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Jason Rapp

Arts Education Partnership report lauds ABC Project in S.C.

AEP report 'reflects back and projects forward'


Over 25 years ago, the U.S. Department of Education and the National Endowment for the Arts partnered with the National Assembly of State Arts Agencies and Council of Chief State School Officers to create the Arts Education Partnership (AEP) to ensure that all students have equitable access to an excellent arts education.​ - AEP report


A new report from AEP takes a long look at the genesis of the partnership. While it's no surprise to those involved in the work, casual readers might be surprised to know that South Carolina and a few South Carolinians at the right place at the right time figured mightily in how everything came together on a national level. In a Part 2 of the report, former SCAC Executive Director Scott Shanklin-Peterson and Dr. Terry Peterson recount work with Dick Riley in Columbia as governor and Washington as President Clinton's education secretary to get the arts included in sweeping educational reforms in the 1980s and 1990s. The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is extremely proud of the ongoing work of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, a national model for integrating the arts into K-12 curriculum discussed at length in the AEP report. Together with the South Carolina Dept. of Education and the Winthrop University College of Visual and Performing Arts, the ABC Project continues serving the Palmetto State 31 years after starting and 33 years after the SCAC received a $20,000 Arts in Schools Basic Education planning grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to develop the it. Read the full report here.

ABC Project names new executive director

Dr. Kim Wilson promoted to lead Arts in Basic Curriculum Project

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 27 March 2019
COLUMBIA, S.C. – The Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project is announcing the promotion of Dr. Kim Wilson to be the program’s new executive director as of April 1, 2019. Wilson will be responsible for helping 84 schools or districts provide 170,000 South Carolina K-12 students with access to arts-rich education. The program, which is a partnership among the South Carolina Arts Commission, Winthrop University, and the S.C. Dept. of Education, provides critical training and networking for arts teachers who learn best practices from each other. Schools or districts join the program after receiving a grant from the S.C. Arts Commission to support their arts education efforts. The program’s field services coordinator for 18 months, Wilson is a Winthrop University alumna. She earned her doctorate in education this year from Walden University. Her experience in arts education began in community education teaching adult and children’s classes through the University of Vermont and Very Special Arts VT. Afterwards, she served as education director at Pewabic Pottery in Detroit and executive director for Sawtooth School for Visual Arts in Winston-Salem, N.C. Over the last 10 years, Kim has focused on public arts education. After only teaching four years, she was recognized as the 2012 Arkansas Teacher of the Year. Since then, she transitioned into empowering all educators with creativity-fostering teaching practices, including arts-integration strategies through her work with Arkansas A+ Schools. She replaces Christine Fisher, who served as executive director for 18 years and announced her retirement earlier this month. “My commitment to and passion for arts education have been influenced by ABC Project’s accomplishments and the people who contributed to its history. And while my personal arts education journey has taken many forms across several states over the last three decades, all have prepared me for this unique role in my home state. I am honored and eager for the opportunity to lead ABC Project in the next chapter of its rich history,” Wilson said. “In Kim Wilson, the ABC Project has someone with demonstrated success fostering and implementing arts education. In a relatively short time, she’s immersed herself in all facets of the program and contributed to its success. But beyond that, she has incredible passion for what she does and is a natural fit to be the ABC Project’s next leader,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said.

About the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project

For 30 years, the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project provides leadership to achieve quality, comprehensive arts education (dance, music, media arts, theatre, visual arts and creative writing) for all students in South Carolina. It is cooperatively directed by the South Carolina Arts Commission, the South Carolina Department of Education and the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Winthrop University. For more information, visit ABCProjectSC.com.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

