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Tuning Up: Cheers to the ArtFields winners

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


  • Lake City's ArtFields wrapped this past weekend and announced its competition winners. Top prize winner Michaela Pilar Brown also happens to be the recipient of an Artist Ventures Initiative grant from SCAC. Colin Quashie and Julie Hanger picked up coveted People's Choice awards. Tom Stanley, who (you might have heard...) will be presented a Verner Award for the Arts tomorrow, was a merit award winner. The Arts Commission sends hearty and sincere congratulations to all winners.
  • SCAC Executive Director Ken May recently joined Mike Switzer on S.C. Public Radio to talk about the impact of the arts and creative industries on the state economy.
 

Janae Claxton is Poetry Out Loud national champ

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 26 April 2018

  • Janae Claxton of First Baptist Church School in Charleston wins in Washington
  • State’s first back-to-back champ adds national honors, $20,000 prize
WASHINGTON – Last night in Washington, a Charleston student became the first South Carolinian to win the national finals of the Poetry Out Loud recitation competition and its $20,000 prize. [caption id="attachment_34999" align="alignright" width="250"] SCAC Executive Director Ken May and Janae Claxton celebrate her national championship after the competition. Credit James Kegley/NEA.[/caption] Janae Claxton, a senior at First Baptist Church School, made history already this year in March by becoming the state’s first back-to-back Poetry Out Loud state competition winner. On Tuesday, she added another first to her résumé as the first South Carolina student to advance out of round one of the national finals. By Wednesday night, she was winding down her high school experience as the competition’s national champion. She’ll bring the honor – and its $20,000 prize – back to the Palmetto State, which has offered the Poetry Out Loud competition since she was in first grade. Claxton recited “The Gaffe” by C.K. Williams and “A Satirical Elegy on the Death of a Late Famous General” by Jonathan Swift before clinching the top score from the judges with Sharon Olds’ “I Go Back to May 1937.” “[Poetry Out Loud] really does change your life. It really does have that power. For me, it changed my identity, made me see myself differently [and realize] I’m smart, I’m intelligent, I can do this,” Claxton said. “We are so proud of Janae and her historic win—our first national finalist and first national champion. She was absolutely amazing! We are also proud of South Carolina’s Poetry Out Loud program, which involves 7,500 students from 35 schools in 14 counties. We hope that this exciting win will encourage even greater statewide participation,” South Carolina Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said. Nicholas Amador of Hawaii was first runner-up and Hope Stratman of Nebraska was second runner-up. Photos and videos of the nine finalists who competed in the April 25 finals are available here. Students and schools received $50,000 in awards and school stipends at the National Finals, including $20,000 for the Poetry Out Loud National Champion, and $10,000 and $5,000 for the second- and third-place finalists. The fourth- to ninth-place finalists each received $1,000. The schools of the top nine finalists received $500 for the purchase of poetry books. Poetry Out Loud is a national initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with the Poetry Foundation and the state arts agencies. Its national finals took place at George Washington University Lisner Auditorium in Washington. The event host was poet and author Elizabeth Acevedo. Guest judges included Robert Casper, head of the Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress; Lavina Jadhwani, Chicago-based theater director; Robin Coste Lewis, poet and National Book Award winner; Dawn Lundy Martin, poet and professor at the University of Pittsburgh; and Virgil Suárez, poet and professor of at Florida State University. The featured performer was musician Kaia Kater.
JANAE CLAXTON, 2018 POETRY OUT LOUD NATIONAL CHAMPION “[Poetry Out Loud] really does change your life. It really does have that power. For me, it changed my identity, made me see myself differently [and realize] I’m smart, I’m intelligent, I can do this.” KEN MAY, SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISION EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR “We are so proud of Janae and her historic win—our first national finalist and first national champion. She was absolutely amazing! We are also proud of South Carolina’s Poetry Out Loud program, which involves 7,500 students from 35 schools in 14 counties. We hope that this exciting win will encourage even greater statewide participation.” ROBIN GRAMLING, FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEACHER “When you enter the world of poetry, dream big!! Janae Claxton showed us last night a grace and elegance that was transcendent. When she spoke, the hush in the room was palpable. Janae proved the truth of the poet. A word is indeed not dead when it is said ...but begins to live in unimaginable ways. Thank you Poetry Out Loud for helping resurrect the world with words!” ZURI WILSON-SEYMORE, SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISION POETRY OUR LOUD PROGRAM COORDINATOR “I'm overjoyed with excitement for Janae Claxton and this historic moment for poetry in South Carolina.”
ABOUT POETRY OUT LOUD Poetry Out Loud encourages students to learn about great poetry through memorization and recitation. This program helps students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence, and learn about literary history and contemporary life. Since 2005, Poetry Out Loud has grown to reach more than 3 million students and 50,000 teachers from 10,000 schools in every state, Washington, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. For information, visit PoetryOutLoud.org. For information about Poetry Out Loud in South Carolina, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com.   ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISSION The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.   ABOUT THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE ARTS The National Endowment for the Arts was established by Congress in 1965 as an independent agency of the federal government. To date, the NEA has awarded more than $5 billion to support artistic excellence, creativity, and innovation for the benefit of individuals and communities. The NEA extends its work through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector. Visit Arts.gov for additional information.   ABOUT THE POETRY FOUNDATION The Poetry Foundation, publisher of Poetry magazine, is an independent literary organization committed to a vigorous presence for poetry in our culture. It has embarked on an ambitious plan to bring the best poetry before the largest possible audiences. Visit PoetryFoundation.org for more information.

