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Edgefield County pottery studio seeks new members

Get fired up.


Ridge Clay Arts is a new pottery studio located in Johnston. The studio currently has spaces available for new members who need a studio in which to create pottery. Studio memberships provide a shared space in which to create, a happy pottery community, kilns, glazes, slab rollers, pottery wheels and tools. Our studio also has a gallery that members can sell their wares, as well as an online store. Interested experienced potters can call the studio for more information: 803.334.7060.

Tuning Up: SCAC fellow’s new play to debut + Camden gallery’s season opens

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


SCAC fellowship recipient to debut new play. “Boy About Ten” will debut Aug. 17 and run until Aug. 25 on the Thigpen Main Stage at Columbia’s Trustus Theatre. It is playwright Dr. Jon Tuttle's sixth world premier at Trustus, where he is resident playwright. Tuttle received the SCAC's fellowship for playwriting in 2000. Read more on "Boy About Ten" and Tuttle from the Morning News/SC Now. Bassett Gallery opens new season. "Tuning Up" is happy for a quick check-in just up U.S. 1 in Camden, where grantee the Fine Arts Center is set to open the 2018/2019 Bassett Gallery season on Thursday night. Camden artist Dot Goodwin's exhibition "Life with HeART" is first up. Spartanburg 1 touts ABC Project grants. Spartanburg School District 1 scored the largest percentage of ABC — Arts in Basic Curriculum — grant funding of any district in the state, according to the Herald-Journal. The total amount headed to the district is $67,000 distributed among seven district schools. Thanks for promoting your grant!
[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="251"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] ICYMI: Calling all potters! The Macon (Ga.) Arts Alliance would like to share with you Fired Works 2019 Regional Ceramics Exhibition and Sale featuring 60 potters from Georgia and the Southeast to be held April 5-14, 2019 in ... Macon, Georgia. The entry fee and exhibition are free to the exhibitors. Get, ahem, fired up! Hard details here. Let's show them what #SCArtists can do! (The deadline is Dec. 1, so we'll remind you once or twice between now and then.)

Tuning Up: Theatre company grants + call for potters + PAE

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Theatre company grant opportunities. Southeastern Theatre Conference is offering two grants for non-academic professional theatre companies – one for current SETC organizational members and one for non-member organizations. Applications for 2018/2019 grants are being accepted from now through Aug. 3, 2018. Click here for more information. [caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="251"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] Calling all potters! The Macon (Ga.) Arts Alliance would like to share with you Fired Works 2019 Regional Ceramics Exhibition and Sale featuring 60 potters from Georgia and the Southeast to be held April 5-14, 2019 in ... Macon, Georgia. The entry fee and exhibition are free to the exhibitors. Get, ahem, fired up! Hard details here. Let's show them what #SCArtists can do! (The deadline is Dec. 1, so we'll remind you once or twice between now and then.) Performing Arts Exchange. The early-bird registration deadline for South Arts' Performing Arts Exchange (Oct. 1-4, Orlando, Fla.) is a week away. They've got a solid Juried Showcase lineup, and are adding a folk and traditional arts American Sounds showcase. Don't miss out!

Making art to feed the hungry: Hub City Empty Bowls 2016

Hub City Empty BowlsHub City Empty Bowls is gearing up for Soup Day, its annual arts-based fundraiser to feed hungry people in Spartanburg County. Each year, the public is invited to make the hand-crafted pottery bowls that are featured on Soup Day. Three bowl-making events are scheduled:

