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Grand Jeté returns with opportunities for S.C. dancers, dance teachers

REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Tuesday, February 1, 2022

 

Dance students from across the state will gather together to connect, compete, and cultivate their skills during the third annual Grand Jeté Student Ballet and Contemporary Dance Competition.

The now week-long event offers master classes led by guest artists, audition and recruitment events with national dance programs and teacher workshops for private studio and public school dance teachers. “This is not just a competition,” said Josée Garant, Grand Jeté director. “This is an opportunity for the dance community to come together, learn together and showcase the exceptional talent our state has to offer. Dance is such a competitive field, which is why we feel it is so important to host an event where dancers can get to know each other, support each other and consider their future in dance at the collegiate level.” Dance students, ages 10-19, who choose to compete have the chance to win prizes, totaling $5,250, in the categories of classical ballet, modern/contemporary and student choreography. They will also gain valuable feedback from the competition’s esteemed, out-of-state, adjudicators—Jorden Morris, Akua Noni Parker and Sarah Wroth. Morris is a retired principal dancer, choreographer and the current guest artistic director of the Orlando Ballet. Parker has performed as a leading company member with prestigious dance companies such as Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Dance Theatre of Harlem, Cincinnati Ballet and Ballet San Jose. Wroth is an associate professor of music in ballet and the chair of the ballet department at the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music. Competitors and noncompetitors can attend virtual information sessions and in-person audition classes with university and trainee dance program recruiters from Dean College, New World School of the Arts, Ohio State University, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, Texas Christian University, University of North Carolina Charlotte, University of Oklahoma, University of South Florida, University of Utah and others. They can also participate in in-person master classes in ballet and modern/contemporary. “Grand Jeté is the only event in South Carolina where high school juniors and seniors can share their talents with so many recruiters in one place,” Garant said. “This is an amazing opportunity for students seeking a summer intensive or university dance program with the potential to earn scholarships.” South Carolina dance instructors can also participate in Grand Jeté which offers in-person teacher workshops. Classes in beginner ballet, intermediate/advanced contemporary and intermediate/advanced ballet will be held for private studio teachers. K-12 public school teachers can register for workshops in historical dance, world dance, ballet fundamentals and modern/contemporary free of charge. Grand Jeté will be held March 1-6, 2022 with the competition occurring on March 6. Participants can choose to only attend their preferred events and are not required to attend for the full week. In-person events will be held on the Governor’s School’s campus in downtown Greenville. Interested individuals can register online at scgsah.org/grand-jete until February 1, 2022. Sponsorship opportunities are available. Contact the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Foundation at 864.282.1570 for more details.

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Eleven S.C. students recognized in national YoungArts competition

State places five finalists among 720 winners

[caption id="attachment_48776" align="aligncenter" width="850"] 2019 YoungArts winners in dance. Provided photo.[/caption]

Each year the National YoungArts Foundation holds one of the largest arts competitions for 15-18-year-old students that identifies the most accomplished young artists in the literary, visual and performing arts from around the country.

Winners are chosen for their caliber of artistic achievement by esteemed discipline-specific panels of artists through a rigorous blind adjudication process. This year, 11 students from South Carolina were recognized, including five finalists, who placed among the 720 winners and thousands of applications nationwide. The South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities had nine students who placed, including four finalists:
  • Christian Moody and Néoma Sanchez were named theater finalists;
  • Youjaye Daniels, writing finalist in poetry and honorable mention in creative non-fiction;
  • Kirby Wilson, writing finalist in creative non-fiction;
  • Remaliah Smith, music honorable mention in voice;
  • Grace Warren-Page, writing honorable mention in poetry and merit award in short story;
  • Madyson Grant, writing merit award in short story;
  • Deirdre Hickey, writing merit award in creative non-fiction;
  • and Karolina Montalvo, writing merit award in creative non-fiction.
Thomas Hicks, from Greer High School, was name a visual arts finalist. Sienna España, from the South Carolina Connections Academy, receconnectived a dance honorable mention in the ballet category. YoungArts award winners at all levels receive cash prizes between $100 and $10,000. In addition to monetary awards, all winners receive a medallion, a lifetime of creative and professional support, and access to YoungArts Post—a private, online portal for YoungArts artists to connect, share their work and discover new opportunities. Finalists are invited to participate in National YoungArts Week in January 2022, where they will be offered virtual classes, workshops and mentorship from professional artists. They will also be able to exhibit or perform their work to the public and compete for higher honors. A complete list of the 2022 winners is available online at youngarts.org/winners.
About S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in an arts-centered community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students. The Governor’s School also serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. SCGSAH.org. Follow @SCGSAH on FacebookInstagram, and Twitter.  