Arts education leader Christine Fisher announces retirement

Fisher led Arts in Basic Curriculum Project for 18 years


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 13 March 2019 [caption id="attachment_39351" align="alignright" width="225"]Christine Fisher Christine Fisher[/caption] COLUMBIA, S.C. – Christine Fisher is to retire from the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project this month after spending nearly 20 years working to provide comprehensive arts programs in schools across the state. Fisher, who lives in Florence, began her career in arts education in the classroom, teaching chorus, guitar and musical production at Dillon High School and then elementary general music, beginning band and middle school band in Florence School District One through 2001. She left that year to become executive director of the ABC Project, a partnership among the S.C. Arts Commission, Winthrop University, and S.C. Department of Education that works with schools and districts across the state to maintain and expand arts opportunities for all students. It is based at Winthrop in Rock Hill. Under Fisher’s leadership, the program grew to serve 84 schools or districts and 171,000 students this school year and played an important role in making sure the arts were included in the landmark Profile of the South Carolina Graduate in 2015, a rigorous set of standards for college and career readiness adopted by the state General Assembly in 2016. “Christine Fisher has spent her entire career being a tireless advocate and supporter of arts based education in South Carolina. I am so appreciative of Christine’s leadership from being the only music teacher to be named our state teacher of the year to her service as the director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project where she has brought access to the arts to students across our state and shared her tremendous wealth of knowledge with countless educators. I along with South Carolina’s arts community will miss her dearly,” S.C. Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman said. Many highlights dot the timeline of Fisher’s career. She was twice selected as a school and district Teacher of the Year, and twice selected as one of the five South Carolina honor roll teachers. Selected as the South Carolina Teacher of the Year in 1998, she is the only music teacher to hold the honor in the program's history. The S.C. Arts Commission awarded her state’s highest arts award, the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts, in 2006, and she received the Winthrop University Medal of Arts in 2012. “She has changed many thousands of young lives for the better. They, and we, owe her heartfelt thanks and praise for her life of unselfish, tireless devotion to arts education for everyone. We wish her nothing but the best in her retirement—and more time for music-making,” S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May said.

Full Statements on Christine Fisher's retirement

MOLLY SPEARMAN S.C. Superintendent of Education

“Christine Fisher has spent her entire career being a tireless advocate and supporter of arts based education in South Carolina. I am so appreciative of Christine’s leadership from being the only music teacher to be named our state teacher of the year to her service as the director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project where she has brought access to the arts to students across our state and shared her tremendous wealth of knowledge with countless educators. I along with South Carolina’s arts community will miss her dearly.”

KEN MAY Executive Director, S.C. Arts Commission

“The first time I ever heard Christine Fisher speak, she told the moving and powerful story of how the arts, specifically music, saved her life. As I reflect now on her retirement, I realize that all of her work, her entire amazing career, has been about paying forward—at increasing orders of magnitude—the wonderful, transformative gift that she was given. From her early days teaching in Dillon and Florence, to her ground-breaking tenure as State Teacher of the Year, to her long, outstanding service as Executive Director of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, she has changed many thousands of young lives for the better. They, and we, owe her heartfelt thanks and praise for her life of unselfish, tireless devotion to arts education for everyone. We wish her nothing but the best in her retirement—and more time for music-making!”

JEFF BELLANTONI Dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts, Winthrop University

“Christine has been an integral part of the arts community at Winthrop University for 18 years. We had the pleasure of recognizing the impact she has made in 2012 when she was awarded our Medal of Honor in the Arts. Her passion and commitment to integrating the arts into education throughout the state is unmatched. Christine’s steadfast support of the arts is evident through her many years of service as an educator and arts advocate, and she will be missed.”


About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

S.C. Arts Awards: Tom Stanley

2018 Recipient Feature Series

As the day nears for the 2018 South Carolina Arts Awards, The Hub is taking 10 days to focus on this year's 10 recipients: five receiving the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts and five receiving the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award, which are managed jointly by the South Carolina Arts Commission and McKissick Museum at USC. This week, the Verner Awards recipients are featured.
[caption id="attachment_34771" align="alignright" width="205"] Photo by Terry Roueche[/caption]

