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Applications open for 2016 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards

The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, invites applications for the 2016 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards. The 12 award-winning programs will receive $10,000 and an invitation to accept their award from the President’s Committee’s Honorary Chairman, First Lady Michelle Obama, at a White House ceremony. In addition, winners will receive an award plaque, the opportunity to attend the Annual Awardee Conference in Washington, DC in the summer of 2016, and will be featured on the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award website. After-school and out-of-school time arts and humanities programs sponsored by museums, libraries, performing arts organizations; educational institutions (e.g., preschools; elementary, middle, and high schools; universities; and colleges), arts centers, community service organizations, businesses, and eligible government entities are encouraged to submit applications. Programs applying for the award must meet all of the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award’s eligibility criteria. The deadline for application submissions is Tuesday, February 2, 2016, 5:00 p.m. PST. More information is available online, including the list of 2015 awardees and application guidelines.    

Clemson University celebrates 50th anniversary of the NEA and NEH

From Clemson University Article by Jeannie Davis

Clemson University celebrates NEA 50thCLEMSON — Clemson University Tuesday joined a nationwide celebration of the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities with a luncheon honoring Clemson faculty — past and present — who have received grant support from either agency. Clemson President James P. Clements said, “It is hard to believe these two agencies are only 50 years old because I can’t imagine our country without them.” Guest speakers included Randy Akers, director of the S.C. Humanities Council, and Ken May, executive director of the S.C. Arts Commission, who spoke about the respective roles of the arts and the humanities in higher education. Clemson Mayor J.C. Cook read a proclamation thanking the two agencies for “making a difference in promoting appreciation for the arts and humanities.” Cook’s statement acknowledged the arts and humanities for embodying “much of the accumulated wisdom, creativity, intellect and imagination of humankind.” “The humanities and arts are the beating heart of a great university,” said Richard Goodstein, dean of the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities. “Every Clemson University student is touched by these disciplines in meaningful ways, not only in the classroom but also through cultural offerings, such as the Clemson Literary Festival and performances and exhibitions at the Lee Gallery and the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. “In recent years, employers have made it very clear that they value graduates who are thoroughly educated in the humanities, who can think critically. They are looking for graduates who are creative, who can navigate the constantly evolving landscape of thought and communication. At Clemson, we recognize that we are not just training workers, but educating citizens.” Clemson’s disciplines in the arts include visual and performing arts. The humanities disciplines comprise communication studies, English, history, languages, philosophy and religion. Programs that engage faculty from more than one discipline are increasingly in demand, and in recent years new undergraduate degree programs have been offered in Pan African studies, women’s leadership and world cinema. An interdisciplinary doctoral program in rhetorics, communication, and information design is now in its 11thyear. The event was sponsored by the Office of the President; the Office of the Provost; and the College of Architecture, Arts and Humanities.

Out-of-school arts, humanities programs may be eligible for national $10,000 award

Application deadline is Feb. 10, 2014. The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, invites applications for the 2014 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards (formerly the Coming Up Taller Awards). The National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award is the nation's highest honor for out-of-school arts and humanities programs that celebrate the creativity of America's young people, particularly those from underserved communities. Programs that receive the award exemplify how arts and humanities programs outside of the regular school day enrich the lives of young people by teaching new skills, nurturing creativity and building self-confidence. These programs offer high-quality and intensive instruction on weekends, afternoons and summer vacations, providing a safe and productive space for young people in the hours when they are often the most vulnerable. Each year, the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards recognize 12 outstanding programs in the United States, from a wide range of urban and rural settings. The award-winning programs will receive $10,000 and an invitation to accept their award from the President’s Committee’s Honorary Chairman, First Lady Michelle Obama, at a ceremony at the White House. In addition, winners will receive an award plaque, the opportunity to attend the Annual Awardee Conference in Washington, DC in the summer of 2014, and will be featured on the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award website. After-school and out-of-school time arts and humanities programs sponsored by museums, libraries, performing arts organizations, educational institutions (e.g., preschools; elementary, middle, and high schools; universities; and colleges), arts centers, community service organizations, businesses, and eligible government entities are encouraged to consider applying. Programs applying for the award must meet all eligibility criteria. Find out more and apply here. Applications will only be accepted via the online process. The application deadline is Feb. 10, 2014, 5 p.m. PST. Via: National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award

National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards

The President’s Committee on the Arts and the Humanities, in partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, invites applications for the 2013 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards. The deadline for online submissions is Monday, February 4, 2013, 5:00 p.m. PST. [caption id="attachment_3693" align="alignnone" width="620"] First Lady Michelle Obama with Gail Easley and Tiffani Prigrom of RISE! (Rhythm in Setting Expectations) at the 2012 National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Awards ceremony at the White House. Photo: Steven E. Purcell[/caption] Programs that receive the award exemplify how arts and humanities programs outside of the regular school day enrich the lives of young people throughout the country by teaching new skills, nurturing creativity, and building self-confidence. These programs offer high-quality and intensive instruction on weekends, afternoons, and summer vacations, providing a safe and productive space for young people in the hours when they are often the most vulnerable. [caption id="attachment_3697" align="alignnone" width="620"] An Arts Corps participant learns how to draw in perspective. Photo: Susie Fitzhugh, Arts Corps[/caption] The twelve award-winning programs this year will receive $10,000 and an invitation to accept their award from the President’s Committee’s Honorary Chairman, First Lady Michelle Obama, at a ceremony at the White House. In addition, winners will receive an award plaque, have the opportunity to attend the Annual Awardee Conference in Washington, DC in the summer of 2013, and will be featured on the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award website. [caption id="attachment_3695" align="alignnone" width="620"] Teen Arts Council members with artist Swoon. From left: Terry Voong, August Rosenberg, Caledonia Curry (Swoon), and Shaquille Alberts. Photo: Joe Douillette[/caption] After-school and out-of-school time arts and humanities programs sponsored by museums, libraries, performing arts organizations; educational institutions (e.g., preschools; elementary, middle, and high schools; universities; and colleges), arts centers, community service organizations, businesses, and eligible government entities are encouraged to consider submitting an application. Programs applying for the award must meet all of the National Arts and Humanities Youth Program Award’s Eligibility Criteria. Via: National Arts and Humanities Youth Program