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$550.00 Innovate Grants: A call for artists + photographers

Innovate Grant is now accepting submissions for the Fall 2020 Cycle.

Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one Visual Artist and one Photographer. In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. For more information and to apply visit https://innovateartistgrants.org Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that. (Ed. note: These are not South Carolina Arts Commission grants. This post does not imply ownership of or endorsement of this program or grant opportunity.)

How to Apply

Visual Artists and Photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org
  • Category: Multiple disciplines and genres accepted
  • Deadline: December 10, 2020
  • Region: U.S. & International
  • Awards: $550.00 grants

Explore the work of past Innovate Grant recipients and read their interviews at https://innovateartistgrants.org Bianca Barandun London + Zurich Summer Grant Recipient – Art Torrance Hall Baltimore, MD Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Kylie Lockwood Detroit, MI Spring Grant Recipient – Art Lindsey Kennedy Santa Fe, NM Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Lynnea Holland Weiss Cleveland, OH Winter Grant Recipient – Art Dylan Hausthor New Haven, CT Winter Grant Recipient – Photography Christine Atkinson Los Angeles, CA Fall Grant Recipient – Art Brendon Kahn Dallas, TX Fall Grant Recipient – Photography Joe Hedges Pullman, WA Summer Grant Recipient – Art Leafy Yeh Los Angeles, CA Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Margaret Jacobs Enfield, NH Spring Grant Recipient – Art Ceaphas Stubbs Newark, NJ Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Taylor O. Thomas Tampa, FL Winter Grant Recipient – Art Shane Lavalette Syracuse, NY Winter Grant Recipient – Photography
 

Jason Rapp

National call for photography submissions

$1,000 awarded to first prize

Submission deadline: Monday, September 28, 2020 at 11:59 p.m. ET
Maryland's Delaplaine Arts Center sent The Hub word of its upcoming National Juried Photography Exhibition. Submissions are being taken right now through Sept. 28. The National Juried Photography Exhibition is held biennially in November at the center as part of Focus, its month-long celebration of photography. Artists residing within the U.S. are invited to enter up to three photographs for consideration. All photographs are eligible.

Important Dates

  • September 28, 2020 • Deadline for entry submission (by 11:59 pm)
  • October 12, 2020 • Notification of accepted works (by 5 pm)
  • October 29, 2020 • Deadline for delivery of accepted works
  • November 7 – 29, 2020 • Exhibition (physical & virtual)

Awards

  • First — $1,000
  • Second — $500
  • Third — $250
  • Honorable Mention — $125

About the Juror

Regina DeLuise is a Guggenheim Fellow and full-time faculty at the Maryland Institute College of Art. Her work is represented in private and public collections, including Museum of Modern Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Art Institute of Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Houston Museum of Fine Art, and the Canadian Centre for Architecture in Montreal. She has worked at the Daniel Wolf Gallery in NYC and co-founded Elm Street Arts, a cooperative gallery in Manchester, Vermont. DeLuise is from Brooklyn, New York, and received her BFA from SUNY in Purchase, New York, and her MA from Rosary College in Florence, Italy.

Entry Guidelines

  • All photographs, black & white, color, non-silver, computer-manipulated, digital, or pinhole are eligible.
  • All photographs should have been completed by the submitting artist in the last 2 years. Accepted works should arrive ready to hang.
  • Fee — $35 per artist ($25 if artist is a current member of the Delaplaine).
  • Number of Pieces — Artists may submit up to three (3) photographs (in JPEG format) for consideration.
  • Go here to submit your artwork.

Submitted material

Call for Artists + Photographers: Innovate Grants

Application deadline: Tuesday, Feb. 11, 2020


Innovate Grant is now accepting submissions for the Winter Cycle. Innovate Grant awards (2) $550.00 grants each quarter, to one Visual Artist and one Photographer. In addition to receiving a grant award, winners will be featured and recognized on our website and join a growing community of vibrant and talented artists. For more information and to apply visit https://innovateartistgrants.org. Innovate Grant supports artists and photographers through quarterly grants. We've simplified the grant process, so that artists and photographers can focus on making their innovative work. The work should speak for itself and our application reflects that.
  • Category: Multiple disciplines and genres accepted
  • Deadline: February 11, 2020
  • Region: International
  • Awards: $550.00 Grants

How to Apply

Visual Artists and Photographers 18 years and older, from all around the world, are eligible to apply. All media and genres are accepted. All applicants retain the right to the work they submit. Apply today at https://innovateartistgrants.org.

