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Extension announced for folklife project grants

Furthering South Carolina's living traditions

Application deadline now Friday, March 22
The S.C. Arts Commission's Folklife & Traditional Arts (FLK) Grants support non-profit organizations that seek to promote and preserve the traditional arts practiced across the state. Traditional arts are expressions of shared identity that are learned as a part of the cultural life of a particular group. This shared identity may be rooted in family, geographic, tribal, occupational, religious, ethnic or other connections. As expressions of a living culture, traditional arts have been handed down from one generation to the next and reflect the shared experience, aesthetics and values of a group. The purpose of the FLK Grant is to ensure that South Carolina’s living traditions remain vibrant and visible parts of community life. To this end, we fund projects that may include the following:
  • Presentation of Traditional Artists through workshops, concerts, festivals, exhibitions, radio programs, recordings, etc.
  • Documentation of Traditional Arts and/or Folklife of S.C. (Such a project must result in some form of public presentation.)
  • Cultural Survey – Fieldwork done to identify traditions and traditional artists
  • Production, Documentation and/or Distribution of a traditional artist’s work; for example, the production of publicity materials
  • Acquisition of difficult-to-obtain materials or equipment needed to create traditional art
  • Conservation – Projects, such as apprenticeships, that serve to keep a traditional art form vibrant and visible
Projects can receive funding up to and including $6,000. These grants go to non-profit organizations and government entities and must be matched 1:1. Priority for funding is given to projects that provide recognition and support for South Carolina’s traditional art forms and their practitioners. Read more about FLK Grants from the S.C. Arts Commission here.
The Folklife and Traditional Arts Program is a partnership with McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina. 
The main image on The Hub's home page is 2018 Folk Heritage Award recipient J. Michael King of Greenville.

Tuning Up: Arts job at SCAC, arts ed, and more

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


We're hiring... but not for long! The deadline to apply for the SCAC's community arts coordinator position is coming to a close soon. The deadline is Tuesday, March 19. Cool story, Spartan-bros. Chapman Cultural Center is celebrating Youth Art Month. There's a reception TODAY at CCC from 4-7 p.m. To highlight the importance of arts education, they put a local spin on the research results from the Gallup Student Poll (conducted in arts-rich South Carolina schools) that the SCAC released last month. Johnsons donate to IAAM Susu and George Dean Johnson, Jr. of the Johnson Collection Gallery in Spartanburg are helping to create additional cultural offerings in South Carolina by pledging a $1 million gift toward the creation of the International African American Museum in Charleston. Governor's School announces 'Grand Jete' winners The first annual Grand Jeté student dance competition, hosted by the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, featured 47 dancers, ages 10-19, from eight dance schools across the state, including one independent dancer. Here's who came away with prizes.

Arts education leader Christine Fisher announces retirement

Fisher led Arts in Basic Curriculum Project for 18 years


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 13 March 2019 [caption id="attachment_39351" align="alignright" width="225"]Christine Fisher Christine Fisher[/caption] COLUMBIA, S.C. – Christine Fisher is to retire from the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project this month after spending nearly 20 years working to provide comprehensive arts programs in schools across the state. Fisher, who lives in Florence, began her career in arts education in the classroom, teaching chorus, guitar and musical production at Dillon High School and then elementary general music, beginning band and middle school band in Florence School District One through 2001. She left that year to become executive director of the ABC Project, a partnership among the S.C. Arts Commission, Winthrop University, and S.C. Department of Education that works with schools and districts across the state to maintain and expand arts opportunities for all students. It is based at Winthrop in Rock Hill. Under Fisher’s leadership, the program grew to serve 84 schools or districts and 171,000 students this school year and played an important role in making sure the arts were included in the landmark Profile of the South Carolina Graduate in 2015, a rigorous set of standards for college and career readiness adopted by the state General Assembly in 2016. “Christine Fisher has spent her entire career being a tireless advocate and supporter of arts based education in South Carolina. I am so appreciative of Christine’s leadership from being the only music teacher to be named our state teacher of the year to her service as the director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project where she has brought access to the arts to students across our state and shared her tremendous wealth of knowledge with countless educators. I along with South Carolina’s arts community will miss her dearly,” S.C. Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said. Many highlights dot the timeline of Fisher’s career. She was twice selected as a school and district Teacher of the Year, and twice selected as one of the five South Carolina honor roll teachers. Selected as the South Carolina Teacher of the Year in 1998, she is the only music teacher to hold the honor in the program's history. The S.C. Arts Commission awarded her state’s highest arts award, the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts, in 2006, and she received the Winthrop University Medal of Arts in 2012. “She has changed many thousands of young lives for the better. They, and we, owe her heartfelt thanks and praise for her life of unselfish, tireless devotion to arts education for everyone. We wish her nothing but the best in her retirement—and more time for music-making,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said.

