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Tuning Up: #SCartists in the news

Good morning! 

"Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...
  Cecil Williams might have a Governor's Award for lifetime achievement, but he sure isn't slowing down. This Times & Democrat story goes into great detail on a new wall art series of his works. Moments of Grace – The South Carolina History That Changed America tells the story of African Americans’ fight for equal rights over decades:

Using his skills in photography, art, and computer graphics, the 84-year-old started the series in 1999. He has just completed 60 of what will be a series of 100 images that depict the state’s history, culture and heritage and how it all intertwines with African Americans’ fight for justice and equality.

Go check it out. Video included! From an award recipient to an SCAC fellowship recipient we go! Per a release from Clemson University comes news on Valerie Zimany (Craft Fellow, 2020): "Professor Valerie Zimany, chair of the Clemson University Department of Art, was one of ten U.S. artists inducted into the International Academy of Ceramics in 2021. Zimany was nominated by members of Japan, the United Kingdom and the United States. Candidates elected by the Council will be introduced during the 2022 General Assembly in Geneva by the President of the Academy." Read more from the College of Arts, Architecture, and the Humanities here.

Jason Rapp

Innovate Grants calls for visual artists, photographers

$550 grants available

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Thursday, March 24, 2022

Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one visual artist and one photographer.

In addition, (4) honorable mentions (2 in art and 2 in photo), will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. Innovate Grant's commitment extends beyond the grant cycle by promoting the work of selected winners and honorable mentions into the future. For more information and to apply visit https://innovateartistgrants.org. Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that. How to Apply: Visual Artists and Photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org Recent Innovate Grant recipients:
  • Mahsa Merci Toronto, Canada Fall Grant Recipient – Art
  • Arielle Gray New Haven, CT Fall Grant Recipient – Photography
  • Joanna Wierzbicka Switzerland Summer Grant Recipient – Art
  • Joseph Rovegno New York, NY Summer Grant Recipient – Photography
Explore the work of ALL Past Innovate Grant recipients and read their interviews at https://innovateartistgrants.org Category: Multiple disciplines and genres accepted Deadline: March 24, 2022 Region: US & International Awards: $550.00 USD Grants Apply online today: https://innovateartistgrants.org

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Fundraising partnership features works by homeless photographers

'Through Our Eyes Project' comes to Columbia

[caption id="attachment_48225" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Provided photo. Click to enlarge.[/caption]

Hundreds of images taken by homeless photographers will soon be on display at Columbia's Koger Center, the centerpiece of an exhibit designed to raise awareness and money for local organizations that serve them.

People experiencing homelessness often cite a feeling of being invisible. Founded in 2016 by Spartanburg pastor and avid photographer Jason Williamson, Through Our Eyes Project (TOEP) gives homeless people a voice by allowing them to document their everyday lives with disposable cameras. The photos are then curated into an exhibit that celebrates the photographers and provides a personal view of homelessness that few have ever seen. TOEP has had successful runs in other South Carolina cities such as Boiling Springs, Greenville, and Spartanburg and extended to other states: Alaska, Massachusetts, and neighboring North Carolina. Williamson reflected on previous experiences: “The things that are always surprising is the amount of joy that a lot of people have—whether it’s a pet they’ve adopted, a child, or a friend. There’s a lot of joy, and that’s the part of the project that really caught me off guard,” he said. “We like to say that the cameras are disposable, but the people are not.” TOEP typically partners with host churches to connect with relevant nonprofits as recipients of funds raised from project sponsors, opening reception ticket sales, and the general public, who can vote for their favorite photos for $1 per vote. The top three photographers who receive the most votes will receive gifts with the money raised. [caption id="attachment_48224" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Provided photo. Click to enlarge.[/caption] The Columbia project debuts with a ticketed opening reception from 5:30-7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, Nov. 3. “We’ve wanted to bring TOEP to Columbia for several years now,” said Allison Caldwell, local missions director at Shandon Baptist Church. “We’re proud to partner with Oliver Gospel, Toby’s Place, and Family Promise of the Midlands to highlight what they do for homeless men, women and children in our community, and how others can help.” Opening reception tickets are available at Shandon.org for a donation of $25 or more. Held in the Koger Center’s upstairs gallery, the reception will include hors d'oeuvres, live music, partner booths, and a first glance at the images captured by more than 30 photographers. Space is limited and advance tickets are required to attend. After Nov. 3, the exhibit will be open for free public viewing weekdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Dec. 19. For more information visit Shandon.org or contact Allison Caldwell, Shandon Local Missions Director (803.528.0740 or acaldwell@shandon.org).
Disclosure: SCAC Communications Director Jason Rapp, editor of The Hub, is an active member and current deacon of Shandon Baptist Church and volunteered on a steering group for this project. The SCAC is not a project funder. This story was a submitted news release.