VIDEO: Woodward and May on economic impact study

Thursday afternoon,  MidlandsBiz.com released their coverage of the new economic impact study. It included publisher Alan Cooper's interviews with Dr. Doug Woodward, the researcher and economist who completed the new economic impact study, and Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May. Take a look!  

Arts Sector Makes $9.7 Billion Impact on S.C. Economy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 6 February 2018   COLUMBIA, S.C. – The jobs, tax revenue, and spending by South Carolina’s arts-related sector add $9.7 billion to the state’s economy, according to a new economic impact study released today by the S.C. Arts Commission. Additional findings in “South Carolina’s Arts-Related Economic Cluster” include that the arts:

  • support 115,000 jobs,
  • are responsible for $3.8 billion in labor income,
  • and generate $269 million in tax revenue.
According to the study, the arts form a cluster like other large sectors of the state’s economy. Along with manufacturing and agriculture, “the arts-related cluster is a linchpin of state and local economic development.” It goes on to conclude that, “from any perspective, these are considerable economic benefits.” The study was authored by Douglas P. Woodward, Ph.D. Woodward examined 2014 data from the U.S. census and economic analysis bureaus and commerce department to complete the report, analyzing the S.C. economy associated with the arts, design, crafts, and related activities. He is the director of the Division of Research and professor of economics at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. “It’s certainly appropriate for state leaders to pay attention to the arts as a viable economic driver just as they do agriculture, manufacturing, and other key sectors,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said. “This report gives context to the work by artists and arts organizations all over the state and connects those efforts to S.C.’s creative economy.” The study utilized an economic multiplier model to determine the extent of the arts-related cluster’s impact. Researchers first analyzed the number of direct jobs in the sector and then assessed its economic impact using a model of South Carolina’s economic linkages – how spending in one sector spreads. Music and arts organizations, for example, hire workers who spend money in the local economy, leading to a ripple-effect of further income and spending through various other sectors. The concept of an economic multiplier is an accepted and widely practiced technique used to assess the total impact of regional business activities. For context, a recent study on the USC statewide system reported a $5.5 billion impact. Leading sectors in the state include agribusiness at $41 billion, automotive at $27 billion, and tourism at $20 billion. The complete study is available from the Arts Commission website at: http://www.southcarolinaarts.com/economic/artsclusterreport
  ABOUT DR. DOUGLAS P. WOODWARD Dr. Douglas P. Woodward is the director of the Division of Research and professor of economics at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. He earned his Ph.D. in economics at the University of Texas in 1986. Dr. Woodward's primary research interests are in regional economic development. He has published numerous academic articles in economics and regional science journals. Dr. Woodward has conducted sponsored economic research in the United States, China, Morocco, South Africa, Kenya and elsewhere. Over his career, Dr. Woodward has received many grants and awards. He has testified before local, state and national government committees and has presented his research at many conferences around the world, including the prestigious World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzer- land. Dr. Woodward has been quoted frequently in the national press and has often appeared on television and radio programs discussing economic development and related topics.
ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISSION The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.