Full Statements on Christine Fisher's retirement

MOLLY SPEARMAN S.C. Superintendent of Education

“Christine Fisher has spent her entire career being a tireless advocate and supporter of arts based education in South Carolina. I am so appreciative of Christine’s leadership from being the only music teacher to be named our state teacher of the year to her service as the director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project where she has brought access to the arts to students across our state and shared her tremendous wealth of knowledge with countless educators. I along with South Carolina’s arts community will miss her dearly.”

KEN MAY Executive Director, S.C. Arts Commission

“The first time I ever heard Christine Fisher speak, she told the moving and powerful story of how the arts, specifically music, saved her life. As I reflect now on her retirement, I realize that all of her work, her entire amazing career, has been about paying forward—at increasing orders of magnitude—the wonderful, transformative gift that she was given. From her early days teaching in Dillon and Florence, to her ground-breaking tenure as State Teacher of the Year, to her long, outstanding service as Executive Director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, she has changed many thousands of young lives for the better. They, and we, owe her heartfelt thanks and praise for her life of unselfish, tireless devotion to arts education for everyone. We wish her nothing but the best in her retirement—and more time for music-making!”

JEFF BELLANTONI Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Winthrop University

“Christine has been an integral part of the arts community at Winthrop University for 18 years. We had the pleasure of recognizing the impact she has made in 2012 when she was awarded our Medal of Honor in the Arts. Her passion and commitment to integrating the arts into education throughout the state is unmatched. Christine’s steadfast support of the arts is evident through her many years of service as an educator and arts advocate, and she will be missed.”


About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

Introducing Arts Project Support Grants

Quarterly project grants get makeover

Artists and organizations like grants. The South Carolina Arts Commission likes to give them. Artists and organizations are happy when grants are easy to get. The South Carolina Arts Commission likes happy artists and arts organizations. And everyone is going to like the new structure for what were Quarterly Project Support Grants for artists and organizations, rebooted and now known as Arts Project Support Grants.

So, what’s new? Here are some highlights:

  • MATCHING: Organizations match the grant 1:1 now instead of 2:1
  • DEADLINES: Instead of four quarterly deadlines, how about a rolling deadline? Just apply by at least six weeks before your project begins. And summertime projects can be supported by May 15 instead of Feb. 15.
  • LIMITS: Applications can be submitted simultaneously, for separate projects. (The limit is still two awards per year.)
  • REPORTING: Final report deadlines are individualized for each grantee based on project timeline, one month after end of project but not later than June 1st.
  • TURNAROUND: Technology streamlines the standard timeline to four weeks from submission to notification.
Funding remains up to $1,000 based on project budget and applicant’s ability to match, but these changes are designed to make the grants easier to get and reduce the burden on artists and organizations. Applications will be accepted beginning March 15! If you have a project that will occur between June 1st and July 1st, you must contact the Grants Office for access to apply. Learn more by going here.

