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Great Place to Bee

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Thursday, September 30, 2021


While not in South Carolina, Gastonia, North Carolina is just a stone's throw away!

Keep Gastonia Beautiful’s art committee seeks to commission artwork for the downtown area of Gastonia, North Carolina titled “Great Place to Bee” and include interactive smaller art pieces that will weave/waggle their way through Main Street to a larger art piece. The artwork will be sited in a prominent location at a Gateway to the new FUSE Baseball Stadium. We are currently looking for an artist who could fabricate unique 3-D bees as a creative way for Keep Gastonia Beautiful to showcase its Bee City USA affiliation by educating our community about the importance of bees and pollinators through public art. This project, titled “Great Place to Bee,” has the potential to create a buzz of excitement and interest for the entire downtown. Custom metal bees will “waggle” (a waggle is a movement performed by a honeybee at the hive or nest, to indicate to other bees the direction and distance of a source of food) through downtown as part of a scavenger/honey hunt. At each stop of the scavenger/honey hunt we would include fun facts about bees, and depending on the location, the historical significance. We envision groups “buzzing” around downtown searching for these bees. The “end” of the hunt will lead groups to a new art installation, envisioned as a kinetic piece where bees will be “swarming” around a hive near the baseball stadium, home of the Honey Hunters. We are looking for around 8-12 bees to start with the potential to grow, at least 3 inches in length but we are open for interpretation and the ending sculpture should connect and coordinate the bees to their final location. Metal bees should be able to be moved over time to different locations. We believe it’s important to recognize where we came from in order to see where we are headed and encourage you to use the nectar of your imagination when creating this project. View the RFP here (PDF). The deadline to submit materials is Thursday, Sept. 30, 2021.
Photo by Antonella Pal from Pexels

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Columbia honors remarkable women with new statue

Unveiled today across from the State House

[caption id="attachment_47306" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Click image to enlarge.[/caption]

At a morning press conference at the northwest corner of Main and Gervais Streets today, Columbia thought leaders and Mayor Steve Benjamin spoke at the official “unveiling” of Architecture of Strength, a brand new monument celebrating the historical accomplishments of women in Columbia.

[caption id="attachment_47308" align="alignright" width="204"] Click image to enlarge.[/caption] Designed to inspire inclusion and honor remarkable women, Architecture of Strength will be a permanent monument to celebrate and honor women in Columbia and is an initiative of Columbia City of Women. The position of the monument confronts the lack of women’s representation in the public sphere and speaks truth to power at the physical intersection of the major power in our community: commerce (Main Street) and government (Gervais Street), across from the State House. Architecture of Strength will inspire the community to learn more about and celebrate the historical contributions women have made to our city, to inspire a more hopeful and inclusive vision of our future. “Women deserve to be seen and heard in this city,” said Ann Warner, executive director of WREN (Women’s Rights Empowerment Network), who spoke at the press conference. “This is a lasting monument to women from the past and present who pushed boundaries, stood up for others, and made Columbia a better place.” Architecture of Strength, by Deedee Morrison, is made of 316 polished stainless steel pipes that are laser-cut and welded to create the sculpture. It is also illuminated for night-time viewing in its prominent location. The form begins with the foundation, a circular pillar of strength. The layering of the lives in meaning and the contributions of these women to Columbia, create the form. The sculpture is a form made up of many parts, the parts of the female that are invaluable in every community. Family, vision, courage, strength, integrity, honor, hope, resilience, intelligence, compassion, steadfastness, determination and drive hold our community together. The faceless, nameless nature of this art represents the idea that it takes all kinds of women, all shapes, all sizes, and beliefs, to build a community. The monument’s front faces the South Carolina State House as a direct statement that though there are a wealth of monuments on the State House grounds, and many of them controversial, none of them celebrate women in any meaningful way. “As one of the most traveled intersections in South Carolina’s capital city, this monument is a daily reminder of women’s strength, perseverance and power,” said Robin Waites, executive director of Historic Columbia, who also spoke at the press conference. Historic Columbia, WREN, and Columbia City of Women steering committee thank former First Lady Rachel Hodges for her vision of Columbia City of Women, Central Carolina Community Foundation with support from the Knight Foundation, and Beth Richardson for fundraising support. Additionally, Dr. Mary Baskin-Waters and Mr. Samuel Waters, Jerry Davis in honor of Judy Davis, Sue Doran and Dr. Lilly and Mr. Bruce Filler invested in the creation of Architecture of Strength. One Columbia and the City of Columbia also provided support for this monument, as did Holder Properties and Hood Construction.