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Arts learning partnership announces name, website

 


for immediate release

COLUMBIA, S.C. – “Arts Grow SC” is the name of the three-year, $20 million partnership to address pandemic-related learning loss announced in June by the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) and South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE).

Arts Grow SC was established to help public schools throughout the state address pandemic related learning loss with proven, arts-based learning initiatives. Though managed by the SCAC, the program has its own logo and this week officially launched its website: https://artsgrowsc.org/. There, interested educators, parents, and other stakeholders can subscribe to its newsletter. “The South Carolina Arts Commission is extremely proud to take this next step in the life of arts education in South Carolina. ArtsGrowSC is uniting dedicated partners who have a wealth of experience in arts instruction and in integrating the arts across other instructional areas” SCAC Executive Director David Platts said. “Generous funding from the South Carolina Department of Education is allowing more teachers, administrators, districts, artists, and community partners to plug in to this unprecedented work than ever before.” This past spring, leadership from the SCAC proposed to assist SCDE in addressing pandemic-related learning loss with a creative pathway—rooted in innovation and evidence-based practices—that the arts are equipped to provide. Funding was requested to allow the SCAC’s team of professionals and network of partners to:
  • help schools and teachers fill learning loss gaps in the arts,
  • use arts integration to remediate core subject areas,
  • and provide summer and afterschool learning opportunities that leverage the arts in schools throughout the state.
The SCDE approved $20 million for the SCAC to implement its plan, now known as Arts Grow SC, over the course of the next three years. To realize its classroom-based goals, the SCAC will rely on its partners at the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project, which currently serves about 44,000 students in 74 schools and has been cooperatively led for more than 30 years by the SCAC, SCDE, and Winthrop University. In addition, the SCAC will expand existing pilot projects with the South Carolina Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities in Greenville and Engaging Creative Minds in Charleston and will offer grant and programming opportunities for arts education providers across the state. Further information is available on ArtsGrowSC.org and by emailing info@artsgrowsc.org.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

The mission of the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina. We envision a South Carolina where the arts are valued and all people benefit from a variety of creative experiences. A state agency created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas: arts education, community arts development, and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the SCAC is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. Visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696, and follow @scartscomm on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter for #Arts4SC and #SCartists content.

Jason Rapp

S.C. Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities open house coming

Tour the state's arts high school


As if there weren't enough seasonal reasons to head to the Upstate on a fall weekend, this Saturday another presents itself this Saturday.

The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) invites families from across the state to visit its campus in Greenville this Saturday, Nov. 6. During Go Govie! Day, guests will learn more about the arts school’s summer programs and tuition-free residential high school while touring campus and participating in arts demonstrations, workshops and information sessions. Register to attend at SCGSAH.org/go-govie-day. “We want everyone in South Carolina to know about the transformational opportunities that the Governor’s School offers young artists in middle school and high school,” said SCGSAH President Dr. Cedric Adderley. “The best way to really understand what the Govie experience is all about is to join us on campus and see our community in action.”
S.C. Governors School for the Arts Humanities students Located in downtown Greenville, the Governor’s School offers pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. Students learn from established, practicing artists in an environment that provides the support and resources needed to hone their artistic abilities. The campus includes specialized arts studios, state-of-the-art performance halls, a world-class library and dedicated rehearsal spaces. Governor’s School graduates attend the nation’s top colleges, universities and conservatories, and many students receive arts and academic scholarships. The Residential High School program has been nationally recognized by U.S. News and World Report, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast and Niche. The Palmetto Gold award-winning high school consistently ranks above state and national averages for SAT and ACT scores and had a 100 percent graduation and college acceptance rate for the 2020-2021 school year. The reviews and rankings site Niche.com ranked the Governor’s School the third “Best College Prep High School” and the fourth “Best Public High School” in South Carolina. The Governor’s School is currently accepting applications for the 2022/2023 residential high school and summer programs. Any South Carolina resident in grades 6-11 is eligible to apply. For those who cannot attend Go Govie! Day, the Governor’s School’s Office of Admissions also hosts virtual information sessions. Interested individuals can learn more at SCGSAH.org/admissions.

