing: How the Apollo Theater Shaped American Entertainment (Smithsonian Books, 2010); “The ‘Museum Baby’ Grows Up: Being a Curator of Color in a Monochromatic Art Museum World,” Museum News (July/August 2005); and, Breaking Racial Barriers: African American Portraits in the Harmon Foundation Collection (Pomegranate Press, 1997). Established in 2014, Voices in American Art brings distinguished arts leaders from important national institutions to Spartanburg for annual presentations. In addition to an evening keynote lecture that is open to the public at no charge, visiting speakers meet with college students for informal master classes on career paths.

Tuning Up: SCAC fellow’s new play to debut + Camden gallery’s season opens

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


SCAC fellowship recipient to debut new play. “Boy About Ten” will debut Aug. 17 and run until Aug. 25 on the Thigpen Main Stage at Columbia’s Trustus Theatre. It is playwright Dr. Jon Tuttle's sixth world premier at Trustus, where he is resident playwright. Tuttle received the SCAC's fellowship for playwriting in 2000. Read more on "Boy About Ten" and Tuttle from the Morning News/SC Now. Bassett Gallery opens new season. "Tuning Up" is happy for a quick check-in just up U.S. 1 in Camden, where grantee the Fine Arts Center is set to open the 2018/2019 Bassett Gallery season on Thursday night. Camden artist Dot Goodwin's exhibition "Life with HeART" is first up. Spartanburg 1 touts ABC Project grants. Spartanburg School District 1 scored the largest percentage of ABC — Arts in Basic Curriculum — grant funding of any district in the state, according to the Herald-Journal. The total amount headed to the district is $67,000 distributed among seven district schools. Thanks for promoting your grant!
[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="251"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] ICYMI: Calling all potters! The Macon (Ga.) Arts Alliance would like to share with you Fired Works 2019 Regional Ceramics Exhibition and Sale featuring 60 potters from Georgia and the Southeast to be held April 5-14, 2019 in ... Macon, Georgia. The entry fee and exhibition are free to the exhibitors. Get, ahem, fired up! Hard details here. Let's show them what #SCArtists can do! (The deadline is Dec. 1, so we'll remind you once or twice between now and then.)

South Carolina’s largest private art collection

The Hub will pardon you if you get a little disoriented here, but bear with us. [caption id="attachment_36014" align="alignright" width="600"] The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet's Assault, July 3, 1863 - James Walker[/caption] What happens when Charleston's daily newspaper writes a feature on the state's largest private art collection, which happens to be in Spartanburg? You get a story that's worth every moment it takes to read. Seriously. Hats off to Adam Parker of the Post & Courier for this feature piece on the ultra-significant Johnson Collection. (Ed. note: The Hub checked in on The Johnson Collection a couple weeks ago when it gifted the above work to the Spartanburg County Public Library.)

But don’t think all this art is sequestered away in a private residence somewhere for the sole enjoyment of the Johnson family. What began as a simple interest in collecting fine art of the Carolinas has become a public enterprise. The inventory has grown so much that it requires a small staff to manage it.

The enterprise is unusual. It’s not a nonprofit. It has no board of directors. It can’t accept donations. It provides no tax benefit to its operators. It generates no revenue. Rather, it is a philanthropic venture with millions of dollars in annual expenditures.

To borrow a line from our friends at the S.C. Arts Alliance, make this today's lunchtime reading.  

Massive ‘Gettysburg’ painting finds new home in Spartanburg

It began as a temporary visit. [caption id="attachment_36014" align="aligncenter" width="600"] The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet's Assault, July 3, 1863 - James Walker[/caption] On loan for a time from the Johnson Collection, The Battle of Gettysburg: Repulse of Longstreet’s Assault, July 3, 1863 will now not be checking out of the Spartanburg County Public Libraries’ permanent collection. On display since May 2016 in the Moseley Gallery at the Headquarters Library, the panoramic painting records the dramatic sweep, as well as particular details, of the longest—and bloodiest—engagement of the American Civil War. The defeat of Confederate forces in the Pennsylvania countryside marked a critical turning point in the conflict’s outcome. A gift from Susu and George Dean Johnson, Jr., it measures 20 feet in length and over seven feet in height. The monumental canvas was acquired by the Johnson Collection in 2004. In an effort to increase its visibility and maximize its teaching potential, the library leadership and Johnson family initiated a public-private partnership in 2016 which resulted in the work’s relocation from a corporate headquarters to the Moseley Gallery. At its new—and now permanent—home, the painting is available to the Headquarters Library’s nearly 500,000 annual visitors. “Understanding our nation’s complex past is perhaps the best way to prepare for its future,” George Johnson noted. “America’s history belongs to its people, and by placing this remarkable document in public hands, we hope to ensure that the moments it records and the lessons it imparts are accessible to everyone.” “The Libraries’ Board of Trustees and the Friends of the Spartanburg County Libraries are grateful and honored that the Johnson family, who have been long-time patrons of the Library, are entrusting us with The Battle of Gettysburg,” says Mary Speed Lynch, Chair of the Spartanburg County Public Libraries' Trustees. “This widely renowned and much celebrated work of art is an invaluable resource for scholars, art lovers, students and historians.” Read more about how the library is displaying the work from the Spartanburg Herald-Journal.