Artist's statement

Architecture of Strength sets a new tone to spark curiosity and awareness of our collective history, simultaneously encouraging bold acts of belonging and inclusion of the underrepresented, marginalized and segregated members of our society. How we choose to honor and remember the past, will always direct the pathway into our future. This is the moment of embarkation for Architecture of Strength She is to honor the original City of Women honorees, but she provides inclusion for all. From this fixed luminous point, we incorporate a broader, more encompassing view of our history and move into a new dimension of thought. One of wholeness and unity and fostering a broader expression of justice and equality. Architecture of Strength gracefully stands,17 feet tall on a circular foundation.  What was once many pieces of stainless steel pipe in varying sizes, is now welded back together, her strength being created from the sum of parts. As I created her I reflected on the many and the nameless who have come before us and shown the way through strength and conviction. I have deep gratitude to the City of Women and Columbia to have been a part of this public art journey with you. Deedee Morrison Architecture of Strength 2021 Columbia, S.C.

Jason Rapp

Public art promotes mask usage in Spartanburg

Public call for art also issued


In response to increased COVID-19 cases and as part of the Bringing Back the ‘Burg initiative, Chapman Cultural Center is partnering with the Spartanburg Area Chamber of Commerce on a county-wide public art campaign that promotes the use of face masks by encouraging residents and businesses to place temporary face masks on public art.

The public is encouraged to participate by placing temporary face masks on pre-identified pieces of public art. Eligible pieces of art can be found here. Businesses may also participate by placing temporary masks on privately-owned visible works of art. According to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control, “There is rapidly growing medical evidence that the use of face masks along with social distancing can greatly reduce the transmission of the COVID-19 virus in public spaces and places where people at higher risk of severe illness and death from this virus are likely to be present. We must all commit to wearing face masks in public spaces — if we all wear them, we’ll all be protected.” Masks are available for purchase at many local pharmacy retailers, grocery stores, box stores and boutiques.

Public call for art

In addition to placing masks on existing public art, the campaign includes a call for proposals for a new public art project that promotes the importance of wearing face masks to reduce the spread of COVID-19. Local artists should submit inquiries and proposals by June 26. The selected proposal will receive an award of $1,000 in addition to funding the cost of materials for the project. Artists interested in submitting a proposal, or who would like more information, should contact Chapman Cultural Center’s Community Impact and Outreach Director Melissa Earley at mEarley@spartanarts.org or 864.278.9685.
Chapman Cultural Center realizes that the arts can be a powerful vehicle for change as evidence from previous public art campaigns addressing serious issues in the community such as the Bloomberg Philanthropies project, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light. As an extension of National Night Out, an annual event that promotes crime prevention efforts, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light sought to improve police-community partnership, and neighborhood camaraderie through the arts.   Chapman Cultural Center and the Spartanburg Chamber are committed to prioritizing public health and reducing the spread of COVID-19 while carrying out their respective organizational missions. "Bringing Back the 'Burg" is Spartanburg's COVID-19 recovery effort. Other initiatives include a Business Recovery Task Force, Open for Business Guidebook, Combating COVID-19 Commitment and marketing campaigns.

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Public art opportunity in the City of Clemson

Proposed Project: Public mural project in downtown Clemson


The Project

The City of Clemson Arts and Culture Commission has initiated a public mural project as way of establishing a public art presence in downtown Clemson. The artwork will be located on the side wall of a historic building in downtown Clemson. Clemson community members will be invited and encouraged to participate in the process of selecting the artwork.