Innovate Grant Winners

Christine Atkinson Los Angeles, CA Fall Grant Recipient – Art Brendon Kahn Dallas, TX Fall Grant Recipient – Photography Joe Hedges Pullman, WA Summer Grant Recipient – Art Leafy Yeh Los Angeles, CA Summer Grant Recipient – Photography Margaret Jacobs Enfield, NH Spring Grant Recipient – Art Ceaphas Stubbs Newark, NJ Spring Grant Recipient – Photography Taylor O. Thomas Tampa, FL Winter Grant Recipient – Art Shane Lavalette Syracuse, NY Winter Grant Recipient – PhotographyInnovat
Apply online today: https://innovateartistgntras.org

S.C. State Parks to offer arts programs in 2019

Photography, painting to be offered throughout year

In 2019, state parks in South Carolina will offer programming that combines art, culture, heritage and ranger-guided recreational excursions to some of the state's most beautiful and significant settings. Many of the events in the series are hours-long or overnight premium experiences and can be found at www.SCParkStore.com as their registration deadlines approach. A Winter Nature Photography Workshop with renowned photographer Robert Rommel, for example, will be held Jan. 11-14 at Santee State Park. Participants will spend an entire weekend studying the art, creativity and technical aspects of nature photography, concentrating on landscape, wildlife and up-close shots. Other programs involve yoga, painting, paddling and 5K running. People who are interested in these exceptional experiences should check www.SCParkStore.com often throughout the year for registration details. You can also mark your calendars for arts programs on these dates:
  • Indigo painting at Santee State Park on March 3. The event also will be held:
    • March 19 and Sept. 17 at Devils Fork
    • Oct. 8 back at Santee
  • Watercolor journaling at Santee State Park on March 10-12
  • Watercolor painting with Amelia at Santee State Park on April 14-16
Non-arts programs include:
  • 5K runs at Sadlers Creek (Feb. 23), Hickory Knob (March 16), Huntington Beach (April 6) and Sesquicentennial (May 11).
  • Yoga in the Park with Cheryl Mason at Santee State Park on April 7-9. This weekend event also will be held Oct. 27-29 at Table Rock State Park.
  • Kayak with a Ranger at Colleton State Park on the fourth Fridays of every month beginning March 22 and ending Oct. 25.
  • Kayak with a Ranger at Givhans Ferry State Park on the first Fridays of every month beginning April 5 and ending Nov. 1.
  • Stand-Up Paddleboarding with a Ranger at Table Rock State Park on the third Friday of every month beginning May 17 and ending Oct. 18.
Fees for these premium programs range from $35 for a single-day event to $225 for an event that covers an entire weekend. Details, including when and how to register, any available discounts and how to book lodging, can be found at www.SCParkStore.com.

Photographer Cecil Williams tells students about growing up in the segregated South

[gallery ids="29482,29481,29480"] Note: The S.C. African American Heritage Foundation received an Arts in Education Project grant to help fund an artist residency featuring photographer Cecil Williams. Images above: The South Carolina Arts Commission's State Art Collection includes three works by Williams. (click on an image for larger view.) From SCNow.com Article and photo by Joe Perry

