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Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: April 30

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

So this is it for April.

The Hub doesn't know about you, but it felt only about half as long as March's approximately 250 days. Progress! (Right?) Let's dance into a new month, and get closer to returning to the people, places, and things we miss.

Here are some events for today. (Or anytime.)

Your event not here? Here's a little more on how Hub E-vents works.

Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: April 28

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

Here is an event for today Thursday

(Advance registration is required, so we're posting in advance.)

South Arts can help musicians hit the (jazz) road

#SCartists: apply for Jazz Road Tours grants of up to $15,000

Application deadline: Tuesday, April 21, 2020 [caption id="attachment_36519" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Columbia musician Mark Rapp (file photo).[/caption]
South Arts is now accepting applications for the second cycle of Jazz Road Tours, offering grants of up to $15,000 to support tours by emerging and mid-career jazz artists. South ArtsArtists can apply for funds to build tours that include three to six sites, with an emphasis on bringing jazz to rural, isolated, and underserved parts of the country. This national program, funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation with additional support from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, is led by South Arts in partnership with the five other U.S. Regional Arts Organizations (Arts Midwest, Mid-America Arts Alliance, Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation, New England Foundation for the Arts, and Western Arts Alliance/WESTAF). “This year, we have simplified the application process for artists,” said Sara Donnelly, director of jazz with South Arts. “We recognize how challenging it can be for artists to gain footholds in new markets or secure engagements in parts of the country that rarely see touring jazz artists, and Jazz Road aims to make touring possible.” This cycle of Jazz Road funding will support tours occurring between August 2020 and August 2021. Recipients will be able to use the funds to pay for necessary aspects of touring, including travel, lodging, meals, and artist fees. “Artists deserve to be paid equitably for their work, and Jazz Road is able to ensure that musicians can focus on their art as much as their wallets,” continued Donnelly. To apply, artists must submit information about themselves and any other artists in their ensemble, samples of their work, the structure of the tour, and offer letters countersigned by the performance venues. Artists living anywhere in the U.S. may apply. A peer panel will review all of the applicants using the criteria of artistic excellence and merit of the proposed tour to recommend funding. “Because of [Jazz Road], the tour was financially stable,” said Caleb Wheeler Curtis, a previous Jazz Road Tours grant recipient. “Without touring, a band cannot be a band. [Our] music grew exponentially. We are excited for the future and can imagine growing an audience to a sustainable size.” Applications for this round of Jazz Road Tours are due by April 21, 2020. Artists selected for funding will be informed in July. Full guidelines, program information, and additional details are available on www.jazzroad.org and www.southarts.org.

About South Arts

South Arts advances Southern vitality through the arts. The nonprofit regional arts organization was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to support the success of artists and arts providers in the South, address the needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs, and celebrate the excellence, innovation, value and power of the arts of the South. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.

Submitted material

Wheel Sessions: Greenville’s Underground Jazz Series

“Wheel Sessions” is a jazz performance series in Greenville with performances for an intimate listening audience on the 2nd and 4th Thursday of each month. The concerts begin at 7:30 p.m. The first 41 Wheel Sessions were held at their namesake venue, the Wheel, a shared arts space in West Greenville’s Arts District. Wheel Sessions host and resident drummer Kevin Korschgen transformed that location, filled with funky comfortable furniture, into a “groovy” underground jazz club not unlike one you might find in New York City’s Greenwich Village. Set as theater in the round, that intimate space played an important role in establishing a unique Wheel Session brand. However, the true success of the sessions is in the music! Sadly, the Wheel no longer exists – but the sessions continue to thrive. The Wheel Sessions enjoy an enthusiastic and supportive fan base. Whether billed as a House Party, held in a local club, or in its soon to be home, the Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship (GUUF), the Wheel Sessions are a must see and hear event. Mr. Korschgen consistently books many of the Carolina’s finest jazz musicians for the sessions, extending them complete artistic license to perform as if they where in Village. Until you have attended a Wheel Session it is hard to imagine such creative jazz brewing in the Upstate. For information on upcoming shows, visit wheelsessions.com.


Next event

Wheel Session 48 Thursday, July 26, 2018 Justin Ray Quartet 7:30-9:30 p.m. … doors open at 7 p.m. Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship 1135 State Park Rd., Greenville, SC 29609 Admission $15 (Cash only) To reserve a seat, phone or text 312.520.2760 or email Kevin at kmkorschgen@gmail.com.
Header photo by Chevanon Photography from Pexels

Tuning Up: Busking is back in Spartanburg + NEA Jazz Masters concert

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Not to go all meta on you, but today we bring a "Tuning Up" solely about... music. These entries are longer than normal "Tuning Up" entries, but we really, really felt like it was the perfect deployment of the feature. Enjoy! -Ed.