Goals

  • Establish a public art presence in downtown Clemson
  • Create a piece of public art for an outdoor environment that reflects the spirit, history, and uniqueness of the City of Clemson
  • Engage the Clemson residential and business community in the decision-making process
  • Promote downtown Clemson as a destination dedicated to fostering community collaborations and partnerships
  • Select a dedicated and qualified artist or artist team that can demonstrate artistic excellence while completing this project on time and within budget

2020 Schedule

  • January 17: RFP released
  • February 21: Deadline for Questions
  • March 2: RFP closes
  • March 10: Short list of proposals selected
  • March 23 - 31: Community engagement and voting
  • April 6: Final artist announced
  • May 8: Final design due from artist
  • May 12: Final design review and approval
  • No later than August 1: Art production completed
Completed proposals will be on display at Clemson City Hall from March 23-31, 2020. Community members will be invited to share their input. Please see more information at the link to the RPF PDF file on the City of Clemson website.

Really? Vandal or vandals damage mural in Columbia park

Juveniles suspected by police


From The State this morning: [caption id="attachment_43362" align="alignright" width="150"]confused man Yeah, we don't get it.[/caption]

“The mural was apparently damaged Sunday night. Columbia police have watched surveillance video from the parking lot, but so far no arrests have been made.

Park workers removed the graffiti Monday and Tuesday. However, the chemicals used also marred parts of the painting.

“'They did a decent job of getting the tag (graffiti) off, but it did some damage to the paint on the mural,' said Lee Snelgrove, executive director of One Columbia for Arts and Culture. 'It will require (the artist) to come back and touch up the areas.'”

Read the full story here. (Subscription might be required.) The mural in question is in Riverfront Park along the flood-damaged Columbia Canal.

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Marion Co. issues RFP for art at planned memorial park

Visual artist sought for Sen. Clementa Pinckney Memorial Park

Submission deadline:
  • Postmark by Friday, Dec. 20, 2019
  • OR Hand deliver by Friday, Dec. 20, 2019, 5:30 p.m.

Vision

Clementa Carlos “Clem” Pinckney (July 30, 1973 – June 17, 2015) was a Democratic member of the South Carolina Senate, representing the 45th District from 2000 until his death in 2015. He was previously a member of the South Carolina House of Representatives from 1997 through 2000. Pinckney was a senior pastor at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston. On June 17, 2015, Pinckney was murdered in a racially motivated mass shooting at an evening Bible study at Mother Emanuel A.M.E. in Charleston. This act of terrorism became the catalyst for South Carolina Legislature to enact legislation to remove the Confederate flag from flying in front of the South Carolina State House. Today the Clementa C. Pinckney Foundation and The Reverend Pinckney Scholarship Fund continue the works of “Clem” by supporting the spiritual, educational and emotional health of those in need. The Senator Clementa Pinckney Memorial Park shall serve as a memorial to the late Senator as a place of reflection, remembrance and a place of acceptance to all members of our shared society.

Design Elements

The Marion County Administration seeks to commission a free-standing outdoor work of art or installation to add to the beautification, redevelopment, and regeneration of downtown Marion. The work selected must be completed and fully installed by mid-2020. The selected work must be site-specific and constructed of weather-resistant materials.

Eligibility

This opportunity is open to visual artists, ages 18 and older.

The Site

In mid-2020, the planned location for the park will be constructed between the Marion County Museum and the Marion County Council on Aging. The project will be a Marion County Park with a design that calls for a ¼-mile meandering walking path/trail, an open-air picnic structure, shade trees surrounding the large open lawn space, and ample parking. This projected site is in the heart of downtown Marion SC. The residents, business owners, and customers, and tourists can use the park for community events, walking, and jogging. The Senator Clementa Pinckney Memorial Park will create opportunities to encourage new and existing small business owners and entrepreneurs to invest in the Historic Downtown Marion Area. This space will be a venue for festivals, outdoor concerts, weddings, and local activities which will create new jobs. The project will offer opportunities built on new alliances, new partnerships, and a new understanding of the intersection of culture, community, equity, and economic development. Collaborate with HMRA to bring new businesses downtown, filling empty properties and to help existing businesses grow.