Jason Rapp

Actor-teachers needed for full-time elementary school roles

Positions available across the state

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Continuous

South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities' Spark! program is seeking a diverse team of full time actor-teachers to bring drama groups and classes to elementary aged children in far flung corners of the state.

Through a literacy-oriented, research-based model, actor-teachers will each cover two elementary schools per year within their geographical hub area (Pee Dee, Midlands, Lowcountry, Piedmont, etc). Actor-teachers will bring co-teaching, arts integration, outside performers, professional learning opportunities, ongoing drama classes and sample lessons, as well as summer intensive drama groups during the Read to Succeed camps. They will have state wide support, curriculum support and full training. Artists and educators with non-traditional backgrounds are welcome to apply. Maturity and organizational skills are a must. Confidence and the ability to work in someone else's space are essential. Applied theatre and creative dramatics knowledge, experience with elementary aged children, storytelling or interactive performances experiences are all very helpful. Submit cover letter, along with CV or resume along with the appropriate state application. Specific job descriptions and state application are posted here on the SCGSAH website. Positions are titled "Project Coordinator" for the lead actor-teacher ($52K), and "Curriculum Coordinator" for the 5 actor-teachers ($42K) for the regional areas. Lead actor-teacher and grant director will visit sites, support efforts and provide training. These are temporary grant funded full-time positions with benefits. They will be based from home and in local schools, but will need to travel at times to population centers for group training and support—those travel expenses are paid and time flexed out. Daily travel between home and assigned schools will not be typically reimbursed. This is primarily weekday work, during school hours, aside from periodic training days. Training and startup will be a combination of in-person and online workshops. COVID protocols for DOE, SCGSAH and local schools will be followed. The lead actor teacher should be prepared to spend part of every week traveling to sites around the state and is likely best based in Columbia or nearby. Theatre people and educators who are self starters, active and organized facilitators, good relationship builders, and playful activists are a good fit. Applicants should send their information to SCGSAH's Human Resources Director LaTomya Doctor. Applications and resumes will be submitted for review once all materials are received in HR. Looking forward to meeting some exciting and energetic applicants!
This expanded Spark! project is a three year grant funded program made possible thanks to Arts Grow SC, which is funded by the South Carolina Arts Commission and the South Carolina Department of Education through American Rescue Plan Elementary and Secondary Schools Emergency Relief (ARP ESSER) funds. There are no costs to partnering schools or school districts for participation in Spark. This work builds on a previous, nationally recognized five year pilot project recently completed. In 2020, Spark’s research methodology was recognized nationally with the Arts School’s Network’s Research Initiative - Institution Award.

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S.C.’s arts high school welcomes 112 to Greenville campus

Residential high school opens for 2021/2022


The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities announced 112 artistically talented in-state students selected to attend its residential high school program in the 2021/2022 school year.