The Battle of Gettysburg was executed by James Walker (1819-1889), an English immigrant who earned accolades as a painter of battle scenes during the Mexican War, skills he later put to use making sketches of key Civil War conflicts. After the war, Walker began to collaborate with John Badger Bachelder (1825-1894), a photographer and topographic artist who had been attached to the Union army as an illustrator. In the immediate aftermath of the 1863 conflict, Bachelder began an on-site study of the scene and the principals involved. The resulting isometric map led to Walker’s commission to create a massive painting that details the battle’s particulars. Completed in 1870, Walker’s grand canvas captures the dramatic conclusion of the three-day battle, which marked a turning point in the war’s tide. Bachelder’s meticulous research and Walker’s precise technical skill combined to produce an epic visual record of the event, including regimental positions, combat vignettes, Union and Confederate soldiers, noble steeds, victory, and defeat.
Established in 2002, the Johnson Collection includes more than 1,200 works of fine art relating to the American South. Those works are made available to the public at numerous locations throughout Spartanburg, including TJC Gallery, located at 154 West Main St. This exhibition space hosts rotating exhibitions drawn from the collection’s holdings and is open to the public at no charge on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m., as well as during the city’s monthly Art Walk. In addition, large-scale exhibitions travel to museums across the Southeast. The collection’s newest book, Central to Their Lives: Southern Women Artists in the Johnson Collection was released in June by the University of South Carolina Press. That publication’s companion exhibition is presently on view at the Georgia Museum of Art in Athens, and will travel to six additional venues in six different states through 2021. The mission of the Spartanburg County Public Libraries is to create, connect, change.

Submitted material

South Arts grants support “Southern Creative Places”

South Arts, a nonprofit regional arts organization serving nine Southern states, has announced $78,189 in grants to 18 communities in the region. South Arts LogoThese grants, made possible through funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the Georgia Council for the Arts, support the planning and execution of creative placemaking projects predominantly in small and rural communities in the South. “Creative placemaking uses arts and culture to activate and animate communities,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “Creative placemaking puts arts, culture and creativity at the center of planning and problem-solving. It brings people and partners together to design creative solutions to community challenges using arts and culture as catalysts. The results can be more connected communities, enhanced quality of life, more economic opportunities, and the showcasing of a community’s most unique characteristics.” The grants, which must be matched by the recipient organization, support organizations in South Arts’ region. Organizations applied this spring and were recently notified of their status. “In our new strategic plan, South Arts has made a commitment to address the evolving needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs,” continued Surkamer. “Supporting these creative placemaking efforts – from a small-business incubator for creative entrepreneurs to public art projects embracing civic pride and even a project using the arts to promote healthy eating and locally-grown produce – is an important step in serving the cross-sector needs of our region through the arts.” The Southern Creative Places grant program represents South Arts’ first programmatic offering in the arena of creative placemaking, following up on its successful co-sponsorship of the Creative Placemaking Leadership Summit in March 2018 in Chattanooga. For more information about opportunities from South Arts, visit www.southarts.org.


About South Arts South Arts advances Southern vitality through the arts. The nonprofit regional arts organization was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to support the success of artists and arts providers in the South, address the needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs, and celebrate the excellence, innovation, value and power of the arts of the South. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.
S.C. Grant Recipients
  • The Chapman Cultural Center in Spartanburg received a $5,000 grant to establish a cultural center in the majority Hispanic community of Arcadia.
  • The City of Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs received a $5,000 grant to implement the conNECKted Too project, pairing artists with tiny businesses in an isolated part of Charleston.
  • Fresh Future Farm, Inc. in Charleston received a $3,038 grant for a community mural project celebrating community history and promoting healthy, locally-grown foods.
  • The Holly Springs Center in Pickens received a $4,365 grant to present a festival of Appalachian arts on the grounds of a former school.
  • The Town of Estill received a $3,375 grant to create a mural celebrating diversity.