Tom Stanley

Artist Category Visual artist Tom Stanley, former chair of the Winthrop University Department of Fine Arts, earned a master’s in applied art history and another in painting from the University of South Carolina in 1980. There he learned what it meant to support, trust, and encourage students. After time on college faculties in Arkansas and Florida throughout the 1980s, in 1990 he returned to South Carolina to become the first director of Winthrop University Galleries and became chair of the school’s fine arts department in 2007. During his tenure as chair and gallery director, he worked to increase student and department visibility. He fostered gallery programming partnerships in both Carolinas including the exhibition Still Worth Keeping: Communities, Preservation and Self-Taught Artists with the South Carolina State Museum highlighting the importance of these artists to community identity. Stanley and former Winthrop colleague Shaun Cassidy, a sculptor, worked closely with Winthrop, the Wells Fargo Championship, the City of Rock Hill, and Family Trust Federal Credit Union to create ongoing opportunities for students to be commissioned in the production of public art in the region. Stanley also developed an initiative called ACE (Artists and Civic Engagement). It hosted regional artists including Leo Twiggs and Minuette Floyd and brought artist Patrick Dougherty to Rock Hill to create a temporary sapling sculpture titled Ain’t Misbehavin’ on Main Street with the assistance of fine arts students. In recent years Stanley’s creative work has been exhibited in Charleston, Greenville, and Columbia in South Carolina; Charlotte, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem in North Carolina; in New Orleans; and internationally in Berlin, Lausanne, Paris, and Portugal. His most recent exhibition was Tom Stanley: Scratching the Surface at the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art during Spoleto in Charleston. Last year, Stanley completed the public art commission for CATS’ Tom Hunter light rail station in Charlotte, which includes 15 windscreen panels, two benches, seven column claddings, and 32 steel fence inserts. Stanley and Cassidy teamed for public art commissions in Simpsonville, Raleigh, and in Omaha, Neb. In 2010, they completed the 33-ft. high stainless-steel Winthrop Monolith and in 2015 produced the commission Moments on Main Street in Columbia. For more, visit TomStanleyArt.com.
South Carolina Arts Awards Day is Wednesday, May 2, 2018. Gov. Henry McMaster will present each recipient's award beginning at 10:30 a.m. in the State House. The event is open to the public. Following the ceremony, the South Carolina Arts Foundation honors the recipients and the arts community at the S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon and Art Sale. Tickets are $50. Please go here for more information and reservations.

Winthrop University names new dean for the College of Visual and Performing Arts

Winthrop University has hired Jeff Bellantoni, former vice president for academic affairs at Ringling College of Art and Design, as the new dean for the College of Visual and Performing Arts. Winthrop officials said Bellantoni possesses a successful record of leadership, development and administration of design, art, and liberal arts programs at multiple institutions. He will join the Winthrop University community on July 1. Debra Boyd, provost and executive vice president for academic affairs, noted that Bellantoni’s strategic leadership and administrative experience, his focus on creating supportive environments for students and faculty, and his successful entrepreneurial endeavors made him the right candidate for the deanship. “He impressed the campus and community members with his passion for and dedication to the arts as critical to the human experience, and I am certain that he will apply that passion, dedication, and skill to the arts at Winthrop,” she said. With a career spanning more than 25 years as an arts educator, designer, and author, Bellantoni most recently served as vice president for academic affairs at Ringling College of Art and Design in Sarasota, Florida. As the chief academic officer of the college, he held responsibility for all the academic affairs of the institution including academic departments and programs, as well as collaborative enterprises, communications and marketing, and continuing studies and lifelong learning. He led several key initiatives, including developing degree programs in creative writing and visual studies, helping secure a $3 million donation for a new Visual Arts Center, overseeing successful accreditation visits and creating a student innovation fund. Bellantoni said it is an honor to be the next dean of the College of Visual and Performing Arts. “I look forward to working closely with its accomplished and dedicated faculty, shaping the next generation of creative leaders and promoting the arts as critical to our cultural and economic prosperity,” he said. “Winthrop’s reputation for providing an educational experience that blends liberal arts, professional programs, and civic engagement attracted me to this opportunity. I look forward to collaborating both across the university and regionally to establish new and exciting cross-disciplinary initiatives.” From 2008-14, Bellantoni was chair of the nationally ranked Graduate Communications Design Department at Pratt Institute in New York, where he established the MFA program, Pratt Press, and the Graduate Design Guild. He has held faculty and administrative positions at the University of Connecticut, New York-based Mercy College, VCU School of the Arts, and the Wanganui School of Design in New Zealand. He earned an MFA in visual communications from Virginia Commonwealth University and a BFA from the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Bellantoni is co-author and designer of several internationally published titles on Typography and Media – including the best-selling titles Type in Motion and Moving Type, Designing for Time and Space – and he has written on graphic design for How magazine and various other design publications. His design work has been recognized by Print magazine, the AIGA (50 Books/50 Covers), and Connecticut Art Director’s Club; and he presented at conferences, events and educational institutions around the world. He will be moving to the area with his wife, the ceramist Kim Westad. The College of Visual and Performing Arts is the academic home to more than 650 undergraduate students majoring in 12 areas and more than 50 graduate students in its six master’s programs and one post-baccalaureate certificate program. The college has a total of 105 faculty members, of whom 52 are full time and 53 are part-time lecturers who are practicing professionals from the surrounding metropolitan area. Winthrop’s programs of dance, fine arts, interior design, music and theatre are nationally accredited. In addition, Winthrop’s arts education programs (art, music, theatre and dance) are accredited through the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education.