“Each year, we reach out across South Carolina to encourage passionate young artists to follow their dreams by applying to the Governor’s School,” Governor’s School President Cedric Adderley said. “We commend these students who rose to the top for their talents and dedication to their art. They will be rewarded with a transformative experience that will prepare them for life success where ever they choose to go from here.” These are the students participating after completing a competitive application and audition process: Aiken
  • Gary Crews, North Augusta High School
  • Maggie Davisson, South Aiken High School
Allendale
  • Jet Joyner, Allendale Fairfax High School
Anderson
  • Caroline Baker, Palmetto High School
  • Savannah Bell, Belton-Honea Path High School
  • Cassi Bleitz, Wren High School
  • Rachael Clark, Pendleton High School
  • Larissa Fowler, Powdersville High School
  • Anne Hughes, T. L. Hanna High School
  • Cydney Jenkins, Wren High School
  • Lillian Morris, Wren High School
  • Nathan Watt, Wren High School
Bamberg 
  • Marquez Turner, Denmark Olar High School
Berkeley
  • Kyra Blanthorn, Goose Creek High School
  • Alyssa Cousino, Goose Creek High School
  • Liv Dermody, SC Connections Academy
  • Jake Montroy, Stratford High School
Charleston
  • Cadence Heidenreich, University School of the Lowcountry
  • Deirdre Hickey, Bishop England High School
  • Adlai Moore, Palmetto Christian Academy
  • Hudson Seifert, Wando High School
  • Meredith Taylor, Lucy Beckham High School
Chesterfield
  • Ella Prevatte, Cheraw High School
Darlington
  • Jessica Hamilton, Mayo High School for Math Science and Technology
  • Paige Higgins, SC Connections Academy
  • Leah Smith, Mayo High School for Math Science and Technology
Dorchester
  • Lily Brittain, Ashley Ridge High School
  • Midori Brown, Ashley Ridge High School
  • Empress Fogle, Summerville High School
  • Elodie Hamilton, Summerville High School
  • Tyler Hanson, Summerville High School
  • Lainey Keefauver, SC Connections Academy
  • Erin Semple, Fort Dorchester High School
  • Brooke Turner, Fort Dorchester High School
Florence
  • Grace Farnsworth, Wilson High School
Greenville 
  • Bella Bishara, Greenville Technical Charter High School
  • Landon Bollinger, Wade Hampton High School
  • Carmen Bunche, J. L. Mann High Academy
  • Katie Cunningham, Eastside High School
  • Rusty Daniel, Brashier Middle College
  • Shania Dotson, Berea High School
  • Piper Dunn, Saint Joseph's Catholic School
  • Joplin Gagné, Brashier Middle College
  • Tota Garboua, Eastside High School
  • Kiran Hafner, Greenville Technical Charter High School
  • Griffin Jones, Wade Hampton High School
  • Clara Lanning, Riverside High School
  • Gianna Marullo, Wade Hampton High School
  • Karolina Montalvo, Saint Joseph's Catholic School
  • Abigail Nelsen, Mauldin High School
  • Seth Nodurft, Live Oak High School
  • Maya Pinto, Mauldin High School
  • Tom Stanton, Saint Joseph's Catholic School
  • Kate Tolchinsky, Riverside High School
Natalie Ware, Mauldin High School
  • Meredith Wiper, Saint Joseph's Catholic School
Greenwood 
  • Alan Tran, Emerald High School
Hampton
  • Norah Kehrli, Lowcountry Montessori School
  • Margo Morris, South Carolina Virtual Charter School
Horry
  • Connor Fanny, South Carolina Virtual Charter School
  • Ryan Vasquez, Scholars Academy High School
Kershaw
  • Laina Canetto, Sandhills School
Lancaster 
  • Ace Denham, Lancaster High School
  • Emma Estridge, Andrew Jackson High School
Lexington 
  • Kat Davis, Spring Hill High School
  • Liwa Hamidi, River Bluff High School
  • Cassidy Holt, Chapin High School
  • Kyle Humphries, Airport High School
  • Molly Smith, Irmo High School
  • Eevee Snider, Lexington High School
  • Owen Whitehead, Brookland-Cayce Senior High School
Oconee
  • Ava Beasley, George Washington High School
  • Hannah Brinkley, Seneca High School
  • Eddy Lopez-Yanez, Walhalla High School
  • Samuel Prosser, Seneca High School
  • Bella Winkler, Seneca High School
Orangeburg
  • Sarai Winkler, Gray Collegiate Academy
Pickens 
  • Kaylee Bennett, D. W. Daniel High School
  • Skyler Green, D.W. Daniel High School
  • Claire Manson, D. W. Daniel High School
Richland 
  • Maddie Aitken, A. C. Flora High School
  • Noah Allen, Spring Hill High School
  • Mackenzie Ice, Spring Hill High School
  • Carrena Spann, Richland Northeast High School
  • Logan Stephens, Spring Hill High School
  • Reagan Taylor, Spring Hill High School
  • David Vandelay, Spring Valley High School
  • Malcolm Wright, Ridge View High School
Spartanburg 
  • Michael Cassel, Greer High School
  • Cassie Cullison, James F. Byrnes High School
  • Taylor Frazier, Cyber Academy of South Carolina
  • Isabel Hong, James F. Byrnes High School
  • Christy Hudson, Oakbrook Preparatory School
  • Anna Ilie, Oakbrook Preparatory School
  • Emma McLeod, Dorman High School
Union
  • Hayden Thompson, Union County High School
York
  • Trey Buie, Westminster Catawba Christian School
  • Jackson Haywood, Clover High School
  • Kat Hoover, Nation Ford High School
  • Maggie Keenum, Fort Mill High School
  • Caris Kulbok, York Preparatory Academy
  • Grant Luebbe, Nation Ford High School
  • Natalie Sevel, Nation Ford High School
  • Julia Smith, Fort Mill High School
  • Nahari Suchanek, Clover High School
  • Sarah Swoope, SC Connections Academy
  • Lua Yousefian, York Preparatory Academy
The Governor’s School opened its doors for the 2021/2022 school year on Aug. 14 for in-person classes, after a year of virtual and hybrid learning, with the mantra “2021-2022: Reset. Refresh. Renew.”
Located in downtown Greenville, the Governor’s School offers pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. Students attend from all over the state to learn from established, practicing artists in an environment that provides the resources needed to hone their artistic abilities. This includes  specialized arts studios, state-of-the-art performance halls, a world-class library and dedicated rehearsal spaces. Tuition is free and financial assistance is available to cover meal plans and residence hall fees. Governor’s School graduates attend the nation’s top colleges, universities and conservatories, and many students receive arts and academic scholarships. The residential high school program has been nationally recognized by U.S. News and World Report, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast and Niche. The Palmetto Gold award-winning high school consistently ranks above state and national averages for SAT and ACT scores and had a 100% graduation and college acceptance rate for the 2020-2021 school year. The reviews and rankings site Niche.com ranked the Governor’s School the third “Best College Prep High School” and the fourth “Best Public High School” in South Carolina. South Carolina students interested in attending the Governor’s School’s Residential High School or summer programs can apply online at SCGSAH.org beginning Sept.15, 2021 for the 2022-2023 school year.
About S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in a arts-centered community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students. The Governor’s School also serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. SCGSAH.org. Follow @SCGSAH on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.
All photos provided.