[caption id="attachment_29478" align="alignright" width="300"]Cecil Williams Cecil Williams[/caption] LAMAR, S.C. – Life under segregation in South Carolina was not easy, but Cecil Williams was there with his camera, capturing history as it was made. The 79-year-old Orangeburg native spoke on Jan. 9 to students at Lamar High School as part of a two-day residency that included a presentation that night at Black Creek Arts Council and an appearance at Mayo High School in Darlington. The residency is funded through the South Carolina African American Heritage Foundation and S.C. Arts Commission. Williams got his first camera when he was 9 years old as his brother’s interests turned to music and playing the saxophone. Williams was instantly enthralled with the Kodak “Baby Brownie,” he said, and he figured out “a little hustle” early on. With 12 exposures, he’d go to Edisto Gardens to photograph couples. Developing the film cost a dollar. “That means I would make 11 dollars,” he said, laughing. His career and subject matter, though, soon turned to how he saw the disadvantages African-Americans faced. As part of his slideshow, Williams shared photos that reached millions of people through publications such as Life and Newsweek magazines and The New York Times, while his primary employer was JET magazine. “How was it back then for African-Americans at the time?” he said. “When people, just because of the color of their skin, don’t have the same rights as other people?” Williams was chased out of the courthouse in Orangeburg for taking a photo of a restroom marked "Colored." Not one to shy away from controversy, he photographed a family victimized by the Ku Klux Klan. He told the students a cross was burned on their lawn because the grandson was deemed “sassy” for looking at a white person. His family’s heritage is Native American, Caucasian and African-American, he said, but they were considered people of color, and when a family trip to North Carolina came to a halt because their car broke down, they couldn’t find a place to stay. “This was probably what would be I-95 today,” he said, showing a photo of the broken-down car and his family. One of his most requested photos, he told the students, was from a march in downtown Orangeburg with students holding signs that said "FREEDOM" and "DOWN WITH SEGREGATION." Another of his well-published photos depicted teachers in Elloree fired for refusing to disavow the NAACP. He recalled he was probably paid $50 for a photo, which was a significant amount at the time “and encouraged me to go forward.” One of his most exciting times was personally meeting John F. Kennedy, then a Massachusetts senator who was aspiring to become president. “I became a good acquaintance of him and shared my pictures with him,” he said, and Williams even wrangled a seat on Kennedy's campaign plane as the lone member of the press. The most pivotal time of his life and career came in 1968, several years after the landmark Civil Rights Act had been passed under President Lyndon B. Johnson. “Everything had been opened up,” he said. “But not in Orangeburg, South Carolina.” A bowling alley that was still segregated prompted a demonstration by students that resulted in a melee ending with the shooting deaths of three African-American men. “Total disregard for human life,” he said. “They injured 27 and killed three young men, who were my friends, just because they wanted to bowl in a bowling alley, and they wanted the right to demonstrate.” Whether it was the Orangeburg Massacre or demonstrations in Columbia and Charleston, Williams said, he wasn’t there solely to capture history. “At the time it was unavoidable and, you might say, the thing to do,” he said. “Had I not been there with a camera, I would have been there as a student or participant myself. So I was an eyewitness and participant.” At one point in his life, Williams said, he wanted to study architecture at Clemson University but wasn’t able to because of his skin color. He nonetheless designed several homes and has spent time with inventions as well; one of those, the Film Toaster, is something he spent years tinkering with. Used to digitize decaying negatives, the Film Toaster – patent pending – has allowed him to preserve his legacy and ensure his archives remain in good shape. With grant funding, there are five Claflin University students working with two Film Toasters to keep his historical record intact. “I’m trying to show what it was like growing up in the middle of a revolution, one of the most significant revolutions of mankind,” Williams said. “It made America and the world a better place.”

McCormick Arts Council invites photographers to enter juried exhibition

The McCormick Arts Council invites all residents of the United States, 18 years of age or older, to participate in its annual Juried Photography Exhibition held during July.  Cash prizes will be awarded to Best in Show, 2nd Place and 3rd Place winners. Artwork must be original and completed in the last three years. Any copy of the work of another artist, or of a picture or photo which has appeared in print and uses its composition or essential art elements is NOT considered original. This exhibition is limited to photography. Wall mounted work must be framed and securely wired, weigh no more than 50 lbs., or exceed 50". The MACK will not be responsible for glass breakage. No clip mounts will be accepted. Work not adequately prepared for display will be removed from jury. Delivery of Entries: Friday, June 17, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday, June 18, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Monday, June 20, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Jurying of Artwork: Friday, June 24, 2016 Notifications will be made by email or phone through June 30. Opening Reception: Friday, July 8, 2016 Entry Fee: $25 for one entry, $35 for two, $45 for three. Non-refundable. Complete details are available online.