  • Saturday, July 16, 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m. in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center
  • Thursday, July 21, 6-8:30 p.m. at West Main Artists Co-Op
  • Saturday, Aug. 27, 10 a.m.-noon and 1-3 p.m. in Spartanburg Art Museum’s studios at Chapman Cultural Center.
These free, family-friendly events provide the experience of working with clay at any level of experience, including no experience. The clay, facilities, and instruction are all donated. Members of Carolina Clay Artists and volunteers will be on hand to instruct participants in bowl-making techniques. “People look forward to our bowl-making events every year,” said Nancy Williamson, publicity leader for Carolina Clay Artists. “I see some of the same faces and families come back each year. It’s fun, easy, creative, free, and, of course, it is for a good cause. I am truly amazed at some of the raw talent I see. Even more amazing is to see all the finished bowls laid out on Soup Day for the public to take home. It’s almost like an art exhibit – a huge art exhibit with every color of the rainbow and shape imaginable.” Soup Day takes place Oct. 15 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Chapman Cultural Center. For every $15 donation, a donor gets to keep a bowl of his or her choice and enjoy a simple meal of soup, bread, and tea. Patrons can enjoy soup donated by some of the best restaurants in Spartanburg, listen to live music and share in the fellowship of helping to feed local citizens. A silent auction of donated items and a drum circle are part of the event. TOTAL Ministries will receive the proceeds to help feed the needy in Spartanburg County. Last year’s campaign allowed Hub City Empty Bowls to make an all-time high donation of $26,000 to TOTAL Ministries. Empty Bowls was started by a high school teacher in Michigan in 1990 as a student project to help feed the needy and has grown into an international phenomenon. There are hundreds of Empty Bowls projects around the world, raising millions of dollars to feed the hungry. Each Empty Bowls organization is independent and self-governed. 2016 marks the eighth year that Carolina Clay Artists has spearheaded the Spartanburg effort. Thus far, this year’s sponsors are Spartanburg Regional Foundation Healing Arts Fund, Carolina Clay Artists, West Main Artists Co-Op, Action Printing, Milliken & Company, Wheresville Productions, Chapman Cultural Center, Spartanburg Art Museum, and Chris Williams. The project is seeking more sponsors: companies and individuals willing to donate funds; restaurants to donate soup, bread, and tea; other businesses to donate eating utensils; individuals and businesses to donate silent auction items; and potters to make the bowls. Those willing to donate should contact Traci Kennedy at Director@TotalMinistries.org or (864) 585-9167. For more information about TOTAL Ministries, visit TotalMinistries.org. Hub City Empty Bowls, a component fund of the Spartanburg County Foundation, was established to increase awareness about the issues of hunger and food insecurity and to help local organizations fight hunger. For more information, visit HubCityEmptyBowls.com or Hub City Empty Bowls on Facebook. Via: Hub City Empty Bowls  

All levels of ability and experience welcome at 2016 S.C. Clay Conference

Registration deadline is Feb. 5. SC Clay ConferenceMaking Clay Personal is the theme of the second annual South Carolina Clay Conference, taking place Feb, 26-28, 2016, at the Newberry Firehouse Conference Center in Newberry, S.C. Presenters Michael Sherrill, Glenda E. Guion and Bill Griffith will take attendees through the journey of creating objects in clay that are uniquely personal and expressive of the individual artist. All levels of ability and experience are invited to attend. “I hope that the topic of making clay personal will open a dialogue about sorting out what is important to the clay artist when, at times, the choices seem endless,” says Guion. “We are bombarded with visual images and fragmented thoughts on a daily basis, either through our physical experiences or the new 'virtual realities.' Regardless of the clay material resources or the artist experience, trusting your gut instincts to develop a personal visual language for your work can be the most challenging part of creating the work.” Sherrill and Guion will take the stage on Friday and Saturday to demonstrate their work while interacting with attendees, answering questions and offering inspiration for finding a personal clay voice. On Sunday, Griffith will introduce attendees to the personal journeys of many well-known clay artists. “As makers, we often can reach a point when we become disengaged with our work and feel a need to change technically or aesthetically using new materials, forms and or content,” says Griffith. “Why and when does this occur and how and where do we find inspiration and motivation to make this meaningful shift? My lecture will include images and testimonials from several well-known ceramic artists who have experienced this transition, along with their personal thoughts and perhaps some helpful suggestions." The conference is presented by the Newberry Arts Center, which is a part of the City of Newberry Parks, Recreation and Tourism Department. “Our goal in having a yearly conference is to bring together clay artists and potters from across South Carolina in an effort to build a stronger clay community," says conference organizer Marquerite Palmer. "By joining together once a year, we gain knowledge from collaborative conversations, share upcoming workshop information statewide, and discuss individual challenges and successes. Through interaction, communication and education, we hope to move clay forward for the benefit of all S.C. clay artists and potters.” All conference attendees, amateur and professional, are encouraged to bring pottery and sculpture to sell at the 2016 S.C. Clay Conference Pottery Sale. The sale is open to the public and advertised throughout the state. A small percentage of sales is used to support the Newberry Arts Center and the conference. Art work from this year’s presenters will also be available for sale. Some of Newberry’s top restaurants will provide food for meals, the reception and the Saturday night barbecue. Coffee, drinks, snacks and more are also included in the registration fee. Several vendors will be displaying their pottery-related items as well as offering demonstrations and information. Registration is $225 for attendees and $125 for students. For more information and or to register, visit www.southcarolinaclayconference.com or contact Marquerite Palmer, mpalmer@cityofnewberry.com, (803) 321-1015. The South Carolina Clay Conference’s purpose is to assist in the growth and direction of South Carolina potters through presentation, demonstration, and networking opportunities. Conference organziers seek to create a flourishing clay community in the state of South Carolina, with the aspiration to move clay forward. Via: S.C. Clay Conference  