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2021 Biennale makes call for artists

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Friday, March 19, 2021


Art League of Hilton Head invites artists to enter the 2021 Biennale, its 27th National Juried Exhibition, held every other year across multiple media types.

Categories include:
  • Oil
  • Acrylic
  • Pastel
  • Watermedia
  • Photography
  • Mixed Media
  • Three-Dimensional
  • and All Other
Over $5000 in cash prizes will be awarded. The deadline to enter is March 19, 2021. For further information and to enter, go to http://bit.ly/Biennale2021 All accepted works of art selected by three jurors will be on display at Art League Gallery in the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina on Hilton Head Island. This state of the art gallery provides the finest exhibit space with high tourist and community visibility. Prize winners will be chosen by 2021 Biennale judge Marc Hanson. Nationally known, award-winning artist Marc Hanson is a Master Signature Member of the Oil Painters of America (O.P.A.M.), having won numerous awards of excellence throughout his career. He has been published and featured in national art publications including on the covers of Plein Air and Southwest Art Magazine, and in the book 'Oil Painting Secrets With The Masters,' by Cindy Salaski. His work has been shown in museums and galleries throughout the United States and abroad. The 2021 Biennale exhibition will be free and open to the public from May 4-26, 2021. An opening reception and awards ceremony will take place on Friday, May 7, from 5-7 p.m.

Correction

The initial version of this post listed an incorrect start date for the Biennale.

About Art League of Hilton Head

Art League of Hilton Head is the only 501 (c) (3) nonprofit visual arts organization on Hilton Head Island with a synergistic Art Gallery and teaching Academy. For almost 50 years, Art League has been the Lowcountry's creative core for the visual arts with traditional and cutting-edge exhibitions, classes, workshops, lectures and special community art events. To learn more and for a calendar of events, visit http://bit.ly/ArtLeagueHHI.

Milly

$550.00 Innovate Grants — Call for Artists + Photographers

Submissions open for Winter '21 cycle

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 18, 2021

Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one visual artist and one photographer.

In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. Click here for more information and to apply. Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that.

How to apply

Visual artists and photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org.

Recent recipients

Explore the work of past Innovate Grant recipients and read their interviews at https://innovateartistgrants.org. Yannick Lowery Philadelphia, Pennsylvania • Fall Grant Recipient – Art Giulia Parlato Palermo, Italy • Fall Grant Recipient – Photography Bianca Barandun London + Zurich • Summer Grant Recipient – Art Torrance Hall Baltimore, Maryland • Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Kylie Lockwood Detroit, Michigan • Spring Grant Recipient – Art Lindsey Kennedy Santa Fe, New Mexico • Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Lynnea Holland Weiss Cleveland, Ohio • Winter Grant Recipient – Art Dylan Hausthor New Haven, Connecticut • Winter Grant Recipient – Photography

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$550.00 Innovate Grants: A call for artists + photographers

Innovate Grant is now accepting submissions for the Fall 2020 Cycle.

Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one Visual Artist and one Photographer. In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. For more information and to apply visit https://innovateartistgrants.org Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that. (Ed. note: These are not South Carolina Arts Commission grants. This post does not imply ownership of or endorsement of this program or grant opportunity.)

How to Apply

Visual Artists and Photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org
  • Category: Multiple disciplines and genres accepted
  • Deadline: December 10, 2020
  • Region: U.S. & International
  • Awards: $550.00 grants

Explore the work of past Innovate Grant recipients and read their interviews at https://innovateartistgrants.org Bianca Barandun London + Zurich Summer Grant Recipient – Art Torrance Hall Baltimore, MD Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Kylie Lockwood Detroit, MI Spring Grant Recipient – Art Lindsey Kennedy Santa Fe, NM Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Lynnea Holland Weiss Cleveland, OH Winter Grant Recipient – Art Dylan Hausthor New Haven, CT Winter Grant Recipient – Photography Christine Atkinson Los Angeles, CA Fall Grant Recipient – Art Brendon Kahn Dallas, TX Fall Grant Recipient – Photography Joe Hedges Pullman, WA Summer Grant Recipient – Art Leafy Yeh Los Angeles, CA Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Margaret Jacobs Enfield, NH Spring Grant Recipient – Art Ceaphas Stubbs Newark, NJ Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Taylor O. Thomas Tampa, FL Winter Grant Recipient – Art Shane Lavalette Syracuse, NY Winter Grant Recipient – Photography
 

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National call for photography submissions

$1,000 awarded to first prize

Submission deadline: Monday, September 28, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Maryland's Delaplaine Arts Center sent The Hub word of its upcoming National Juried Photography Exhibition. Submissions are being taken right now through Sept. 28. The National Juried Photography Exhibition is held biennially in November at the center as part of Focus, its month-long celebration of photography. Artists residing within the U.S. are invited to enter up to three photographs for consideration. All photographs are eligible.