North Charleston Arts Fest call for fine art and photography

The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department invites entries for the North Charleston Arts Fest Judged Fine Art Competition and the Judged Photography Exhibition. Both exhibitions will be on display at the Charleston Area Convention Center April 29 – May 6. Artists ages 18 and up are invited to participate in the fine art competition, which includes cash awards in five categories totaling up to $4,675. Categories include acrylic, oil, drawing/pastel, watercolor, and mixed media. Applicant may enter any combination of categories with a maximum of four entries total. Entries must be ready for exhibition. Maximum width of entries is 48"w x 60"h x 3"d (including frame). Work must be framed, gallery wrapped, or have finished edges and must be wired for hanging. No glass clip frames or hanging brackets. A non-refundable fee of $10 per entry is due at drop-off. Entry fee is paid by cash, credit card, or check made payable to the City of North Charleston. A 15 percent commission will be charged on all sales resulting from the exhibit. Amiri Gueka Farris is the judge for the fine art competition. Farris is a contemporary artist working in painting, drawing, video, performance, and installation. His pieces are inspired by intimate, personal experiences and examine issues surrounding race, culture, memory, and perception. Farris received his MFA in Painting and BFA in Illustration and Graphic Design from the Savannah College of Art and Design. His academic appointments have included professor of Fine Arts Foundations and Graphic Design for the Betty Foy Sanders Department of Art at Georgia Southern University and professor of Fine Arts at the University of South Carolina-Beaufort. His work has been featured in more than 50 solo exhibitions and juried museum exhibitions across the U.S., including the United States Capitol and the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C. He currently resides in Bluffton, S.C, and teaches Foundation Studies at the Savannah College of Art Design. Professional and amateur photographers ages 18 and up are invited to participate in the photography exhibition, which will offer cash awards in three categories totaling $2,175. Divisions include professional or advanced and amateur. Categories are color, monochrome, and digital illustration. Applicant may enter any combination of categories with a maximum of four entries total. Entries must be ready for exhibition. Minimum print size is 8"x 10" mounted on foam core or gator board. Matting is optional. Maximum mat size is 16"x 20"x 1/4". No frames, hooks, or plastic wrapped entries. Self-adhesive hanging tabs will be attached to the back of each piece by sponsor. A non-refundable fee of $5 per entry is due at drop-off. Entry fee is paid by cash, credit card, or check made payable to the City of North Charleston. A 15 percent commission will be charged on all sales resulting from the exhibit. The photography exhibition judge is Michelle Van Parys, a professor at the College of Charleston in the Studio Art Department. She received her BFA from the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C. and her MFA in Photography from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her photographs have been shown internationally in solo and group exhibitions. A monograph of her photographs, titled The Way Out West: Desert Landscapes, was published in 2009 by the Center for American Places at Columbia College Chicago. Van Parys has been the recipient of a Virginia Museum Fellowship and a S.C. Arts Commission Fellowship.  Her work is included in several museum collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, The High Museum, the Virginia Museum of Fine Art and the Portland Art Museum. Entries for both exhibitions must be delivered Weds., April 27 or Thurs., April 28, from noon - 7 p.m. Deliver entries to the Exhibit Hall Lobby of the Charleston Area Convention Center (5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston, SC 29418). Use the International Blvd. entrance. Directional signs will be posted. Find a full prospectus and entry instructions for both exhibitions at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply.