Exhibition opportunities for fine artists and photographers during North Charleston Arts Festival

The 2015 North Charleston Arts Festival, taking place May 1-9, offers excellent exhibition opportunities for fine artists and photographers ages 18 and up, including the annual North Charleston Arts Festival Art Walk and Judged Fine Art and Photography Competitions & Exhibitions. The Art Walk, set for Wednesday, May 6, in the Olde Village area of North Charleston, provides a fun and casual setting for artists to both display and sell their work. Entries for the judged competitions may compete for ribbons and cash prizes and will be on display throughout the festival at the Charleston Area Convention Center Complex, located at 5001 Coliseum Drive in North Charleston. Complete details and entry instructions for all exhibition opportunities are available for download at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply. Art Walk Local fine artists, fine craft artisans, photographers, and sculptors are invited to exhibit and sell their original works during the Arts Festival's Art Walk. From 5 - 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May 6, paintings, photography, pottery, jewelry, sculpture, and more in a full range of styles will be displayed along the sidewalks and within a number of local businesses and restaurants in the Olde Village area of North Charleston. Other Art Walk offerings include live music, art demos, and kid’s activities, creating a festive evening of art and culture for the whole family to enjoy. Artists are selected to participate in the Art Walk through a juried application process. There is no fee to apply. Sales of originals, prints, notecards, and other small works are welcome and selected artists may also offer their own original brochures, business cards, and supplemental handouts. Display screens can be furnished by the Cultural Arts Department at no charge to assist the artist in presenting his/her work. Display equipment for 3D artwork is available on a limited basis. The deadline for submission of applications for the Art Walk is April 20, 2015. Applications may be emailed to culturalarts@northcharleston.org, mailed to the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at PO Box 190016, North Charleston, SC 29419, or hand-delivered to the Cultural Arts office on the 2nd floor of North Charleston City Hall, located at 2500 City Hall Lane in North Charleston. Judged Fine Art Competition & Exhibition Fine artists are invited to enter original work into the annual North Charleston Arts Festival Judged Fine Art Competition & Exhibition and compete for cash prizes totaling up to $4,675. Submissions are accepted in five categories: acrylic, oil, drawing/pastel, watercolor, and mixed media. Awards will be at the sole discretion of the judge, Wim Roefs, an independent curator, author, art consultant, exhibition designer, and owner of The if ART Gallery in Columbia, SC. Roefs is the chairman of the board of Columbia's 701 Center for Contemporary Art (701 CCA) and was the organization's founding volunteer executive director from 2008-2013. He chairs the curatorial team for 701 CCA and has curated dozens of exhibitions for his own gallery and art institutions throughout South Carolina and beyond. Fine art entries will be accepted at the Charleston Area Convention Center on Wednesday and Thursday, April 29 and 30, from noon to 7 p.m., as well as Friday, May 1, from 9 a.m. to noon. Artists may enter any combination of categories with a maximum of four entries in one or more categories. A non-refundable fee of $10 per entry is due at drop-off. Judged Photography Competition and Exhibition Professional and amateur photographers are invited to enter original prints into the annual North Charleston Arts Festival Judged Photography Competition & Exhibition and compete for cash prizes totaling up to $2,175. Submissions will be accepted in the Professional/Advanced division or Amateur division under the categories of color, monochrome, or digitally enhanced. Judging and awards will be based on the Photographic Society of America Print Guidelines. Three competent judges in the field of photography will score entries using the 3-9 range of scores. Each judge will evaluate each entry as a whole, considering the areas of impact, composition, and technique. However, there is no specific weighting or allotment of points for each category. This system is used efficiently and effectively by many arts councils, at international exhibitions, and by camera clubs. It allows an adequate qualitative separation of entries while lessening the potential for a large number of the higher scoring entries having identical scores. In the event of a tie-breaker, judges will choose the winning entry. Photography entries will be accepted at the Charleston Area Convention Center on Wednesday and Thursday, April 29 and 30, from noon to 7 p.m. Artists may enter any combination of categories with a maximum of four entries in one or more categories. A non-refundable fee of $5 per entry is due at drop-off. The Judged Fine Art and Photography Exhibitions are free and open to the public throughout the North Charleston Arts Festival. Viewing times are Saturday, May 2, 10 a.m.–4 p.m.; Sunday, May 3, 2 –5 p.m.; Monday through Friday, May 4-8, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.; and Saturday, May 9, 9 a.m. – noon. Awards for 1st place, 2nd place, 3rd place, and Honorable Mentions in each division and category for both the Judged Fine Art and Judged Photography Competitions will be announced at an artist reception on Friday, May 1, from 6 - 7 p.m. at the Charleston Area Convention Center. Musical entertainment will be provided by David Archer and Abe White and the public is welcome to attend. The North Charleston Arts Festival, scheduled May 1-9, is one of the most comprehensive arts festivals in the state, providing thousands of residents and visitors with an array of nearly 200 performances, exhibitions, and activities. The Main Event, held May 2 and 3 at the North Charleston Performing Arts Center and Charleston Area Convention Center, offers free admission and parking to more than 40 performances on four stages, exhibitions, a gem and mineral show, an antique show, children’s activities, art and crafts booths, and a food courtyard. The Arts Festival continues with free and moderately priced ticketed events throughout the week at various locations and concludes with fireworks over the Cooper River at the Grand Finale at North Charleston Riverfront Park. For more information about the North Charleston Arts Festival, or to download the Art Walk application or entry instructions for the Judged Fine Art and Photography Competitions & Exhibitions, visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com. For more information about other exhibition opportunities offered by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website, northcharleston.org, or call 843-740-5854. Via: City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department