Arts Commission to release economic impact report next week

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 31 January 2018

  • Economist, researcher Doug Woodward to present report at legislative luncheon
  • Statewide arts advocates to gather at State House in support of sector
COLUMBIA, S.C. – With Arts Advocacy Day at the State House in Columbia as a backdrop, the S.C. Arts Commission will release a new economic impact report on South Carolina’s arts sector Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018. The new report, the first since 2010, will show the arts’ impact on the S.C. economy with detailed employment and total impact numbers, among other things. It was commissioned by the Arts Commission and completed by Doug Woodward, Ph.D., an economist, researcher, and professor at the USC Darla Moore School of Business who examined 2014 data from the Federal Bureau of Economic Analysis. As the keynote speaker at the 1 p.m. legislative luncheon at the Capital City Club (1201 Main St., 25th floor, Columbia), Woodward will give a presentation on his findings and be available for media questions. “We expect the report will show that the state’s investment in the arts translates to a significant impact on the state’s economy, from jobs created and maintained to the ripple effects of people then transferring wages to other sectors through spending,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said. “It’s certainly appropriate for state leaders to pay attention to the arts as a viable economic driver just as they do agriculture, manufacturing, and other key sectors.” Arts Advocacy Day is organized and presented annually by the S.C. Arts Alliance. Festivities begin shortly after 11 a.m. on the State House steps as 300 choral students from Richland School District 2 in Columbia sing on the building’s Gervais Street steps. Arts advocates then move inside for a rally, enthusiastically greeting members of the House and Senate arriving for the day’s sessions, before moving across Gervais Street for the 1 p.m. luncheon honoring the S.C. Legislative Arts Caucus.
ABOUT DR. DOUGLAS P. WOODWARD Dr. Douglas P. Woodward is the director of the Division of Research and professor of economics at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. He earned his Ph.D. in economics at the University of Texas in 1986. Dr. Woodward's primary research interests are in regional economic development. He has published numerous academic articles in economics and regional science journals. Dr. Woodward has conducted sponsored economic research in the United States, China, Morocco, South Africa, Kenya and elsewhere. Over his career, Dr. Woodward has received many grants and awards. He has testified before local, state and national government committees and has presented his research at many conferences around the world, including the prestigious World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzer- land. Dr. Woodward has been quoted frequently in the national press and has often appeared on television and radio programs discussing economic development and related topics.
ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS ALLIANCE The South Carolina Arts Alliance is dedicated to advancing the arts for all South Carolinians through advocacy, leadership development, and public awareness. Based at the Younts Center for Performing Arts in Fountain Inn, S.C., the SCAA works across the state with artists, arts administrators, educators, creative entrepreneurs, community leaders, and arts supporters to strengthen the creative sector in South Carolina. More information can be found at SCArtsAlliance.net.
ABOUT THE SOUTH CAROLINA ARTS COMMISSION The South Carolina Arts Commission is the state agency charged with creating a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their location or circumstances. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.