FilmToaster: Acclaimed photographer Cecil Williams invents tool to preserve negatives

Note: Three photographs by Cecil Williams are in the State Art Collection. From the Orangeburg Times and Democrat Article and photo by Princess Williams

“A picture is worth a thousand words,” or so goes the old saying. If that's true, an award-winning Orangeburg photographer's body of work over several decades speaks volumes about the history he has chronicled with his cameras. Cecil Williams has captured once-in-a-lifetime moments dating back to the Civil Rights Movement. He is also an "inventor," with his most recent creation being a tool called the FilmToaster, which preserves negatives. Williams, who has worked for JET Magazine and owns a photography studio, Cecil Williams Photography LLC, created the tool that enables users to put their film in digital format. “Digital offers (film) a new lease on life,” Williams said. Williams began taking photos in 1947 at the age of 9. Since then, he has accumulated approximately a half-million to a million negatives. He recently recognized that about 2,000 of his negatives were in peril. They had begun to crack, coil and become damaged. “I was alarmed at the rate of the decline. This happens just like cancer. It spreads,” Williams said. Each of the damaged negatives has to be discarded because they've dried out and can catch fire easily. “As they become inflammable -- if I didn’t weed these out where all my other negatives are stored, it could be dangerous,” Williams said. “Our heritage, our history, our legacy, our culture lies in someone taking the responsibility to save archives like my collection,” he said. Williams was driven to find a solution to the problem in order to save his negatives. He began to experiment to find a less time-consuming tool than the flatbed scanner most photographers use. “I got to thinking about it. I said, ‘Well, with today’s digital cameras, why not take a picture of (the negatives)?' " he said. The FilmToaster takes a photo of the negatives in less than 5 or 6 seconds, preserving and converting the negative into digital format, which takes less time than the flatbed scanner. “My product does it faster and with higher resolution. At the most, I don’t care how expensive you go with a flatbed -- it’s still limited to do about 10 or 8 or 6 megabytes. Wherein, if I take a 24- or 36-megabyte camera, I’ve then got a 24- or 36-megabyte copy of my negative. The more resolution, the higher the quality of it," Williams said. His invention has "slots" that enable its users to put different sizes of film inside. “It’s probably the only one in the world that does that. I can use 35 millimeter; I can use slide film; I can use medium format; I can even use 4x5,” Williams said. A replaceable light source is used at the bottom of the FilmToaster. “This whole unit is completely passive. It has no electricity within itself or any electronic components. Therefore, it won’t go out, neither will it become obsolete,” Williams said. Users can always add new cameras by way of the filters, and they can always add a new light if the light should burn out, he noted. Williams compares his invention to "a horse, a saddle and a rider." “The FilmToaster is the saddle because the camera can 'ride' on this device that I’ve created in this cozy environment in order to get a closeup picture and duplicate your negative," he said. “Once your negative is digital, then you can put it on the computer. You can add metadata to it. You can use digital asset management software to further identify when it was or who it was in the picture.” Williams debuted the FilmToaster at the New York Photo Expo in October. About 35,000 photographers attend the expo each year. The FilmToaster is currently being sold online on Amazon, eBay and on Williams’ website atwww.filmtoaster.photography for $2,399. Within a five-month period, he has sold 63 FilmToasters. He uses Google Analytics to monitor the locations of his potential buyers. Currently, the machine and its components (four film carriers) are made in Nova Scotia. “Frequently, my customers have questions. I give support also, along with selling of the merchandise,” Williams said. “You have to know something about macro photography to be versatile with this.”
Creating the FilmToaster was about a six-year task for Williams. He is awaiting a provisional patent.
Williams also has created two other inventions during his career, but he did not patent them or follow through on them. He markets the FilmToaster through his own developing list of potential buyers, such as museums, archiving places and photographers. The FilmToaster has been mentioned in USA Today and has been described as the "Object of Desire" by PDN Magazine, an award-winning publication for the professional photography industry. Williams has been appointed the director of Historic Preservation at Claflin University. “We will have work-study students who will be working with the FilmToaster. They’ll be helping me scan my vast collection of negatives -- at the same time, gaining practical experiences," he said. Williams was recently selected to receive the Herbert A. DeCosta Jr. Trailblazer Award for extraordinary accomplishments in his profession by the South Carolina African American Heritage Commission. The award recognizes exceptional achievement by South Carolinians in the arts, science, government, economics and academics. Congressman James "Jim" Clyburn is also a recipient of the Trailblazer Award. Williams, 78, says it has become extremely difficult to stay ahead in the photo and digital technology world because "everyone thinks they’re a photographer." “However, I would call myself a real photographer. I go beyond what a lot of the instant picture-taking does today through cellphones and digital cameras,” he said. “I think I stay ahead by doing things other people cannot do ... " Williams calls himself the "Energizer Bunny," saying he doesn’t stop when it comes to his craft. “I am passionate about history, technology, photography and art," he said. "I feel that in order to be good at something, you have to go beyond the ordinary amount of time that you devote to it to learn about it, become an expert in it and overcome the challenges that may come about.”