First South Carolina Clay Conference open to potters and clay artists

Registration due by Feb. 20. South Carolina potters and clay artists are invited to register for the first ever South Carolina Clay Conference: Moving Clay Forward. This three-day statewide conference will be held Feb.27 - March 1 at the Newberry Arts Center, 1107 College Street in Newberry, South Carolina. Conference presenters are Sue Grier from Asheville, North Carolina, and Mike Vatalaro from Greenville, South Carolina. Both artists will demonstrate their talents and techniques and have their work for sale. Modeled after well-known clay conferences in North Carolina and Alabama, the conference will allow for presenters and attendees to be immersed in conversation on all things clay. Activities include a Friday evening reception and Saturday evening barbecue. Sunday morning, the conference will close with an informative lecture on a clay-related topic. Professionals, educators, amateurs and students can all enjoy the creative atmosphere permitted by an intimate gathering. “The conference demonstrations will be broadly focused on the approach and techniques I’ve used to advance my work over the years,” explains Vatalaro. “These include throwing techniques and considerations used for generating lidded and covered vessels as well as how focusing on pottery proportions can help generate better pottery form. I also want to share how historical pottery forms have inspired my work and how these forms can uniquely inspire each individual's approach and work.” Attendees are encouraged to bring five pieces of their work to be sold or displayed at the conference. A commission of 20 percent will go back to Newberry Arts Center. Attendees may sign up for a brief critique of their work by one of the presenters at no extra charge. The deadline for registration is February 20. Registration is $225 and limited to 50 participants.  Find more information or register online. Via: Newberry Arts Center