Important Dates

  • September 28, 2020 • Deadline for entry submission (by 11:59 pm)
  • October 12, 2020 • Notification of accepted works (by 5 pm)
  • October 29, 2020 • Deadline for delivery of accepted works
  • November 7 – 29, 2020 • Exhibition (physical & virtual)

Awards

  • First — $1,000
  • Second — $500
  • Third — $250
  • Honorable Mention — $125

About the Juror

Regina DeLuise is a Guggenheim Fellow and full-time faculty at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work is represented in private and public collections, including Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Houston Museum of Fine Art, and the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal. She has worked at the Daniel Wolf Gallery in NYC and co-founded Elm Street Arts, a cooperative gallery in Manchester, Vermont. DeLuise is from Brooklyn, New York, and received her BFA from SUNY in Purchase, New York, and her MA from Rosary College in Florence, Italy.

Entry Guidelines

  • All photographs, black & white, color, non-silver, computer-manipulated, digital, or pinhole are eligible.
  • All photographs should have been completed by the submitting artist in the last 2 years. Accepted works should arrive ready to hang.
  • Fee — $35 per artist ($25 if artist is a current member of the Delaplaine).
  • Number of Pieces — Artists may submit up to three (3) photographs (in JPEG format) for consideration.
  • Go here to submit your artwork.

Jason Rapp

Call for Artists + Photographers: Innovate Grants

Application deadline: Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020


Innovate Grant is now accepting submissions for the Winter Cycle. Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one Visual Artist and one Photographer. In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. For more information and to apply visit https://innovateartistgrants.org. Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that.
  • Category: Multiple disciplines and genres accepted
  • Deadline: February 11, 2020
  • Region: International
  • Awards: $550.00 Grants

How to Apply

Visual Artists and Photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org.

Innovate Grant Winners

Christine Atkinson Los Angeles, CA Fall Grant Recipient – Art Brendon Kahn Dallas, TX Fall Grant Recipient – Photography Joe Hedges Pullman, WA Summer Grant Recipient – Art Leafy Yeh Los Angeles, CA Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Margaret Jacobs Enfield, NH Spring Grant Recipient – Art Ceaphas Stubbs Newark, NJ Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Taylor O. Thomas Tampa, FL Winter Grant Recipient – Art Shane Lavalette Syracuse, NY Winter Grant Recipient – PhotographyInnovat
Apply online today: https://innovateartistgntras.org

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S.C. State Parks to offer arts programs in 2019

Photography, painting to be offered throughout year

In 2019, state parks in South Carolina will offer programming that combines art, culture, heritage and ranger-guided recreational excursions to some of the state's most beautiful and significant settings. Many of the events in the series are hours-long or overnight premium experiences and can be found at www.SCParkStore.com as their registration deadlines approach. A Winter Nature Photography Workshop with renowned photographer Robert Rommel, for example, will be held Jan. 11-14 at Santee State Park. Participants will spend an entire weekend studying the art, creativity and technical aspects of nature photography, concentrating on landscape, wildlife and up-close shots. Other programs involve yoga, painting, paddling and 5K running. People who are interested in these exceptional experiences should check www.SCParkStore.com often throughout the year for registration details. You can also mark your calendars for arts programs on these dates:
  • Indigo painting at Santee State Park on March 3. The event also will be held:
    • March 19 and Sept. 17 at Devils Fork
    • Oct. 8 back at Santee
  • Watercolor journaling at Santee State Park on March 10-12
  • Watercolor painting with Amelia at Santee State Park on April 14-16
Non-arts programs include:
  • 5K runs at Sadlers Creek (Feb. 23), Hickory Knob (March 16), Huntington Beach (April 6) and Sesquicentennial (May 11).
  • Yoga in the Park with Cheryl Mason at Santee State Park on April 7-9. This weekend event also will be held Oct. 27-29 at Table Rock State Park.
  • Kayak with a Ranger at Colleton State Park on the fourth Fridays of every month beginning March 22 and ending Oct. 25.
  • Kayak with a Ranger at Givhans Ferry State Park on the first Fridays of every month beginning April 5 and ending Nov. 1.
  • Stand-Up Paddleboarding with a Ranger at Table Rock State Park on the third Friday of every month beginning May 17 and ending Oct. 18.
Fees for these premium programs range from $35 for a single-day event to $225 for an event that covers an entire weekend. Details, including when and how to register, any available discounts and how to book lodging, can be found at www.SCParkStore.com.