Halsey Institute receives $40,000 grant from National Endowment for the Arts

Halsey InstituteAs part of its first round of funding for fiscal year 2016, the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded more than $27.6 million, including an Art Works grant of $40,000 to the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art in Charleston, S.C. The grant will help support a major exhibition featuring photography of and about the South, to be exhibited in 2017. Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South, is a multi-media project comprised of some 50 photographers' visions of the South over several decades at the turn of the 21st century.  Accordingly, it will offer a composite image of the region. The photographs echo stories told about the South as a bastion of tradition, as a region remade through Americanization and globalization, and as a land full of surprising realities. The photographs will be complemented by a commissioned video, an interactive digital mapping environment, an extensive stand-alone website, and a comprehensive exhibition catalog. This publication, as well as additional programming, will draw on expertise from disciplines in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Southbound is co-curated by Mark Sloan, director and chief curator of the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, and Mark Long, professor of political science, both at the College of Charleston. NEA’s Art Works category supports the creation of work and presentation of both new and existing work, lifelong learning in the arts, and public engagement with the arts through 13 arts disciplines or fields. In its first 50 years, the NEA has awarded more than $5 billion in grants to recipients in every state and U.S. jurisdiction, the only arts funder in the nation to do so. Image: John Hathaway, Little Stony Creek, Watauga Lake, 2012 Via: Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art

Visual art exhibition opportunities offered in North Charleston

Accepting applications for North Charleston City Gallery, City Hall, and other City sites. The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department offers exhibition opportunities for serious visual artists, photographers, fine craft artisans, sculptors, and installation artists. Applications are now being accepted from individuals and groups to display original works at the North Charleston City Gallery, North Charleston City Hall, and other public sites for the July 2016 through June 2017 program calendar. There is no fee to apply. Selections are made by a review panel appointed by the department. Artists must apply online at www.northcharlestonculturalartsdpartment.slideroom.com by Monday, November 30, 2015 in order to be considered. The North Charleston City Gallery, located in the common areas of the Charleston Area Convention Center Complex, offers great exposure for artists seeking to reach thousands of local patrons and out-of-state visitors to the multi-use facility. Exhibits are rotated on a monthly basis and may feature two or more artists concurrently. This exhibition opportunity is open to visual artists and artist groups creating two-dimensional works or three-dimensional works suited to hang on display rods provided. Pedestal and freestanding pieces cannot be accommodated in the venue. Exhibits are open to the public daily and admission is free. The gallery desk is managed by a Cultural Arts staff member on Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays for the express purpose of promoting the exhibit and sale of artwork, prints, note cards, and gift items. As a civic venue, North Charleston City Hall allows for great visibility among residents and visitors. In addition to showcasing the City’s Public Art Collection along the atrium areas of three floors, the building is equipped to display two-dimensional works as well as pedestal or free standing pieces in an enclave on the second floor. Exhibits in this space are rotated on a monthly or bi-monthly basis and may be viewed by the public daily with no admission fee. Cultural Arts staff maintains offices on the same floor of the exhibit space and are available to assist visitors. In addition to the City Gallery and City Hall, other indoor and outdoor display spaces are available throughout North Charleston. Applicants can propose a location or may contact the Cultural Arts Department to discuss possible exhibition or installation sites. Options will be reviewed with the artist prior to distribution of acceptance notifications. For additional information about these and other exhibition opportunities or to learn more about programs and services offered by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website at northcharleston.org, email culturalarts@northcharleston.org, or call 843-740-5854. Via: City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department