Jason Rapp

Rock Hill teen named youth poet laureate

It's a South Carolina first


Rock Hill was recently the host city for the “One Word Poetry Festival,” a creation of Rock Hill Poet Laureate Angelo Geter.

This three-day festival attracted a large crowd for a first-time event. Many of the events were free, open to the public and well attended. One of the major events was the selection of a youth poet laureate. Thirteen young poets submitted their work and 17-year-old Alexandra Aradas was named the winner. Not only is this distinction an honor for her personally, but also for Rock Hill and South Carolina; she is the city's and state's first youth poet laureate. Aradas is a rising senior at the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities in Greenville. While her concentration is creative writing, she hopes to have a career in politics. The Rock Hill Youth Poet Laureate Program celebrates and honors teen poets who exhibit a commitment to not just artistic excellence, but also civic engagement, youth leadership and social justice. The position has a one-year term. Aradas will be celebrated Thursday, July 29 at 7 p.m. at the Center for the Arts/Arts Council of York County (121 East Main St., Rock Hill).

Jason Rapp

$20 million partnership to expand S.C. arts learning initiatives

SCAC, S.C. Dept. of Education make landmark announcement

[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="601"]Photo of elementary-aged students and their teachers doing projects in an arts classroom. An Arts in Basic Curriculum Project site classroom. SCAC file photo.[/caption]
For Immediate Release

A $20 million partnership announced today by the South Carolina Department of Education and South Carolina Arts Commission will help public schools throughout the state address pandemic related learning loss with proven, arts-based learning initiatives.