Arts Commission executive director elected to national grantmakers board

Ken MaySouth Carolina Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May has been elected to the Grantmakers in the Arts board of directors. He will serve a three-year term beginning January 2017. Grantmakers in the Arts (GIA) is the only national association of both public and private arts and culture funders in the U.S., including independent and family foundations, public agencies, community foundations, corporate philanthropies, nonprofit regrantors, and national service organizations – funders of all shapes and sizes across the U.S. and into Canada. GIA provides leadership and service that advances the use of philanthropic and governmental resources to support the growth of the arts and culture. With offices in Seattle, GIA sponsors an annual conference; research and publications on arts philanthropy, including The Reader periodical; and a robust website with a library of studies and articles. The organization hosts regional and local workshops on issues such as capitalization of the nonprofit arts sector, artists working in community settings, arts and medicine, and the environment. GIA is a leading proponent for racial equity in arts philanthropy and policy changes at the federal level in arts education, arts and aging and juvenile justice. May joined the S.C. Arts Commission in 1985 and was named executive director in 2010. He has played a key role in the creation of many of the agency’s nationally recognized programs and partnerships in arts education, community design, public participation in the arts, rural arts development, and career development for artists. May has served as a panelist and site-visitor for the National Endowment for the Arts; a panelist, presenter, consultant, and facilitator for national, state, and local arts organizations; and a guest lecturer in arts administration programs at the College of Charleston and Winthrop University. He is a member of the board of the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies, South Arts, and South Carolina Afterschool Alliance, and is an alumnus fellow of the Diversity Leaders Initiative of the Riley Institute at Furman University. May has worked previously as a professional musician. He received undergraduate and master’s degrees in music history and musicology from Florida State University. Others elected to the GIA board of directors are: Jaime Dempsey, deputy director of Arizona Commission on the Arts; and Sharnita Johnson, arts program director of The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation. Re-elected to a second term are Denise Brown, executive director of Leeway Foundation; Kerry McCarthy, program director – thriving communities at The New York Community Trust; and Angelique Power, president of The Field Foundation of Illinois. Beginning in 2017, Power will assume a two-year term as chair of GIA, while McCarthy will serve as vice chair. Via: Grantmakers in the Arts

A look ahead at the arts in 2016 in SC

Arts Commission director talks issues in coming year From The State Article by Erin Shaw

Ken MayKen May, the executive director of the South Carolina Arts Commission, is dedicated to building a thriving arts environment for the benefit of all South Carolinians. The organization focuses mainly on artist development, arts education and community arts development. Here, May discusses what he expects to happen with the arts in South Carolina in the upcoming year. “I think 2016 is going to be an interesting, busy year,” he said. “There are several things that have been put into motion over the last several years that I think are going to have an impact.” POSITIVES: I’ve never before seen the broad recognition of the importance of arts education that I see now. I think everybody realizes this is an issue that we need to make progress on. It’s a good time for education and a good time for arts education. Arts education has always been a big issue for us. Our mission is to make it possible for all citizens to benefit from the arts. ON TASK: Last year we put together an arts education task force to assess the progress we’ve made so far and to identify next steps. One of the things we found – which was not surprising, but still sobering – was that quality arts education is happening in places with supplemental funding. Students in high poverty schools are therefore much less likely to have access to the arts. We really need to find new approaches to reach those high poverty areas. Last year, we requested and got $1 million from the Legislature specifically for arts education. We’re using that to really get going on the recommendations from the task force. ABBEVILLE LAWSUIT: The state Supreme Court decided the Abbeville school equity lawsuit (Abbeville County School District v. State of South Carolina) a year ago and ruled that the state had failed to provide a minimally adequate education for students in the state’s poor, rural districts. The House Education Task Force built into its recommendation a piece that relates to arts education. It includes more school day arts offerings and supporting after-school and summer programs that would be arts-related. It’s really exciting that they did that, and it will make 2016’s legislative session interesting to watch to see what actually gets done. MORE CULTURAL DISTRICTS: We’re seeing the rise of cultural districts in towns and cities across the state. There’s really a growing recognition among civic leaders that the arts are powerful drivers in revitalizing urban neighborhoods. What’s happened in the Vista and downtown Greenville are examples. A couple years ago, we got authority to officially designate cultural districts. We rolled out the program last year and to date we have five designations, with several more in the queue. And I think we’ll see that as a continuing trend. TRANSITIONS: Many arts leaders are nearing retirement, so we will be seeing leaders leaving their posts and seeking new ones to take their place. For example, Betty Plumb, the executive director of the South Carolina Arts Alliance and a key player in arts advocacy for the last 27 years, will be stepping down next fall. As for new hires, the Arts Commission is getting a new staff member to focus on arts education. We haven’t had any staffing in that area since 2010. We also jointly hired a new coordinator for folk and traditional arts with McKissick Museum. So, we’re excited about those incoming transitions. WISH LIST: By this time in 2016, it would be exciting if the Legislature took the first steps on the recommendations in the Abbeville case and if we were in the mix helping get started on those solutions. I would like to see several more cities with cultural districts and have us working with those cities collaboratively. I would like to see artists working together in small clusters at the community level to really begin to tackle their careers and figure out their strategies. And I hope to see our new staffers on board and doing great new stuff.