The Artist Selection Process

Semi-finalists will be selected by a panel consisting of representatives from The Arts Council of Marion County, Marion Museum, Historic Marion Revitalization Association, SC and private businesses. Semifinalists will be invited to submit more detailed applications, including scale drawings for review by the aforementioned panel. The panel will make a recommendation to the Board of Directors as to which proposal should be selected. Final Selection Criteria will be based on:
  • Artistic merit
  • Appropriateness to the site
  • Feasibility
  • Durability (appropriate for heavily used, outdoor site)
Required Application Materials In response to this RFP, applicants must submit the following:
  • Completed and signed cover sheet/certification form
  • Digital portfolio:
    • A link to a professional website or a jump drive with 10 digital images and title lists.
    • Artwork must be clearly labeled with the artist’s name, date of completion, materials and dimensions.
  • A written description of the proposed work (no more than one page)
  • Preliminary drawing of the proposed work (dimensions not to exceed 18” x 24”)
  • Proposed budget
  • Timeline for the project
  • Current biography and curriculum vitae (CV)
  • Names and contact information of two references (email and phone)
    • listing of commissioned and installed work in public or private collections completed within the last 10 years.
    • provide proof of insurance.
    • after ten years we are not obligated to keep the artwork.
    • the total cost of the project must not exceed $50,000

Budget

$50,000 for the total project including the artist’s commission, design, materials, fabrication, transportation, and installation.

Deadline for Submission

[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="150"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] All submissions must be postmarked on 12/20/2019 or hand-delivered by 5:30 p.m. Mail to:

Marion County Administration 2523 East Hwy 76 Marion, SC 29571

Please note that applications will not be accepted by fax or email. All artists will be notified of the selection results by 1/31/2020. Installation to be completed by August 2020. Submissions can be hand-delivered to:

Marion County Administration 2523 East Hwy 76, Room 114D Marion, SC 29571 Link to image or image attached.


For more information

Willena Rembert Project Manager 2523 East Hwy 76 Marion, SC 29571 843.275.6072 wrembert@marionsc.org

Take a tour and hear the story behind Seeing Spartanburg in A New Light

If you haven't yet toured Spartanburg's public art exhibition, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light, here's your chance to do so and get the inside scoop from the creative team behind the project. The Chapman Cultural Center is hosting a two-day celebration of Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light beginning February 16 with a panel discussion and Q&A featuring the creative team involved with the project. The program continues February 17 with a tour by trolley of all nine installations, led by project artist Erwin Redl, and concludes with a presentation and reception back at the Chapman Cultural Center. Guests can take advantage of a discounted rate at the Spartanburg Marriott, conveniently located across the street from the Chapman Cultural Center. There will also be access to other local cultural institutions and exhibitions. One of four recipients of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light is a large-scale public art exhibition that features nine original artworks by renown light and media artist Erwin Redl installed throughout 10 neighborhoods in Spartanburg. This project is an unprecedented partnership between Spartanburg's Chapman Cultural Center, Mayor Junie White, and the Police Department to use public art as a platform for building stronger relationships between local residents and police officers. Please RSVP by February 10, 2017 to Renee Denton at info@seeingspartanburg.com or (864) 278-9685. Via: Chapman Cultural Center

Mauldin Public Art Trail – call to South Carolina artists

[caption id="attachment_29595" align="alignright" width="300"]Mauldin Public Art 2016 Public Art Trail selection - Palmetto with Flowers by Jamie von Herndon[/caption] The City of Mauldin’s Office of Cultural Affairs is seeking submissions for the 2017 Mauldin Public Art Trail installation at the Mauldin Cultural Center. This annual program seeks to beautify the community with public art displays created by South Carolina artists. This year’s theme will be “Appreciation of Diversity” in recognition of the diverse cultural groups that came through South Carolina in the past to create today’s diverse demographics. The work should highlight diversity in a positive and unifying manner. The Public Art Trail lines the perimeter of the outdoor amphitheater at the Mauldin Cultural Center. A new work will be commissioned each year to fill the nine pre-approved sites along the perimeter. All nine sites will be filled within 10 years. For each year after the first 10 years, the oldest artwork will be replaced, resulting in a new slate of nine pieces of artwork every 10 years. Retired artworks will be relocated to other areas around the community. The City has opened a Request for Qualifications and Application at www.mauldinculturalcenter.org for interested artists. Artists, and all members of their team if applicable, must be residents of South Carolina during the duration of the project. The deadline for submission is February 27. The selection committee will choose two finalists, who will then be asked to develop conceptual designs. The final artist will be selected by mid- to late-April and given no more than 12 months for project completion, but with a target of a mid-December installation. Total budget for the annual program is not to exceed $15,000 and must be inclusive of fabrication, artist fees, and installation. The program is a partnership with the Mauldin Cultural Council, a nonprofit organization that supports the Office of Cultural Affairs. The Mauldin Cultural Council will lead the selection process with City input and present one artist and design for final approval. Contact the Office of Cultural Affairs at (864) 335-4862 with any questions.