Visual artists and fine craft artisans invited to apply for annual Co-Op Gallery

Applications are now being accepted from visual artists and fine craft artisans for participation in The Meeting Place Art and Fine Craft Co-Op, an annual, temporary artist-run gallery coordinated by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department and presented as a component of the North Charleston Arts Festival. The Co-Op is dedicated to presenting many artists of varied backgrounds working in a diverse array of media and representing a full range of styles. Eligible applicants include South Carolina artists, ages 18 and up, creating original fine art, fine crafts, photography, pottery, jewelry, fiber art, glass, sculpture and more. There is no fee to apply. Applications can be found online at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply. Deadline for applications is Monday, March 3, 2014. The Meeting Place Art and Fine Craft Co-Op Gallery is located at 1077 East Montague Avenue in the Olde Village area of North Charleston. Operating hours are Fridays and Saturdays, April 4 through May 31, 2014, and are overseen by participating artists. A free, public reception will be held at the gallery during the North Charleston Arts Festival Art Walk on Wednesday, May 7, from 5-8 p.m. The 2014 North Charleston Arts Festival is scheduled for May 2-10. The nine-day celebration of arts and culture provides more than 30,000 residents and visitors with an array of performances, exhibitions and activities. The Main Event, held the first weekend in May, offers free admission and parking to over 40 performances on four themed stage stages: General Audience, Cultural Heritage, Youth Entertainment, and Bands. Other Main Event activities include judged art and photography shows, the S.C. Palmetto Hands Juried Fine Craft Exhibit, a gem & mineral show, an antique show, children's activities, art and craft booths, and a food courtyard. The Arts Festival continues with more than 60 events and exhibitions throughout the week at various locations. An array of free and ticketed offerings include street dances, concerts, theater presentations, film screenings, an art walk, children’s programs, workshops and demonstrations, a National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition, and much more. The festival concludes with the Grand Finale at North Charleston Riverfront Park featuring performances by professional groups and Tri-county schools, children's activities, and fireworks over the Cooper River. For more information, contact the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at (843) 740-5854, email culturalarts@northcharleston.org, or visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com. Via: North Charleston Cultural Arts Department

For Myrtle Beach artist, grant is not just about the money

Artist Lisa Blayton received a South Carolina Arts Commission quarterly grant for professional development and participanted in the recent Artists U gathering. The next quarterly grant deadline is Feb. 15, 2014. From Horry Independent News:

It wasn’t just about the money. Getting a financial award is always nice, said Lisa Blayton, a porcelain artist who lives in Waterford Plantation. But the generous grant she got from the South Carolina Arts Commission and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund was about more than the dollars. “What was really important was that someone thought my art was special enough to support it,” she said. This wasn’t the first grant Blayton, who’s studied under artists from Japan, Brazil, Mexico, Venezuela, Germany and the United States, has gotten. But this one took her to Nashville, Tenn for a three-day conference with 120 other artists. Blayton and her husband Kevin, a city engineer in North Myrtle Beach, have four adult sons. The four pottery artists who demonstrated and discussed their skills were each women over 50 who made Blayton feel as if they were talking to her personally. “It was exciting to see the porcelain that was being created by these women, and to see them all being successful at their age,” Blayton said. It was encouraging, she said, because there are times when she feels like she’s getting a late start. With her children grown, she described herself as being on ‘Lisa time’ right now. “I feel like I’ve graduated, I don’t have to cook monster meals for four boys and a husband, we’re not on a rigid schedule and I have more time for art now.” Her home studio is filled with her favorite things including hats that had been her grandmother’s, a nutcracker that belonged to her father, and a walking stick her grandfather used. Being among those treasures helps the artist relax and think creatively. With more time than she used to have for her art, she’ll often spend two or three days a week painting, and then “do nothing” for a couple weeks. She actually makes her own porcelain, using cotton fabric and liquid clay called ‘slip.’ Blayton said she probably wouldn’t have attended the Altered Approach to Clay Conference in August, had it not been for the financial grant she was given. “The conference had nothing to do with painting, but everything to do with pottery,” she said. Blayton, a native South Carolinian with a business degree from Clemson, left the banking industry years ago to paint. For her last banking job, which involved audit work, she interviewed in an orange suit. Two weeks later, her boss asked her to wear pinstriped or navy blue suits to work. The artist, who loves color, knew then that banking would not be her life’s work. Her art, which she sells through Inlet Queens consignment shop in Murrells Inlet, is. In addition to creating art, she’s also teaching it to a 14-year-old girl. “Like most artists, I started with florals, but this little girl doesn’t like flowers so we’re doing animals and started with a frog,” she laughed. Blayton said that involves “the same artistic principles for composition and design and color tones, but you get a real different aspect when you have to learn chemical reactions and firing. “So,” she added, “it’s a little bit of science and a little bit of physics when it comes to loading the kiln. “We even incorporate history, so it’s a very comprehensive class. It’s not just about artistic skill.” Blayton will attend Artists U in Charleston, one of 30 artists chosen from 70 state applicants. That seminar will not be about a specific art form, but about what Blayton called ‘the business of art.’ “It will help with marketing and business strategies geared to artists. “We don’t have a whole lot of inventory and sometimes we’re thought of as a luxury as opposed to stores that sell shirts or pants,” she said. The artist is all trying to start an after-school art program at Trinity Christian School where she sometimes substitutes. Sounds like ‘Lisa time’ is filling up.