ABC Project website gets a makeover

ABC-Logo-r2The Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project website (ABCProjectSC.com) has been transformed with a new design and streamlined content and will now serve as a digital hub for arts education in South Carolina. The new site includes an arts education calendar, a news portal, and resources for current and future ABC sites – schools and districts that receive ABC Advancement grants from the South Carolina Arts Commission. The website also features a directory of all ABC sites that can be sorted by county, district, or grade level. “Schools and districts become ABC sites by going through a rigorous arts strategic planning process to implement standards-based arts curriculum and integrate the arts into daily classroom instruction,” said ABC Project Director Christine Fisher. “The new website will support the work of arts educators and make it easier for parents, business leaders and community members to learn about arts education and ABC sites in their communities.” S.C. Arts Commission Arts Education Director Ashley Brown says the new website will also enhance the ABC Project’s national profile. “South Carolina moved to the frontlines of the national arts education movement by launching the ABC Project in 1987,” says Brown. “We’ve made great strides in 30 years, and now we are focused on the next level of arts education reform. Our goal is to activate the arts to ensure all students gain the vital skills needed for the 21st century, including critical thinking, creativity, and communication. This website will support that goal with quality arts lesson plans, a blog featuring national arts education experts, grants and resources, and professional development videos for educators. The site will serve as a national model for the intersection of arts and technology.” The Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project provides leadership to achieve quality, comprehensive arts education (which includes creative writing, dance, design, media arts, music, theatre, and visual arts) for all students in South Carolina. The ABC Project is cooperatively directed by the South Carolina Arts Commission, the South Carolina Department of Education and the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Winthrop University. For more information about the ABC Project, visit www.ABCProjectSC.com. For more information about S.C. Arts Commission programs and services, visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.  

Remembering Winthrop University professor and artist Paul Martyka

Winthrop University Fine Arts Associate Professor Paul Martyka passed away Wednesday, Jan. 27. Martyka was an award-winning artist and faculty member whose service at the university spanned nearly 40 years. Three of Martyka's works are in the South Carolina Arts Commission's State Art Collection. Pictured above, left to right:

