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Jason Rapp

Decorated #SCartists highlight new gallery exhibition

SCAC fellows, Governor's Award recipients featured

[caption id="attachment_45026" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Unnamed by Edward Rice Unnamed by Edward Rice. 2019-2020. Oil. 84x42.[/caption]

What's going on? What does it mean? What's next? What really matters?

These are questions asked by Hampton III Gallery at its new exhibition, In Times Like These, which runs July 9 through August 29, 2020. From the gallery:

As our world changes, artists continue to create and explore through visual language. In Times Like These is an exhibition that allows the viewer to enter into the personal space of 20 Hampton III Gallery artists.These artworks were created from March through June 2020. All are on display in the center gallery. Visitors are welcome to view the exhibition during regular hours. Social distancing will be observed and masks are required during this time. 

Featured among the 20 Southern artists in the exhibition are several from South Carolina represented by the gallery, including recipients of two of the South Carolina Arts Commission's highest honors: individual artist fellowships or the Governor's Arts Award.

SCAC Fellows

  • Alice Ballard
  • Dr. Philip Mullen
  • Edward Rice

Governor's Award recipients

  • Jeanet Dreskin
  • Dr. Philip Mullen
  • Edward Rice
  • Tom Stanley
  • Dr. Leo Twiggs
Hampton III Gallery is itself a 2019 recipient of the Governor's Arts Award.
Going? Hampton III Gallery is located outside Greenville in Taylors at 3110 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 10. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday from 1-5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and other times by appointment. Free.   

Rucker, Twiggs headed to S.C. Hall of Fame

Induction ceremony is Feb. 7

[caption id="attachment_43813" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Headshots of Darius Rucker, Dr. Leo Twiggs, and Evelyn Wright, the 2020 inductees of the South Carolina Hall of Fame. Photo courtesy of WPDE and the Official South Carolina Hall of Fame Board of Trustees.[/caption]
Two winners of the state's highest arts award will further live in infamy as members of South Carolina's Hall of Fame in Myrtle Beach. Darius Rucker (above, left) received the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts with his Hootie & the Blowfish bandmates in 2016. Dr. Leo Twiggs (above, center) received it in 2017. Both awards were special awards for lifetime achievement. They will be enshrined with Evelyn Wright (above, right) on Feb. 7, 2020, at 10:30 a.m. in the ballroom of the Myrtle Beach Convention Center (2101 North Oak St.). The event is free and open to the public. Fittingly, the accomplishments of all three inductees are almost too numerous to list, and neither Rucker nor Twiggs need to be introduced to Hub readers (but we'll provide brief ones anyway):

Leo Twiggs to talk art and race in Charlotte tonight

The Mint Museum in Charlotte is to be host of a conversation on art and race with Leo Twiggs of Orangeburg tonight from 6-9 p.m. Twiggs, recipient of two Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts, sits down with host Sarah Delia of WFAE 90.7FM. The program is inspired by the work of art entitled “Conversation”, created by Dr. Twiggs following his phenomenal exhibition “Requiem for Mother Emanuel” at the Mint Museum Randolph. Requiem was his artistic response to the massacre of nine church members during a prayer meeting in the historical Charleston house of worship, Mother Emanuel AME Church. Dr. Twiggs established the Art Department at South Carolina State University, Orangeburg, South Carolina and its art museum. Read more about the event here.  Story credit to WFAE.