Photographer Cecil Williams tells students about growing up in the segregated South

[gallery ids="29482,29481,29480"] Note: The S.C. African American Heritage Foundation received an Arts in Education Project grant to help fund an artist residency featuring photographer Cecil Williams. Images above: The South Carolina Arts Commission's State Art Collection includes three works by Williams. (click on an image for larger view.) From SCNow.com Article and photo by Joe Perry

[caption id="attachment_29478" align="alignright" width="300"]Cecil Williams Cecil Williams[/caption] LAMAR, S.C. – Life under segregation in South Carolina was not easy, but Cecil Williams was there with his camera, capturing history as it was made. The 79-year-old Orangeburg native spoke on Jan. 9 to students at Lamar High School as part of a two-day residency that included a presentation that night at Black Creek Arts Council and an appearance at Mayo High School in Darlington. The residency is funded through the South Carolina African American Heritage Foundation and S.C. Arts Commission. Williams got his first camera when he was 9 years old as his brother’s interests turned to music and playing the saxophone. Williams was instantly enthralled with the Kodak “Baby Brownie,” he said, and he figured out “a little hustle” early on. With 12 exposures, he’d go to Edisto Gardens to photograph couples. Developing the film cost a dollar. “That means I would make 11 dollars,” he said, laughing. His career and subject matter, though, soon turned to how he saw the disadvantages African-Americans faced. As part of his slideshow, Williams shared photos that reached millions of people through publications such as Life and Newsweek magazines and The New York Times, while his primary employer was JET magazine. “How was it back then for African-Americans at the time?” he said. “When people, just because of the color of their skin, don’t have the same rights as other people?” Williams was chased out of the courthouse in Orangeburg for taking a photo of a restroom marked "Colored." Not one to shy away from controversy, he photographed a family victimized by the Ku Klux Klan. He told the students a cross was burned on their lawn because the grandson was deemed “sassy” for looking at a white person. His family’s heritage is Native American, Caucasian and African-American, he said, but they were considered people of color, and when a family trip to North Carolina came to a halt because their car broke down, they couldn’t find a place to stay. “This was probably what would be I-95 today,” he said, showing a photo of the broken-down car and his family. One of his most requested photos, he told the students, was from a march in downtown Orangeburg with students holding signs that said "FREEDOM" and "DOWN WITH SEGREGATION." Another of his well-published photos depicted teachers in Elloree fired for refusing to disavow the NAACP. He recalled he was probably paid $50 for a photo, which was a significant amount at the time “and encouraged me to go forward.” One of his most exciting times was personally meeting John F. Kennedy, then a Massachusetts senator who was aspiring to become president. “I became a good acquaintance of him and shared my pictures with him,” he said, and Williams even wrangled a seat on Kennedy's campaign plane as the lone member of the press. The most pivotal time of his life and career came in 1968, several years after the landmark Civil Rights Act had been passed under President Lyndon B. Johnson. “Everything had been opened up,” he said. “But not in Orangeburg, South Carolina.” A bowling alley that was still segregated prompted a demonstration by students that resulted in a melee ending with the shooting deaths of three African-American men. “Total disregard for human life,” he said. “They injured 27 and killed three young men, who were my friends, just because they wanted to bowl in a bowling alley, and they wanted the right to demonstrate.” Whether it was the Orangeburg Massacre or demonstrations in Columbia and Charleston, Williams said, he wasn’t there solely to capture history. “At the time it was unavoidable and, you might say, the thing to do,” he said. “Had I not been there with a camera, I would have been there as a student or participant myself. So I was an eyewitness and participant.” At one point in his life, Williams said, he wanted to study architecture at Clemson University but wasn’t able to because of his skin color. He nonetheless designed several homes and has spent time with inventions as well; one of those, the Film Toaster, is something he spent years tinkering with. Used to digitize decaying negatives, the Film Toaster – patent pending – has allowed him to preserve his legacy and ensure his archives remain in good shape. With grant funding, there are five Claflin University students working with two Film Toasters to keep his historical record intact. “I’m trying to show what it was like growing up in the middle of a revolution, one of the most significant revolutions of mankind,” Williams said. “It made America and the world a better place.”