2019 Verner Award to honor nine South Carolinians

State's highest arts honor recognizes outstanding achievement and contributions

Awards to be presented May 1 at S.C. Arts Awards


COLUMBIA, S.C. – Nine South Carolinians are to be honored by the South Carolina Arts Commission with the 2019 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts—the state’s highest arts honor. The following recipients from their respective categories are being recognized for outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina:
  • LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT:  Cecil Williams, Orangeburg
  • ARTIST:  Tyrone Geter, Columbia
  • INDIVIDUAL:  Kathleen (Kathi) P. Bateson, Hilton Head Island
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION: Simeon Warren, Charleston (Individual) S.C. African American Heritage Commission, Hartsville (Organization)
  • BUSINESS:  Hampton III Gallery, Taylors
  • GOVERNMENT:  Florence County Museum, Florence
  • ORGANIZATION: Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston Columbia Stage Society (Town Theatre), Columbia (Special Award)
Print and web images of recipients available here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/plf40ffa55oxh5g/AAAksiSWeKNQxxytp5yBM8DQa?dl=0 “It is an honor and privilege to recognize individuals and organizations who live out the service, commitment and passion that help the arts thrive in South Carolina,” S.C. Arts Commission Chairman Henry Horowitz said. “Each of the Verner Award recipients makes a tremendous contribution not just locally, but they are honored for broad impact on the state’s arts community and beyond. These are outstanding ambassadors for our state." A diverse committee, appointed by the S.C. Arts Commission Board of Directors and drawn from members of the South Carolina community at large, reviews all nominations and, after a rigorous process, makes recommendations to the board for final approval after a series of panel meetings produces a recommendation from each category. The 2019 Verner Awards will be presented with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards at South Carolina Arts Awards sponsored by Colonial Life on Wednesday, May 1 in a morning ceremony at the USC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia). The S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients afterward during a fundraising luncheon. South Carolina artists’ work will be on sale to support the programs of the S.C. Arts Commission. Luncheon tickets are $50 per person and are to be available for purchase by mid-March. For more about the Verner Awards or the S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon, call 803.734.8696 or visit SouthCarolinaArts.com.