Busking returns to downtown Spartanburg

Chapman Cultural Center is excited to announce that the street music series is returning to the Spartanburg Downtown Cultural District starting this week! The CCC special events coordinator describes the program like this: "Street Music, or busking, is meant to be an intimate experience, not a large event. They are like micro, pop-up performances that are meant to enhance your experience downtown and encourage you to stay longer. You will be able to walk from one end of East Main Street at Liberty all the way to The Grain District and hear a variety of musical instruments, genres, and styles." The Street Music Series launched in August 2017 and ran for 13 weeks. In that time, the Cultural District was host of  145 gigs featuring nine genres of music that more than 1,800 people stopped to enjoy along Main Street.  

Free events celebrate masters in jazz

The National Endowment for the Arts is paying tribute to the 2018 NEA Jazz Masters – Todd Barkan, Joanne Brackeen, Pat Metheny, and Dianne Reeves – with a free, Kennedy Center concert in Washington on Monday, April 16. The concert, which will also be webcast live, will bring together many stars of the jazz world in performances that will highlight the NEA Jazz Masters’ careers. The concert will be hosted by Jason Moran, pianist and Kennedy Center artistic director for jazz, and include remarks by the 2018 NEA Jazz Masters, as well as Jane Chu, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts and Deborah F. Rutter, president of the Kennedy Center. The concert will include performances by:
  • Terri Lyne Carrington,
  • Nir Felder,
  • Sullivan Fortner,
  • James Francies,
  • Pasquale Grasso,
  • Gilad Hekselman,
  • Angelique Kidjo,
  • Christian McBride,
  • Camila Meza,
  • NEA Jazz Master Eddie Palmieri and the Eddie Palmieri Sextet,
  • Cécile McLorin Salvant,
  • Antonio Sanchez,
  • Helen Sung,
  • and Dan Wilson.
And oh, by the way, you're invited. Up to four (4) tickets per household may be reserved for this free concert in person at the Kennedy Center Box Office, at kennedy-center.org, or by dialing 202-467-4600 or 800-444-1324. Reservation confirmations should be printed at home (note: these are not tickets, but reservations), and will be valid until 7:45 p.m. Monday, April 16, 2018. Print-at-home tickets are unavailable for this concert. Those with ticket reservations should bring their printed reservation confirmations to the Kennedy Center Hall of Nations Box Office on Monday, April 16, 2018, between 5:30 p.m. to 7:45 p.m. to receive their tickets with seating locations. All reserved tickets not picked up by 7:45 p.m. on April 16 will be released and distributed to a ticket giveaway line. If you're not up for a trip to D.C. (those cherry blossoms, though!), the concert will be video-streamed live on the NEA and Kennedy Center websites, among others. An archive of the webcast will be available following the event at arts.gov. In addition, SiriusXM Channel 67, Real Jazz will audio broadcast the concert live.

Mark Rapp designated Columbia and state jazz ambassador

He's sold out Jazz at Lincoln Center four times and played the Blue Note in Greenwich Village. He's performed solo gigs in Vienna, Geneva, Boston, Washington, and – of course – New Orleans. He's taken the stage with Branford Marsalis, fellow South Carolinians Hootie and the Blowfish, Darius Rucker, and Edwin McCain, Wess “Warmdaddy” Anderson, and Delfeayo Marsalis. And according to a resolution by the S.C. House of Representatives, Mark Rapp is now also "Jazz Ambassador of Columbia and the State of South Carolina."  The resolution was presented to the accomplished jazz trumpeter in February by Reps. Beth Bernstein and Kirman Finlay and recognizes him as "master jazz musician, composer/arranger, and teacher" and lauds his many accomplishments. "I am humbled and excited by this recognition," Rapp said. "It not only reaffirms the foundations which Skipp Pearson built, but acknowledges my genuine dedication to the work of growing and serving our jazz community. "My mission is to grow, elevate, and expand the jazz community in and around Columbia through recordings, events, and education, creating a thriving scene for both the artists and our audiences.  I’m determined to enrich and advance the lives of our citizens and the culture of our communities through the wonderful art form of jazz." The designation was held by the late Skipp Pearson, also of Columbia, from 2002 until his passing in summer 2017.