S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May elected to national board

The National Assembly of State Arts Agencies (NASAA) has announced that Ken May, executive director of the South Carolina Arts Commission, has been elected to its board of directors. May is one of five new members; each will serve a three-year term. The election took place Nov. 15 at the NASAA Assembly 2014 conference in New Orleans after a rigorous national nomination process. Ken MayMay joined the South Carolina Arts Commission in 1985 as a regional arts coordinator and served as director of planning, research and grants and assistant deputy director before being named deputy director in 1995. During his tenure at the Commission, May has played a key role in the creation of many of the agency's nationally recognized programs and partnerships in arts education, community design, public participation in the arts, rural arts development, and career development for artists. Since becoming executive director in 2010, he has gained a national reputation as a leader in the use of social media for arts advocacy, decisively overcoming serious threats to his agency during the 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013 legislative sessions and securing $1 million in new recurring state appropriation for arts grants in 2013. May has served as a panelist and site visitor for the National Endowment for the Arts; a panelist, presenter, consultant and facilitator for national, state and local arts organizations; and a guest lecturer in arts administration programs at the College of Charleston and Winthrop University. He is a member of the board and current treasurer of South Arts. Before beginning his career in arts administration, May held positions with ARA Services Magazine and Book Division and McGraw-Hill. Prior to his long sojourn in the realm of day jobs, he worked as a professional musician. He received undergraduate and master's degrees in music history and musicology from Florida State University. Other new board members are Cyndy Andrus, chair, Montana Arts Council; Stephanie Barger Conner, board member, Tennesseans for the Arts; Nola Ruth, chair, Missouri Arts Council; and Suzanne Wise, executive director, Nebraska Arts Council. Three board members were elected to second terms: Benjamin Brown, chair, Alaska State Council on the Arts; Lewis Ricci, executive director, Indiana Arts Commission; and Randall Rosenbaum, executive director, Rhode Island State Council on the Arts. "We are pleased to welcome Cyndy, Stephanie, Ken, Nola and Suzanne to the NASAA board, and are delighted that Ben, Lewis and Randy will continue their service," said NASAA Interim Chief Executive Officer Kelly Barsdate. "They all are skilled leaders with keen policy acumen and a genuine passion for the arts. We are excited to work with this new team and we welcome their expertise and guidance." For more information on NASAA's board members, visit NASAA 2015 Board of Directors. About the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies The National Assembly of State Arts Agencies is the membership organization that unites, represents and serves the nation's state and jurisdictional arts agencies. Founded in 1968, NASAA represents their individual and collective interests, empowers their work through knowledge, and advances the arts as an essential public benefit. To learn more about NASAA and state arts agencies, visit www.nasaa-arts.org.

Milly

What is The Hub?

The South Carolina Arts Commission has launched The Hub to promote all that is special about the arts in the state. The Hub features arts news and opportunities, resources, calls for art, research, events and more. Join us on The Hub by submitting news and story ideas for consideration, commenting on posts and sharing Hub posts via social media.

“The Hub is a one-stop shop where readers can find real-time news, events and resources they need to participate in and learn about the arts in South Carolina. We want to help residents and visitors find arts activities, direct artists and arts organizations to opportunities, and let our citizens know they can be proud of our state’s contributions to the arts. In fact, we want the world beyond our state’s borders to know that South Carolina is a place where the arts can and do thrive.” - Ken May, Executive Director, S.C. Arts Commission

One Hub feature, "Experience the Arts in SC," offers a Google map of the state with arts venue locations, making it easy for readers to find places to enjoy the arts. The Hub does not replace the Arts Commission’s current website, rather it serves as a portal to the main website, to the agency’s Arts Daily calendar and to websites of other organizations. Hub posts are a mix of original content, news gathered from other sources and items submitted by readers. We're happy to see you on the Hub and hope you'll stop by often! A screenshot of The Hub home page