Groundhog kilns: firing pottery the traditional way

This Aiken Standard article spotlights the groundhog kiln - a wood-burning furnace used by some potters in Aiken and Edgefield counties that are similar to the ones that were around in the 1800s. (Story and photos by DeDe Biles. View additional photos.) Images: Left - master potter Justin Guy of Old Edgefield Pottery adds wood to the fire in the groundhog kiln owned by the Edgefield County Historical Society. Right - These face jugs and other pieces made by potter Gary Dexter were fired in the groundhog kiln at Gaston Livery Stable.

In an era when high-tech gadgets are all the rage, groundhog kilns remind us of the way things used to be. The wood-burning furnaces used by some potters in Aiken and Edgefield counties today are similar to the ones that were around in the 1800s. “It's the traditional way of making pottery down here in the South,” said Gary Dexter, who built the groundhog kiln at Gaston Livery Stable, a historic barn on Richland Avenue, in 2012. Dexter, who has been a potter for approximately 17 years, focuses on creating old-style, alkaline-glazed stoneware. He fashions pots, face jugs and other pieces from a mixture of two types of clay that he digs himself. Then he fires them in the Livery Stable's groundhog kiln. “It's like a giant chimney that has been laid down on the ground,” Dexter said. “It's about 7 feet wide by 14 feet long. There is a fire box on one end and a short chimney around 5 feet tall on the other.” The kiln is made of refractory bricks that can withstand high temperatures. Dexter placed dirt and rocks along the sides of the kiln to hold it together. “It's kind of partially buried in the ground, and it looks like a groundhog's burrow,” he said. The kiln can hold 150 pieces of pottery. The clay they are made of hardens during the firing process, when the temperature inside the furnace rises to more than 2,000 degrees. Meanwhile, the glazes on the pottery melt and become shiny. “I use pine wood, and the firing usually takes about 30 hours,” Dexter said. “Then it takes about four days for the kiln to cool down.” Gaston Livery Stable is in the process of being restored, and the kiln “will be one of the anchors we are going to have here,” Dexter said. “As the restoration moves forward, we will have living history days when people will be making crafts and other things from back in the time when this barn was built, which was 1893.” Dexter has a pottery studio at Gaston Livery Stable, and his apprentice, Siva Aiken, works there with him. The Edgefield County Historical Society owns a groundhog kiln located near the intersection of U.S. 25 and S.C. 430. It is bigger than Gaston Livery Stable's furnace. “Ours is 22 feet long and about 8 feet wide in the middle,” said Master Potter Justin Guy of Old Edgefield Pottery. “We have 90 cubic feet to fill up, and we can put between 250 and 300 pots inside. But we've found that the kiln fires better if we put in fewer and strategically place the pots.” The kiln has been operating since 2011. “We built it in six to eight weeks,” Guy said. “It's made of High-Fired Super Duty bricks (which have a temperature rating between 3,000 and 3,150 degrees).”