Columbia jazz great Skipp Pearson dies

From The State Article by Dwaun Sellers

[caption id="attachment_31169" align="alignright" width="200"] photo by Andrew Haworth[/caption] Columbia musician Skipp “Pops” Pearson, a jazz institution in South Carolina, died after a years-long cancer battle. He was 80. Pearson, whose music career spanned more than 50 years, died Monday from organ failure due to complications caused by the advanced stages of bone cancer. He was surrounded by family and friends, according to a post from his foundation. His musical journey began on the drums, but fearing getting “kicked out of my mama’s house,” he switched to the sax. Louis Jordan and Earl Bostick were early influences, Pearson said in an interview years ago, but Pearson said he vividly remembered the first time he heard Charlie Parker. He and childhood friend John Williams had a competition over who could find the hippest records. “He called me and said, ‘I bet you ain’t heard this cat,’” Pearson says, eyes crinkling behind his glasses. It was Parker. “I thought that was the greatest thing I ever heard.” Pearson took private, 50-cent saxophone lessons as a sixth grader. He was leading The Rhythm Artists, a five-piece orchestra, at 15. Enlisting in the Air Force at 19 didn’t cramp Pearson’s style because he played everywhere he served. From Parker to Coltrane, Columbia native Lucky Thompson to Don Byas, Pearson listened to and learned from the greats. He played with some, too – among them Otis Redding, Wynton Marsalis, Paul McCarthy, Miles Davis and Sam Cooke. “Skipp is a legend. There’s no one more of a real deal than Skipp,” Mark Rapp, a Columbia jazz musician and friend of Pearson’s, said previously. “His tone, his phrasing, his ideas, his whole life embodies the truest essence of jazz music.” In addition to education programs and other activities to help young musicians, he received many honors from the state he called home. He was named the Ambassador of Jazz Music by the South Carolina Senate and House and was awarded the Order of the Palmetto, the state’s highest civilian honor. He also was inducted into the South Carolina State University Jazz Hall of Fame in 1998. The community rallied around Pearson in recent years as he battled bone cancer, holding fundraisers like the Skipp Pearson Jazz Bash and Love Fest to help fund initiatives for the jazz great. Former staff writer Otis Taylor contributed.

SC Jazz Festival turns 10 on Dizzy Gillespie’s 98th birthday

Dizzy Gillespie’s hometown of Cheraw, S.C., ushers in its 10th year of the South Carolina Jazz Festival Oct. 16-18 as the Cheraw Arts Commission presents three days of jazz and community activities. The weekend, which coincides with the 98th anniversary of Gillespie’s birth, will showcase the unique bond Gillespie shared with his South Carolina roots and jazz. A wide variety of both free and ticketed concerts and events are scheduled for Friday and Saturday, Oct. 16-17. This year’s festival will culminate on Sunday, Oct. 18 with a Jazz Brunch at G.W. Long Church at 11:30 a.m. followed by a Jazz Mass at 3 p.m. on the grounds of First Presbyterian Church. More than 30 jazz performances are scheduled during the festival. The concerts will feature regional musicians from both North Carolina and South Carolina and beyond. Featured artists for the ticketed evening performances at the Theatre on the Green will be the Ignacio Berroa Quartet on Friday and the Carol Welsman Trio on Saturday. Joining Ignacio on Friday will be saxophonist Skipp Pearson and trumpet player Mark Rapp. These South Carolina musicians along with the Ignacio Berroa Quartet will pay tribute to Gillespie by performing some of his jazz compositions. Ignacio was a percussionist in many of Dizzy Gillespie’s bands and defined by Gillespie as “….the only Latin drummer in the world of American music that intimately knows both worlds: his native Afro-Cuban music as well as Jazz…” International jazz pianist and vocalist Carol Welsman comes to the festival upon the release of her new CD “Alone Together” in August. Weekend activities include a Centennial Park performance by the Freedom’s Groove of the Army Ground Forces Band of Fort Bragg, North Carolina, “Dizzy on Display” at the Southern African American Heritage Center, a Bebop Parade, family art activities, late-night jazz crawls, a jazz breakfast, Bebop & Bites lunch and a wine tasting. Music and dialogue will be presented at the Gillespie family’s church home. Art abounds during the weekend with an exhibit by jazz artist Eric McCray of Raleigh, North Carolina, Gillespie-inspired artwork by local students, an Italian Madonnari chalk competition and art and fine crafts by regional artists. Attendees can enjoy a self-guided historic Cheraw cellphone tour to more than 25 points of interest, including Dizzy Gillespie-related sites. Tickets for a single evening concert at the Theatre on the Green are $30 per person and a two-day weekend ticket is $50 per person. For more information, call 843-537-8420, extension 12, or visit www.scjazzfestival.com for more information on ticket purchases, festival events, lodging and restaurants. The Cheraw Arts Commission is supported by the S.C. Arts Commission, which receives funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: Cheraw Arts Commission

Harbison Theatre’s Performance Incubator debuts “tapestry of jazz and modern dance”