About the Verner Award Recipients

Cecil Williams (Lifetime Achievement), an Orangeburg native, is a professional photographer, videographer, publisher, inventor, author, and architect best known for his photographic documentation of the struggle to achieve freedom, justice, and equality during the Civil Rights struggle. By the age of 9, he had already begun his career in photography and by 15 was working professionally as a freelancer for such publications as JET and the Afro-American, and as an Associated Press stringer. The teenaged Williams documented segregated life in the Jim Crow era and the Clarendon movement that led to Briggs v. Elliott in the 1950s, countless protests and then desegregation at Clemson University and the University of South Carolina and was there for the Orangeburg Massacre in 1968. Williams, who received an art degree from Claflin University, owns Cecil Williams Photography, LLC and was recently appointed by Claflin as its historic preservationist. Williams is also recipient of the Order of the Palmetto, the state’s highest award to an individual, and Governor’s Award in the Humanities from SC Humanities. In a career that spreads across continents, Tyrone Geter (Artist Category) has built an international reputation as a world-class artist, painter, sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. Recently retired associate professor of art at Benedict College in Columbia, Geter received his Master of Fine Arts from Ohio University in 1978 with an emphasis on painting and drawing. In 1979, he relocated to Africa, living, drawing, and painting among the Fulani and local peoples of Northern Nigeria, “a lesson in the creative process that no art school would ever teach me.” Since, he has illustrated 30 children’s books, exhibited on four continents, and after relocating to South Carolina, until recently taught painting and drawing at Benedict and curated its Ponder Fine Arts Gallery. Kathleen (Kathi) P. Bateson (Individual Category) is president/CEO and executive producer of the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina – a past Verner Award recipient in the organization category. She is past president of the S.C. Arts Alliance board, served as chair and founding co-chair of the Arts & Cultural Council of Hilton Head; and was a founding member and is chair of the Community Foundation of the Lowcountry’s Women in Philanthropy. Bateson is founder and president of Management for the Arts, a national firm specializing in NPO organizational restructure, institutional planning, strategic positioning and new business ventures. She has served as a cultural representative on international delegations to South Africa, China and Japan, and is herself a goldsmith and professional set designer. Simeon A. Warren (Arts in Education Individual Category) is a cathedral-trained stone carver, sculptor, and conservator. He holds a degree from the Glasgow (Scotland) School of the Arts, and his career has led to stone work at or on some of England’s major cathedrals (and even Buckingham Palace). In 2001 he emigrated to Charleston, where he was a founding faculty member at what became the American College of Building Arts in 2004. He developed college-level courses for professors, delivered the college’s licenses to recruit and to teach, hired the college’s faculty, and served as dean from 2006 to 2013. Warren owns a private architectural stone practice and is developing The Stone People Project, among other public art projects. The S.C. African American Heritage Commission (Arts in Education Organization Category) identifies and promotes the preservation of historic sites, structures, buildings, and culture of the African American experience in South Carolina, and assists and enhances the efforts of the S.C. Department of Archives and History. SCAAHC is a leader in integrating the arts into education resources, publishing the “Supplement to the Teacher’s Guide Integrating Art into Classroom Instruction” in 2016 and a subsequent revision last year. Since 1970, Hampton III Gallery (Business Category) has supported professional living artists and the estates of professional artists in or from South Carolina ranging from post WWII to the present. Hampton III Gallery’s vision of supporting artists and educating the public to the rich heritage of South Carolina artists continues into 2019. South Carolina’s oldest gallery has more than 500 paintings, sculptures and original prints in inventory. Changing exhibitions, artists’ talks, and special events provide educational opportunities for all. Consultation is available for private and corporate collections. Exhibitions change every 6-8 weeks. The public is invited to all events. The Florence County Museum (FCM) (Government Category) reflects the region’s rich artistic, cultural and historic heritage. Its permanent collection currently includes eight works by celebrated 20th century African American artist and Florence native, William H. Johnson and it is home to The Wright Collection of Southern Art, a volume of over 140 works representing some of the finest in 20th century Southern art (including some by Elizabeth O’Neill Verner). The FCM provides a platform for contemporary artists as host of the Pee Dee Regional Art Competition, South Carolina’s oldest juried art competition, since 1954. Since 1905, the Gibbes Museum of Art (Organization Category) has been a center for creativity for the visual arts. It provides more than 100 educational programs and events. Nine galleries spanning 300 years of art history are showcased to 60,000 visitors a year who discover, enjoy, and are inspired by the creative process. The museum loans 50 objects a year to the major U.S. art museums. Dynamic year-round programming engages, and the Gibbes continually develops new multi-dimensional education and outreach programs that expand the museum experience while offering exhibitions that stay relevant to current topics. Celebrating its 100th season in 2018/2019, Columbia Stage Society’s Town Theatre (Organization Category Special Award) provides quality, live, family-oriented community theatre and entry-level experience for those who wish to participate on or off stage. Every performance has open auditions, with all community members being encouraged to attend. On stage, Town Theatre’s current and alumni performers have appeared on Broadway, network television and in major feature films. Off stage, ample opportunity exists for community members to get involved as costumers, as set and backstage crew, by helping in the box office, or as ushers and house managers.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

S.C. Arts Commission budget request clears hurdles 1 and 2

Additional funding heads to the House floor in March

The FY20 state budget is making its way through state government on schedule, and it includes an increase for the S.C. Arts Commission. When arts advocates from around South Carolina gathered at the Statehouse two weeks ago for Arts Advocacy Day, they were hoping to convince legislators to include additional recurring funding for the S.C. Arts Commission for a total of $865,000, of which $785,000 would head back into the state as grant funding. Specifically, requested funds will:
  • Help keep pace with growth in the statewide network of community arts providers through Operating Support Grants to local arts organizations ($350,000);
  • Maintain and build upon promising new approaches to arts development in rural, high-poverty counties ($110,000);
  • Provide learning and career development opportunities for working arts professionals and artists ($75,000);
  • Respond to increasing demand for expanded arts education in K-12 schools statewide and build upon promising new models for summer learning through the arts that have been piloted in some of the state’s most challenged rural school districts ($250,000)
 Together, these grant funds will help the Arts Commission make significant progress toward the goal of $1 per capita for grants. Currently we have $0.59 per capita, and this new investment would bring that figure to $0.75. An additional $80,000 would help the agency pay an additional staff member. Last week, first the S.C. House Ways and Means education development subcommittee and then the full Ways and Means Committee both approved the SCAC request and sent it to the House floor for deliberations to occur beginning March 11. Monitor The Hub and/or South Carolina Arts Alliance for updates.