Submitted material

Twiggs receives honor from Georgia Museum of Art

Prolific #SCartist adds to his accomplishments with Thompson Award

[caption id="attachment_39247" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Image of Leo Twiggs with award namesake Larry Thompson Dr. Leo Twiggs, left, recipient of the Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Award, and Larry Thompson.[/caption]
On Feb. 22, the Georgia Museum of Art at the University of Georgia held its annual Black History Month Dinner and Awards Celebration in Athens, Ga. Leo Twiggs received the Larry D. and Brenda A. Thompson Award for his efforts as an artist. This award is given annually to honor an African American artist who has made significant but often lesser-known contributions to the visual arts tradition in Georgia. It is named for the couple who donated 100 works by African American artists from their collection to the museum and endowed a curatorial position there (held by Shawnya L. Harris) to focus on art by African American and African diasporic artists. Twiggs studied art at Claflin College, the Art Institute of Chicago and New York University. In 1970, he became the first African American student to receive a doctorate of arts in art education from the University of Georgia. Twiggs went on to create the first fine arts degree program at South Carolina State University. In many of his works, he uses the wax-resist process of dyeing textiles called batik. His use of the Confederate flag serves as an evocative symbol of systemic racism in the South, and he continues to address social issues in his art, as with a recent series focusing on the murders at Mother Emanuel Church, in Charleston. A prolific artist, he has had work featured in 75 solo shows, one of which was held at the museum in 2004. Twiggs received the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts in the individual category from the S.C. Arts Commission in 1980 and was a recipient for lifetime achievement in 2017. Accepting the Thompson Award, Twiggs spoke about the event as a homecoming of sorts for him. “When I came here [to the University of Georgia] at the height of the civil rights movement, Lamar Dodd, chair of the art department, told me, ‘We don’t think of you as a student. We think of you as a colleague.' Art is a journey, but ours is a unique journey because: ‘We have come over a way that with tears has been watered. We have come, treading our path through the blood of the slaughtered," he continued, quoting “Lift Every Voice and Sing,” known as the “Negro national anthem." "James Baldwin said that ‘the purpose of art is to lay bare the questions that have been hidden by the answers.’ To that end, I have never looked away,” Twiggs said.

Tuning Up: HBCU artists + Florence arts grants + go for Baroque

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Twiggs curates TJC Gallery exhibition on HBCU artists. The recipient of virtually every major arts award South Carolina offers is back in the spotlight with a new exhibition in Spartanburg that coincides quite nicely with Black History Month. “Elevation from Within: The Study of Art at Historically Black Colleges and Universities,” opens tomorrow and runs through May 10. Admission varies; More info here. Grant opportunity for Florence County artists and arts organizations. From the Florence Regional Arts Alliance: apply now for grants from the FRAA's Quarterly Grants Program for Organizations & Individual Artists. It's designed to provide support for a wide variety of quality arts projects, as well as for professional development opportunities for artists and arts administrators. Organizations must be based in Florence County with a Florence County mailing address and be registered charitable organizations with federal non-profit status. Individual artists must be practicing artists in dance, literature, music, theatre or the visual arts and have a Florence County mailing address. Individual artists must be over the age of 18 at the time of application. Application deadline is May 15. Go for Baroque. (It's obligatory, and we're not sorry. - Ed.) And we're back in Spartanburg as Wofford College celebrates the visual art and music of the European Baroque period of the 17th and 18th centuries with a special exhibition, a concert of music from the period and presentations about the exhibit. (Story from GoUpstate.com) And finally... Columbia TV station WLTX looked at the arts in South Carolina with three #SCArtists during a Facebook Live event last night.

Tuning Up: 1858 Prize and forum tomorrow + SEPF 2019 lineup

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Collaborative first steps. Tomorrow is a big night at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston. Dr. Leo Twiggs is set to receive the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. The pride of Orangeburg is the first S.C. artist (ahem, #SCartists) to receive the $10,000 prize. But you knew all that. What you might not know is that afterward is the Amy P. Coy Forum and 1858 Prize Party (6-8 p.m., 135 Meeting St., Charleston) at which representatives from ArtFields, South Arts, and the Gibbes will use the forum to discuss collaboration among the Southeast's three biggest arts prizes, which happen to be awarded by those entities. Where will it lead? We don't know, but that's why we're going. See you there? $35. SEPF announces 2019 guest artists. (And there are some, ahem, key names here.) Summertime is music festival time, and every year Columbia is a piano hotspot. The Southeastern Piano Festival is set to return June 16-23, 2019 and last week announced their guest artists. Artistic Director Joseph Rackers promises and incredible week of music. (Take it from The Hub – don't miss Alessio Bax). In addition to performances, accomplished pianists will give masterclasses and it all comes to a head with the Arthur Fraser International Piano Competition on June 21. (The teenage winner performs a concerto with the South Carolina Philharmonic.)