  • Second Set VII: Hope and the Reddened Core, 1992, acrylic on canvas, 65" x 48.5"
  • Second Set: Beyond the Triple Cross: Redux, 1992, acrylic on canvas, 66" x 49.5"
From Winthrop University
PaulMarytkaLong-time Winthrop University Fine Arts Associate Professor Paul Martyka passed away unexpectedly on Wednesday, Jan. 27. The Detroit, Michigan, native taught drawing, painting and printmaking in the Department of Fine Arts. Funeral arrangements have not been completed. At a prayer vigil held Tuesday night at Rutledge Building in the printmaking studio, students and friends came together for a powerful display of love for their professor. As Martyka spent his last hours in intensive care, his students recalled a man who ordered his life so that nothing was wasted, always put the students’ interests first and displayed a quiet compassion and concern for their well-being. One of his favorite sayings was: “Now, get to work.” His admirers said Martyka had a knack for taking materials, redefining them as sculpture and changing their meaning. His printmaking abilities were equally gifted and were laden with icons and symbolism. “Paul Martyka brought an unusual perspective to our art students,” said Tom Stanley, department chair. “They regarded him fondly and with respect because of his influence and generosity as he urged others to become passionate about their work. As alum Joey Hays pointed out, ‘He was such an amazing artist, teacher, mentor, and friend.’   Paul was all about his students.” Chad Dresbach, chair of the Department of Design, said Martyka was a major factor in his decision to work at Winthrop. “His loss will be felt profoundly, and the gleam of the institution is slightly dimmed by this loss,” Dresbach said. “A great man will be missed.” Before coming to Winthrop in 1979, Martyka worked as master printer at the Michigan Workshop of Fine Prints and completed a staff assistantship at the University of Michigan. In addition, his art has been displayed in many private, institutional, and corporate art collections and exhibitions. At Winthrop, Martyka was the fourth recipient of Winthrop's Elizabeth Dunlap Patrick Faculty Grant, a grant established to further new work, research or collaboration by faculty culminating in an exhibition project in the Patrick Gallery. An exhibition of his hand-printed cut paper collages, called Conversations with an Echo, ran in fall 2009 in the Patrick Gallery. One of the collages still hangs in the DiGiorgio Campus Center classroom across from the lobby desk. In the intricate details of this work, Martyka references cultural identities or art historical pieces as inspiration for color and form. The collages attracted regional attention and accolades poured in. In fall 2008, Martyka's collage Totemic Talk, was featured in the S.C. State Museum’s 20th Anniversary Juried Exhibition, and won Best in Show and the museum’s Purchase Award. His collages also have been featured in an Arts Council of York County exhibition. Martyka earned his B.F.A. and M.F.A. degrees at Wayne State University and the University of Michigan, respectively. For more information, contact Judy Longshaw, news and media services manager, at 803/323-2404 or longshawj@winthrop.edu.

Winthrop University faculty create public art for downtown Columbia, S.C.

[caption id="attachment_18349" align="alignright" width="224"]Shaun Dargan Cassidy and Tom Stanley, "Moments" Shaun Dargan Cassidy and Tom Stanley, "Moments"[/caption] One Columbia for Arts and History and the city of Columbia announce the installation of a second sculpture resulting from the public art pilot program. Commissioned with a donation from Agapé Senior, "Moments” was created by artists Shaun Dargan Cassidy and Tom Stanley. Both artists are faculty members in the College of Visual and Performing Arts at Winthrop University. The stainless steel sculpture is composed of an open box structure with an attic above and a tree root system below evoking memory and a collected lifetime of stories. These elements combine into a new sapling that grows up from these symbols of one’s life moments. Artist Shaun Cassidy explains, "'Moments' was designed to use recognizable imagery as triggers to provoke associations with memory, decay, growth, the past and the future. The sculpture is intended to be both contemplative and aspirational and to provide a quiet moment of beautiful visual poetry on Main Street.” “Agapé Senior is pleased to support the city and One Columbia’s public arts initiative by funding this sculpture," says Scott Middleton, founder and CEO of Agapé Senior. "Our company works to improve the communities in which we serve through local chambers and Rotary clubs, as well as nonprofit support, and now with our corporate headquarters on Main Street, this opportunity just seemed like a great fit for us. Plus, I am a graduate of Winthrop University, so having the artists from my alma mater create the piece made this project came full circle for me personally.” “Not only is this a great addition to Main Street, it also serves to demonstrate public art’s power to transform Columbia into a true city of creativity,” said Columbia Mayor Steve Benjamin. “None of this would be possible without strong public/private partnerships with great businesses like Agapé, and we’re very excited about what the future holds.” A public announcement ceremony will be held Feb. 5 at 10 a.m. at the sculpture on the 1600 block of Main Street. Artists interested in submitting their qualifications for consideration for future projects can find the call for artists on the One Columbia for Arts and History website at onecolumbiasc.com. About One Columbia for Arts and History One Columbia for Arts and History is a nonprofit corporation that works to promote collaboration among citizens, the cultural community, and city government through celebrations of Columbia’s arts and historic treasures. Its goal is to enhance the quality of life for our residents, attract tourist dollars to our city, and further build our vibrant community. In short, it serves as the promotional arm of the City for Columbia’s cultural community. Visit the One Columbia website (onecolumbiasc.com) for a continuously updated master list of art and cultural activities occurring throughout the city. Via: One Columbia