The American Rescue Plan, passed by the U.S. Congress and signed into law March 11, 2021 by President Biden, included $121.9 billion in Elementary and Secondary School Emergency Relief funds (ARP ESSER), that has been administered through the U.S. Department of Education to state educational agencies. The South Carolina Department of Education (SCDE) is set to receive $2.1 billion in ARP ESSER funds to help South Carolina’s public schools address the impact that COVID-19 has and continues to have on students, families, educators, and school communities. Ninety percent of these funds will flow through to school districts with amounts determined in proportion to the amount of Title I, Part A funds they received in Summer 2020 from funds under the Every Student Succeeds Act. The remaining funds, which amount to $211,205,148 are to be used for state-level activities to address learning loss, summer enrichment programs, and comprehensive after school programs. The SCDE solicited public input on the use of these funds and the needs that the state should address in its ARP ESSER plan which was submitted to the U.S. Department of Education on June 18, 2021. Leadership from the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) proposed to SCDE a creative pathway—rooted in innovation and evidence-based practices—that the arts are equipped to provide. Funding was requested to allow the SCAC’s team of professionals and network of partners to:
  • help schools and teachers fill learning loss gaps in the arts,
  • use arts integration to remediate core subject areas,
  • and provide summer and afterschool learning opportunities that leverage the arts in schools throughout the state.
The SCDE approved $20 million for the SCAC to implement its plan over the course of the next three years. “As a longtime music teacher, I have seen firsthand the impact that arts education can have on students,” said State Superintendent of Education Molly Spearman. “The arts have a unique ability to engage students of diverse backgrounds across all subject areas which makes this initiative well suited for the receipt of these funds.” “The South Carolina Arts Commission is confident in its ability to put this funding to use right away to equitably impact learning using the arts,” SCAC Executive Director David Platts said. “Our team of professionals manages existing programs, partnerships, and grant-making infrastructure for this work, which includes federal and state reporting for accountability. ARP ESSER funding from the SCDE will enable expedient and effective scaling with various arts education partners on the local, state, and national levels.” Programmatic focus areas of the SCAC’s plan include:
  • Arts integration
  • Arts in early childhood
  • Arts industry certification credentials for high school students, building on existing vocational training programs
To realize its classroom-based goals, the SCAC will rely on its partners at the Arts in Basic Curriculum (ABC) Project, which currently serves about 44,000 students in 74 schools and has been cooperatively led for more than 30 years by the SCAC, SCDE, and Winthrop University. The ARP ESSER funding will facilitate scaling the program to:
  • increase access to quality arts education (targeting underserved communities)
  • develop arts-rich learning environments
  • build, restore, expand, and support infrastructure for arts learning at the district level
  • research and develop new and innovative instructional practices.
“We have a couple of years’ worth of recent Gallup Organization research looking at South Carolina’s arts-rich schools. It repeatedly shows a link between arts-rich learning and student hope and engagement. We have dreamed about having the kind of funding that would enable expansion to all communities throughout the state,” SCAC Board Chairwoman Dee Crawford said. In addition to building on the work of the ABC Project, the Arts Commission will expand existing pilot projects with the South Carolina Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities in Greenville and Engaging Creative Minds in Charleston, and will offer grant and programming opportunities for arts education providers across the state. “Arts and creativity are critical to achieving the knowledge, skills, and characteristics outlined by the Profile of the South Carolina Graduate. We are excited to work with grantees, statewide partners in arts education, and other arts providers to ensure equitable access to learning in and through the arts,” Platts said. “This partnership fully supports our mission to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina.” The SCAC is working now to release information on grant guidelines, research to support evidence-based practices, partnership and professional learning opportunities, and more in coming weeks. Starting in July, these resources will be available at www.abcprojectsc.com.

Jason Rapp

Nine Upstate students recognized in national arts competition

Students stand out in national applicant pool


Each year the National YoungArts Foundation holds one of the largest student art competitions highlighting promising young artists, ages 15-18, in the literary, visual, design and performing arts from around the country.