Call for public art proposals: City of Anderson Church Street Heritage Project

Anderson Call for Art Proposal deadline: January 30 The Anderson Arts Center and the City of Anderson are requesting proposals from qualified individuals to support the public art phase of the Church Street Heritage Project. An outdoor public art display will be located in the park commemorating the once thriving business community of black entrepreneurs on Church Street in downtown Anderson. This call is open to professional artists with experience working on public art projects and creating site-specific works. Selection for this project will be made by a panel including stakeholders, design professionals, a City representative, and members of the arts community. The panel will look at the merit of the artist’s work, past experience at completing projects on time and within budget, and appropriateness and maintenance requirements of the proposed concept. The panel will also consider artists who can demonstrate sensitivity to the site and surroundings. Artists must be able to commit and effectively work within the project timeline and collaborate with the Arts Center and administration. The total artist's fee for the project is $75,000. This amount must cover all associated costs including design, materials, fabrication, travel, insurance coverage, shipping and installation. Request for qualifications and proposals deadline is January 30, 2017 at 11:59 pm (Mountain Time Zone). Read the complete guidelines and find out to submit a proposal. Via: Anderson Arts Center

Winthrop grad touts “fantastic” public arts plan for Rock Hill roundabout

From the Rock Hill Herald Article by David Thackham

[caption id="attachment_28428" align="alignleft" width="150"]brandyscholl Brandy Scholl[/caption] In truth, Brandy Scholl got her inspiration from a real-life case of #ThrowbackThursday.
Inspired by a photograph of an old buggy car and a visit to a renovated fabrics manufacturer, the recent Winthrop University graduate brainstormed and designed an intricate public arts project that may adorn the city’s new roundabout by next summer. “It’s a little surreal,” said Scholl, who designed the top concept of her class earlier this spring. “I’m still wrapping my head around the idea that I came up with this out of my head, and now it’s actually being built into this community. Being welcomed... as an artist, it’s the most gratifying thing you could possibly imagine.” Scholl, who now works as a self-employed artist in Greenville, laid out her plan in front of the Rock Hill Economic Development Corp. on Tuesday afternoon. The idea is to create what she calls a “sensory experience” by decorating the four outside edges of the roundabout circle with flowers and plants which would be adapted to each season. The effect uses the entire space and gives drivers a better visual experience as they make their way around to their exit, says Scholl. The art is funded through a portion of a $50,000 grant the city received last summer from the National Endowment for the Arts. The design drew rave reviews from David Lawrence, project manager for the Knowledge Park project, which lies close to the incoming roundabout. “I think it’s fantastic,” said Lawrence. “It’s a new gateway entering that direction, with everything heading into Knowledge Park. It’s a unique idea, and I hope it’s as colorful as her images.” Scholl’s design includes use of 10 3x3 concrete discs, carved with themes around the city, which will be placed in the ground for pedestrians to step on in between the plants. Construction on the roundabout is going smoothly, says Lawrence, and the site should be open again within the next six months. Once that starts, workers will be able to start laying in Scholl’s design. She’ll present her concept in front of the Rock Hill City Council next month for final approval. It took Scholl nearly three months to fully draw out her plans and put together her concept, which was deemed the best in her class at a board review. She was most inspired by a trip to the Springs Creative textile building on Chatham Ave., where she saw huge rolls of fabric in the warehouse. She also drew parallels from an old archive photo of a vintage Anderson motor buggy from the Rock Hill Buggy Company. “I had three posters of this traffic design hanging up all over my space alone, and I kept seeing a spinning, central part of it,” said Scholl. “That’s where the creation came from.” Although it’ll likely be about 8 to 9 months before she’s able to see the fruits of her labor, Scholl said she’s proud to see that her work has been appreciated. “The more you research, the more you know what you have,” she said. “Just getting to learn about Rock Hill’s history, that I didn’t know about, that was great.”