Experience the beauty of live jazz matched with fluid, contemporary movement when The HT@MTC Performance Incubator debuts Woven: Life in Notes and Steps, composed by internationally touring, locally bred trumpeter Mark Rapp on Jan. 14, 2015, at 7:30 p.m. The event takes place at Midlands Technical College's Harbison Theatre in Irmo, S.C. In this one-of-a-kind tapestry of jazz and modern dance, jazz composer Rapp teams up with professional choreographer Stephanie Wilkins to meld choreography with improvisation, taking the audience on a life voyage through universal human experiences, from passion to despair, from questioning to acceptance. Woven was developed exclusively as part of The HT@MTC Performance Incubator. “Woven alludes to how everyone is connected in the giant web of life, like threads strung together,” said Rapp. “Each piece, each melody is choreographed, while the solos are improvised by both dancers and instrumentalists inspiring one another – creating an exciting, organic and unique artistic presentation each time.” During their professional careers in New York City, Rapp and Wilkins worked in the upper echelons of the performing arts industry. In Woven, their collective experiences are conveyed through an evening-length set of works featuring five jazz musicians and six modern dancers, portraying, through notes and steps, how we are all connected – woven – together in this fabric of life. Rapp has performed sold-out shows for audiences in New Orleans, New York City and Europe, playing in legendary venues such as The Blue Note and Joe’s Pub with top-tier musicians such as Branford Marsalis and Hootie and the Blowfish. In 2008, DownBeat Magazine listed Rapp on their short list of “Top emerging jazz trumpeters.” Rapp has since recorded four albums as a lead musician, including his critically acclaimed debut Token Tales (2009), and has been featured on various chart-topping jazz albums. Wilkins received her Masters of Fine Arts in Dance Performance and Choreography from NYU's Tisch School of the Arts in New York City, where she lived for 14 years. She has taught, choreographed and performed extensively in New York, San Francisco and Brazil, and has worked with many notable choreographers in NYC, including Bill T. Jones (as an apprentice), Bebe Miller and David Parsons. Wilkins has since returned to Columbia, S.C. and currently serves as an adjunct professor of dance and a choreographer for the USC Dance Company at the University of South Carolina. For ticket information, visit www.HarbisonTheatre.org or call (803) 407-5011. This project is funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts. About Harbison Theatre Rooted in the performing arts, Harbison Theatre at Midlands Technical College offers programs and productions that encourage reflection, examination and discovery; and that provide entertainment, education and opportunity to professionals, learners and community members in all stages of life. To learn about upcoming events, purchase tickets, or pursue sponsorship and volunteer opportunities with Harbison Theatre, visit www.HarbisonTheatre.org. About Midlands Technical College Midlands Technical College (MTC) is a comprehensive, two-year, public college serving Richland, Lexington and Fairfield counties of South Carolina. The fifth-largest higher education provider in South Carolina and the largest provider of transfer students to four-year colleges and universities in the state, MTC offers an excellent education at an excellent value. Serving approximately 18,000 academic credit students and 15,000 Corporate and Continuing Education students annually, MTC equips students with the tools they need to meet the challenges and opportunities of the modern work world. Learn more at midlandstech.edu. Via: Harbison Theatre

South Carolina Jazz Festival kicks off ninth year

CHERAW, S.C. — Music lovers from across the Carolinas are getting jazzed up for the 2014 South Carolina Jazz Festival, which is set to begin Friday with a performance from the Delfeayo Marsalis Quintet. “Each year, we try to make it bigger and better. One thing we’re all really excited about this year is the fact of who our main-event artists are on Friday evening and Saturday evening,” said David Sides, director of tourism and community development for the town of Cheraw. “If you’re into jazz at all, you’ve heard that Marsalis name. They’re synonymous with jazz.” Following the Delfeayo Marsalis Quintet’s show will be a performance from James Tormé, son of legendary singer and songwriter Mel Tormé on Saturday. “We’ve always had some incredible artists for the main events, but these guys are more nationally known,” Sides said. The three-day festival is in its ninth year. Supported by the S.C. Arts Commission and the the National Endowment for the Arts the South Carolina Jazz Festival blends art and music, featuring musicians and artists from throughout the area. More than 25 jazz performances are planned at venues including Centennial Park and the Theater on the Green as well as several local restaurants and businesses. The festival will also feature performances from area school groups, events for children and more. “It continues to grow a little bit more,” Sides said, “and to me, to get a little bit better.” The festival will include a number of events celebrating locally born jazz legend Dizzy Gillespie. At the festival, Gillespie will be portrayed by another native son of Cheraw, Joshua Campbell. “(Joshua is) a product of Cheraw,” said sides. “He’s a graduate of Cheraw High School (and) he’s now at Harvard. I think he’s in his junior year.” Many of the festival’s events are free to the public, but tickets for the main events are available now. Jazz fans can purchase tickets and see a full schedule of events by visiting www.scjazzfestval.com or by calling 843 -537-8421, extension 12.