This year, nine students from South Carolina, including two finalists, were selected as winners from an applicant pool of over 7,400 nationally. The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities had seven students who placed, including Isaiah Boozer, theater finalist; Tyler Wesley, theater finalist; Grace Warren-Page, honorable mention for creative nonfiction; Alexa Smith, theater merit; Jaden McGuire, visual arts merit; Katherine Davis, creative nonfiction merit, and Felix Killingsworth, poetry merit. The Fine Arts Center in Greenville also had two students who placed, including Thomas Hicks, honorable mention for photography, and Philip Rawlinson, classical music merit in viola. "YoungArts empowers artists to pursue a life in the arts beginning at the critical time when many are faced with decisions about life after high school,” said Executive Director Jewel Malone. “This group of extraordinary artists has reminded us yet again that extraordinary artistry is ageless, and I encourage everyone to get to know these faces and names as we will be seeing them for many years to come." YoungArts award winners at the finalist level were invited to participate in National YoungArts Week + held earlier this month featuring virtual classes, workshops and mentorship from internationally renowned artists. A virtual showcase featuring these finalists will be held Jan. 25-30. For the full schedule, visit https://www.youngarts.org/national-youngarts-week. Finalists are also eligible to be nominated to become a U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts, one of the highest honors given high school seniors bestowed by the President of the United States. This year, YoungArts award winners at all levels will receive cash prizes between $100 and $10,000 and the opportunity to learn from leading artists such as Debbie Allen, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Frank Gehry, Wynton Marsalis, Salman Rushdie and Mickalene Thomas. YoungArts winners also become part of an alumni network of over 20,000 artists, which offers them additional professional opportunities throughout their careers.

About The National YoungArts Foundation

The National YoungArts Foundation (YoungArts) was established in 1981 by Lin and Ted Arison to identify and nurture the most accomplished young artists in the visual, literary, design and performing arts, and assist them at critical junctures in their educational and professional development. Through a wide range of annual programs, regular performances, and partnerships with some of the nation's leading cultural institutions, YoungArts aspires to create a strong community of alumni and a platform for a lifetime of encouragement, opportunity and support. YoungArts' signature program is an application-based award for emerging artists ages 15-18 or in grades 10-12 from across the U.S. Selected through a blind adjudication process, YoungArts winners receive valuable support, including financial awards of up to $10,000, professional development and educational experiences working with renowned mentors-such as Debbie Allen, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Rebecca Walker, Plácido Domingo, Frank Gehry, Jeff Koons, Wynton Marsalis, Salman Rushdie and Carrie Mae Weems-and performance and exhibition opportunities at some of the nation's leading cultural institutions, including the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Museum of Modern Art and New World Center. Additionally, YoungArts Winners are eligible for nomination as a U.S. Presidential Scholar in the Arts, one of the nation's highest honors for high school students who exemplify academic and artistic excellence. YoungArts winners become part of a thousands-strong alumni network of artists, which offers them additional professional opportunities throughout their careers. YoungArts alumni who have gone on to become leading professionals in their fields include actresses Viola Davis, Anna Gunn, Zuzanna Szadkowski and Kerry Washington; Broadway stars Raúl Esparza, Billy Porter, Andrew Rannells and Tony Yazbeck; recording artists Josh Groban, Judith Hill and Chris Young; Metropolitan Opera star Eric Owens; musicians Terence Blanchard, Gerald Clayton, Jennifer Koh and Elizabeth Roe; choreographers Camille A. Brown and Desmond Richardson; visual artists Daniel Arsham and Hernan Bas; internationally acclaimed multimedia artist Doug Aitken; New York Times bestselling author Sam Lipsyte; and Academy Award-winning filmmaker Doug Blush. Carnival Foundation is the YoungArts National Premier Sponsor. For more information, visit youngarts.org, facebook.com/YoungArtsFoundation or twitter.com/YoungArts.

About S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities

Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in the areas of creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. As a public, residential high school, serving juniors and seniors, students refine their talents in a master-apprentice community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students. SCGSAH also serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools.

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S.C. Governor’s School for Arts recognized for arts ed research

Link uncovered between drama curriculum and reading success


The Arts Schools Network Board of Directors has awarded the Research Initiative-Institution Award to the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities.