Leo Twiggs wins prestigious 1858 Prize

Orangeburg artist Leo Twiggs – 2017 recipient of the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts for lifetime achievement and "elder statesman of contemporary art in South Carolina" – is the first S.C. artist to win the Society 1858 Prize for Contemporary Art. A native of St. Stephen, Twiggs works in batik, a wax-resist method of dying textiles. Much of his work explores family history, cultural heritage, and how the past is manifest in contemporary life. His series titled Requiem for Mother Emanuel recently traveled throughout the southeast, earning acclaim as a powerful tribute to the nine church members slain during the horrific shooting at Mother Emanuel AME Church in Charleston.

The 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art awards $10,000 to an artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Presented annually, the prize recognizes the highest level of artistic achievement in any media. Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to apply. Applications are accepted exclusively from August through September each year.
The prize is presented by Society 1858, a member auxiliary group of the Gibbes Museum of Art where young professionals support the Gibbes Museum with social and educational programs tailored for up-and-coming art patrons. Further reading See the exclusive by Adam Parker in the Post & Courier.

Congratulations to the 2017 Verner Award recipients!

Verner Award StatueCongratulations to the recipients of the 2017 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts! The S.C. Arts Commission annually presents the awards, the highest honor the state gives in the arts, to recognize outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina. Awards will be presented May 2 (time and location to be announced). Established in 1972, the annual awards recognize outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina. This year’s recipients:

“Each of these Verner Award recipients has contributed greatly to the arts community as an outstanding ambassador for our state," said S.C. Arts Commission Chairman Henry Horowitz. "Their dedication to the arts benefits South Carolinians and materially enhances our state’s economic vitality. As the Arts Commission marks its 50th anniversary, we are honored to recognize these organizations and individuals who embody the service, commitment and passion that helped build our state’s half century of leadership in the arts.” Also on May 2, the S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients and the arts community at the South Carolina Arts Award Luncheon, a fundraiser supporting the programs of the S.C. Arts Commission. An art sale begins at 11 a.m. at the USC Alumni Center, 900 Senate St. in Columbia, with the luncheon following at noon. Tickets are $50 per person and may be purchased online. The 2017 Verner Awards are sponsored by Colonial Life. For more about the Verner Awards or the S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon, call (803) 734-8696 or visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com. Image: First row, left to right: Laura Spong, Leo Twiggs, Quentin Baxter, Betsy Teter. Second row: Brenda McCutchen, City of Beaufort/USC Beaufort Center for the Arts, S.C. Humanities, Stringer and Rainey Foundations

Dr. Leo Twiggs’ Requiem for Mother Emanuel featured on ESPN

Leo Twiggs ESPNIn August, captains and coaches from the Carolina Panthers football team visited the Johnson Collection in Spartanburg to view the exhibition of Leo Twiggs' Requiem for Mother Emanuel series. The visit served as a springboard for ongoing conversations about race and reconciliation -- not only in the Panthers' locker room, but in communities across the region. In the wake of recent racial unrest in the Panthers' hometown of Charlotte, the dialogue took on even deeper meaning and relevance. As a follow-up to their coverage of the summer story, ESPN crews traveled to Charlotte and Spartanburg to interview the Panthers and Dr. Twiggs. In describing the complex emotions reflected in the nine Requiem paintings, Dr. Twiggs, a lifelong educator, reminds us all that "works of art are repositories of human experiences." View the ESPN video, which aired Oct. 10: On view at TJC Gallery in downtown Spartanburg through October 28, Requiem for Mother Emanuel takes viewers on an emotional and aesthetic journey from the horror of the church shootings through the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina State House grounds to the forgiveness extended by members of the Mother Emanuel congregation. The exhibition will be the foundation of an educational symposium October 11th in Spartanburg. Sponsored by the Johnson Collection. “Requiem for Mother Emanuel: An Exploration of Paint, Poetry, Race & Grace” will examine and expand upon the themes—human, artistic, cultural, and universal—presented in the series. Keynote speakers include Dr. Twiggs, South Carolina poet Nikky Finney, and Jane Panetta, associate curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art. The symposium will take place at 7 p.m., October 11 at Chapman Cultural Center; the event is free and open to the public. Via: The Johnson Collection

Check out this video: United States of Arts: South Carolina!

The National Endowment for the Arts invited each state arts agency to create a video celebrating the NEA's 50th anniversary and provided the film maker and resources to do so. A big thank you to the artists, educators, arts organizations and other folks who participated in or helped with the South Carolina Arts Commission's project! Enjoy!   https://youtu.be/PrPHctM7Ppw