S.C. Arts Commission looking for new community arts coordinator

Application deadline: Tuesday, March 19, 2019


The S.C. Arts Commission is seeking an energetic, creative, and resourceful Community Arts Coordinator with experience in arts administration, community arts development, and leadership in the arts.  The ideal candidate will share the agency’s mission and values and have the ability to build and maintain relationships among a broad cross-section of local arts councils, community organizations, businesses, governments, arts organizations, and school districts, as well as education and community leaders to support SCAC programs and services statewide. The person in this role:
  • works collaboratively with diverse constituency to implement SCAC programs
  • directs the planning and implementation of SCAC programs/projects
  • coordinates programming to serve communities and local arts organizations statewide
  • coordinates agency efforts to support creative placemaking and arts-based community development statewide
  • manages projects/programs for SCAC, including the coordination of data/information gathering, analysis, synthesis, and dissemination of information
  • develops short and long-term planning goals, annual work-plan, and budget for SCAC assigned projects/programs in accordance with agency mission, values and strategic plan; assists with securing funding for future program development
  • negotiates agreements and contracts for programs/projects in accordance with established policies and procedures
  • serves as a county coordinator, which is the commission's liaison with arts and community organizations and artists in assigned counties:
    • provides technical assistance and consultative services
    • serves as a liaison and resource for agency programs
    • assists with community cultural planning, development of grant applications, budgeting, board and staff development, and program administration
  • represents the S.C. Arts Commission at local, statewide, and national cultural activities, meetings, and conferences
  • participates in strategic planning and budgeting and collaborates closely with other agency programs and departments
  • fulfills other duties consistent with supporting agency projects, programs, and events
Preferred qualifications include a bachelor's degree* in an arts discipline, arts administration, arts education, public administration, or business administration and five (5) years of professional experience in arts management and programming, community development, or related areas.

*Degree must be from an institution of higher learning recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation.

Salary and other details may be found at link below. Punctuality, regular attendance, and adherence to daily work schedule are essential.  Statewide travel, evening, and weekend work is sometimes required, as well as light lifting and long periods of sitting. The South Carolina Arts Commission is an Equal Opportunity Employer actively committed to ensuring diversity. View the complete list of requirements and job duties and find out how to apply here.