ABC school South Florence High shares arts program success

South Florence High School, an ABC Project success story, was highlighted in a recent school visit (article from the Florence Morning News.)
Albert Einstein reportedly once said “Creativity is intelligence having fun,” a mantra used Thursday at South Florence High School as it hosted more than 120 teachers from across the state for a conference aimed at showing how infusing the curricula with fine arts helps student excel across the board. South Florence is one of 46 ABC sites across the state and was selected to be spotlighted in the biannual school visit. The Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project is a collaboration hosted at Winthrop University and funded by the SC Arts Commission and the state Department of Education with the goal of encouraging and helping schools to enhance their fine arts programs and compete for precious grant funding for them. ABC Project Director Christine Fisher, a former Florence 1 music teacher and a South Carolina Teacher of the Year, said South Florence was an obvious choice for others to learn from because it is a success story that shows with careful planning and methodical implementation any school can grow its arts program and have students flourish. “South Florence has worked so hard and they have expanded all of their arts programs,” Fisher said. “They are offering theater, they are offering media arts, they have expanded their music program. ... They really have gone at this and done a great job and some schools try to do too much too soon, but South Florence has been very meticulous with following that strategic plan one step after another so that it’s very solid when it’s implemented.” Fisher said showing off the school helps other fine arts teachers and administrators not only have an avenue to share best practices, but to see that they too can start building a comprehensive arts program. South Florence has been a designated ABC site for more than 10 years and is currently one of two in Florence School District 1, along with its neighbor Southside Middle School. The ABC Project provides districts with professional development, collaboration and assistance in writing grants, both for the SC Arts Commission ABC grants and other federal and corporate grants, to help grow and deepen arts programming. Through the ABC Project, South Florence has successfully applied for and received $18,000 from the state department every year since 2003, and has also earned SC Arts Commission money of about $5,000-$8,000 each year, totaling more than $25,000 each year to grow arts programming. Now highly interested music and visual arts students have enough class offerings that they can take two credits a year, effectively taking intensive fine arts coursework throughout their entire high school career. South Florence Assistant Principal Jackie Shuler said the impact of being an ABC school and adding classes and funding has been immeasurable for students, who with arts education research shows have fewer dropout rates, better test scores and more educational engagement across the board. She said for years the arts were looked at as something on the side of education, a part of school that was often cut when budgets got tight, but at South Florence, they view it as something that is indispensable for student success in school and beyond. “What artists will want you to say is that art is worth it for art’s sake,” Shuler said, “but also for students, it brings the ability to memorize, to engage that memory, with singing and dancing and drama, all those things require you to be able to memorize. And once you can do that you realize how much easier all learning is. ... Medicine, engineering, teaching, health care, everything requires this ability to think and see things in your head.”
Related: South Florence High School celebrates ABC Project's 25th anniversary! (includes several photos) Via: Florence Morning News