The award honors an organization for its commitment to ongoing research and the dissemination of knowledge in research in arts education. The Governor's School's research initiative, implemented by the Office of Outreach in partnership with the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) and University of South Carolina Department of Theatre and Dance, examines the potential impact that drama curriculum has on reading motivation and success for young children. Melissa Brookes, managing director for ASN, said, “Each year the Arts Schools Network board of directors take great pride in honoring and recognizing schools and individuals for their extraordinary efforts and impact throughout arts education. This year, we are thrilled to recognize the Governor’s School as the winner of our Research Initiative Award.” In the Spark! outreach program that this research is based on, at-risk third-grade readers attending the state mandated Read-To-Succeed summer program are exposed to drama principles in addition to their reading requirements. Now in its third year, Spark! participants are showing increased gains in creativity measures like fluency and originality, along with critical reading measures required by MAP testing, when compared to similar students not exposed to the drama component. “While we are only three years into this five-year initiative, the combination of creativity gains and reading gains together are what draws us further into this research, and we’re very excited to see these promising trends,” said Carol Baker, outreach director at the Governor’s School. “We’re grateful for this acknowledgement from the Arts Schools Network and for the ongoing support and participation of our partners, the South Carolina Arts Commission, who is funding this project, and the USC Department of Theatre and Dance, who is compiling and analyzing the data.”

About the Research

Dr. Peter Duffy, who heads the Master of Arts in Teaching program in theatre education at the University of South Carolina is leading this research which combines the qualitative measures of theatre making and creativity with quantitative methods of reading and motivation. “This research matters because it examines how story, motivation, and embodied learning through drama can impact a child’s desire to read, and how this component can affect the way young readers interact with their reading materials,” said Duffy. “We are studying how more creative teaching methods can motivate readers to really know the story inside and out. “Our research suggests that students who engage in the drama work make small but important improvements in their overall reading scores. Gathering five years of data will help us see whether these trends hold overtime, giving us a stronger impression of the real impact these programs can make.” The Spark! program was initiated at Kenneth Gardner Elementary in Williamsburg County School District, and thanks to two years of early positive findings, received increased funding to expand to Hardeeville Elementary in Jasper County School District. Both districts serve high poverty, rural, under-resourced populations and neither has a certified drama teacher at any level. Each school offers a multi-week summer remedial reading camp for rising fourth-grade students at risk of retention due to low test scores. The summer camp is part of the Read-to-Succeed program and is the last possible opportunity for these young students to increase their scores enough to move on to the next grade. How this research impacts arts education funding priorities “The Spark! outreach program’s research into the relationship between drama and reading in young, at-risk readers, provides compelling evidence of the correlation between creativity and reading retention,” said David Platts, executive director of the SCAC. “Working with Dr. Duffy and his team at the University of South Carolina and the SC Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities has demonstrated how these types of programs, while specifically designed to help students, also provide vital information for agencies such as ours as we analyze and prioritize our programming decisions. Good decisions and responsible stewardship of public funds are possible only with the availability of solid and meaningful research and data.” Getting students back on track “Ultimately, this is about improving reading skills and reading motivation of young students in South Carolina,” said Dr. Cedric Adderley, Governor’s School president. “We know that early reading comprehension is the key to success, and in this day and time, when we’re seeing reading regression in elementary school students due to pandemic-imposed virtual learning, we hope that programs like Spark! will be part of the solution to getting these students back on track.” “At the Governor’s School, we see first-hand how incorporating the arts into education can help improve student engagement, academic success, motivation, and hope for the future,” continued Adderley. “Now our challenge, as an arts resource and research center for teachers and students throughout the state, is to expand these proven programs to impact more students in need.”

About SC Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities

Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in the areas of creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in an arts-centered community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students. The Governor’s School serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. SCGSAH.org

About the Arts Schools Network

Dedicated to excellence and leadership in arts education, Arts Schools Network, a non-profit association founded in 1981, provides arts school leaders, innovative partners and members of arts education institutions with quality resources, support and networking opportunities. Visit www.artsschoolsnetwork.org to learn more.
Image by Amberrose Nelson from Pixabay

Jason Rapp