Arts Commission’s Sara June Goldstein to retire

Partnerships, literary arts maven retires March 1

After thirty-plus years of building partnerships and advancing South Carolina’s literary scene, Sara June Goldstein is to retire from the S.C. Arts Commission (SCAC). Goldstein, senior coordinator for statewide partnerships and director of literary arts, joined the agency in 1987 as project coordinator for “Carolina Connections,” a first of its kind three-day national literary festival that celebrated more than 100 writers with connections to South Carolina. She became a full-time member of the Arts Commission staff and program director for literary arts. A passionate public servant, Goldstein’s contributions to the state have all been partnerships. For 32 years, Goldstein has been advocating for the contemporary literature of South Carolina as well as building and supporting diverse partnerships that highlight poets and writers—and other artists and communities—throughout the state. To her credit are notable and innovative partnerships she helped foster or create, including:
  • Art of Community: Rural SC, an SCAC program transforming rural counties with the arts;
  • the S.C. Novel Prize (with Hub City Press, College of Charleston, S.C. State Library, and SC Humanities);
  • the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project, a partnership program among SCAC, Winthrop University, and the state department of education;
  • Leo Twiggs Arts Leadership Scholars Program with The Riley Institute at Furman;
  • Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor Commission partnership;
  • the South Carolina Literary Arts Partnership, with SC Humanities and the State Library;
  • and the South Carolina Design Arts partnership, with Clemson University School of Architecture and S.C. Downtown Development Association
Through these programs, Goldstein has developed a national network of writers, artists, scholars, and publishing professionals who are increasingly familiar with the work of South Carolina authors and have a deeper appreciation of the rich diverse culture of the state. In a fitting tribute, SC Humanities presented her with the prestigious 2018 Governor’s Award in the Humanities last October. Goldstein will leave the agency with a legacy as deep as it is broad when she heads into retirement this March 1. “Working over the decades with individuals and organizations that support and champion free and creative expression, my work at the South Carolina Arts Commission has been filled with discoveries of places and people that have enriched my life and educated my imagination,” Goldstein said. “Sara June has done as much for the literary arts in South Carolina as anyone I know, to say nothing of the way she brought so many partners to the table to work together and benefit the citizens of South Carolina,” SCAC Executive Director Ken May said. “We’re sad to see her go and will miss her, but our state will continue to feel the impact of her work.” The S.C. Arts Commission is announcing that it is accepting applications for a community arts coordinator position resulting from the opening on its team. Interested applicants may learn more about the position from the official posting.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

We’re losing our Joy

Joy Young on to bigger, better things in Sunshine State

The S.C. Arts Commission is in a somber mood today because it marks the last day in the office for Joy Young after 14 years of service here. [caption id="attachment_38810" align="alignright" width="200"] Joy Young[/caption] In addition to serving South Carolinians in Cherokee, Georgetown, Greenville, Horry, and Spartanburg counties as an SCAC county coordinator, she worked diligently to build the ArtsGrowSC and Artists' Ventures Initiatives programs to help arts entrepreneurs in the state find resources to help them build stable, sustainable careers in the arts. She also directed leadership and organizational development and presenting and performing arts programs among and, closer to home, directed our agency human resources. In an email to staff last month announcing her departure, Executive Director Ken May said, "In February she will begin her tenure as executive director of the Cultural Council of Greater Jacksonville in Florida. Joy has been an outstanding team member at the Arts Commission, where she has served in many roles during her time here, including director of administration and human resource. Of course we hate to lose a great staff leader like Joy, but we are very proud and supportive of her as she pursues this wonderful new opportunity. And something tells me that we will continue to have strong ties, even if she is a couple of states away." Joy's smile and infectious enthusiasm leaves a big hole in our hearts, but our staff is excited for this fantastic career opportunity for someone who's earned every last bit of it. Congratulations and best wishes, Joy!

Develop young minds using the arts (and get a grant to do it)

Serve tomorrow today with an AEP grant from the SCAC

Application deadline extended: Friday, Feb. 15, 2019 (for FY20) The deadline for Arts Education Projects (AEP) grant has been extended to Friday, February 15, 2019. AEP grants fund projects and programs that use the arts to meet the educational, developmental, and social needs of South Carolina's K-12 students, whether in-school or otherwise. That's right: these grants are for schools (public or private), community groups, government agencies, faith organizations, and ... well, anybody. The only stipulation is that you have to be using the arts to develop young minds.

So, what does that look like?

Here are two examples of current AEP grantees:
  • The famed Gaillard Center in Charleston received $10,500 for teacher professional development in the arts.
  • The Sue-Ham Community Development Center in Williamsburg County received $8,900 to help underwrite a community theatre production and some associated workshops.
Two groups. One urban, one rural. One large, one small. One doing teacher training, one putting on a show. They encapsulate the best thing about an AEP grant: no matter who you are or where you are, you have access to grant money to using the arts as you impact the next generation. This year's largest grant was $13,500 and the smallest was about $3,500. You can use an AEP grant to cover half of your project's expenses. A panel of arts professionals will review all applications and recommend funding to our board of commissioners. To learn more, visit the grant guidelines.