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Gibbes Museum awarded grants to increase diversity

The Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston’s premier art museum, has been awarded three grants that aim to showcase more diverse voices and expand the canon of art history.

One comes courtesy of the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation and two from the Art Bridges Foundation. These grants have awarded funds to the Gibbes to support two exhibitions – the Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice exhibition currently on display and another exhibition slated for fall of 2023 that will draw parallels between the British Aestheticism movement of the late 19th century and the Charleston Renaissance, highlighting LGBTQIA+ influences on both movements.

The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation

The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation supports land conservation, artistic vitality and regional collections for the people of the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Chicago. The Gibbes was named one of 11 recipients of the foundation’s groundbreaking Broadening Narratives initiative, which aims to fund specific collections or projects that shed light on underrepresented stories. This grant, totaling $60,000, will aid the Gibbes in a special exhibition that will draw unprecedented parallels between two dynamic artists – 20th century Charleston Renaissance artist Edward “Ned” I.R. Jennings and author and illustrator Aubrey Beardsley, an icon of the British Aestheticism movement. In particular, the exhibit will consider the role of queer artists in the Charleston arts community at the time by exploring Jennings’ life and works. “At the Gibbes, we are committed to sharing artists from diverse backgrounds and experiences,” says Angela Mack, executive director of the Gibbes Museum of Art. “We are grateful and excited to put this grant toward continuing that mission with a special exhibition highlighting LGBTQIA+ artists with a focus on our Charleston arts community.”

Art Bridges Foundation

The Art Bridges Foundation grants, totaling $76,015, were awarded to the Gibbes to support exhibition costs, marketing and related programming associated with the Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice exhibition, now on view at the Gibbes until Aug. 7, 2022. This exhibition is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with support from the Art Bridges Foundation. William H. Johnson, a South Carolina native, painted his “Fighters for Freedom” series in the 1940s as a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers and performers who fought to bring peace to the world. Through their stories, he suggests that the pursuit of freedom is an ongoing interconnected struggle with moments of both triumph and tragedy. “The presentation of Johnson’s Fighters for Freedom not only reintroduces a major South Carolina-born artist to contemporary audiences, but also further strengthens a program of exhibitions addressing complex and lesser or unfamiliar narratives in visual art,” Mack said. “We are truly grateful for the partnership with Art Bridges to bring this exhibition, the first-ever presentation of this series, back to Johnson’s home state and to foster a more diverse and expanded canon of art history.”

About the Gibbes Museum of Art

Home to the Carolina Art Association, established in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art is recognized among the oldest arts organizations in the United States. Housing one of the foremost collections of American Art from the 18th century to the present, the museum’s mission is to enhance lives through art by engaging people of every background and experience with art and artists of enduring quality and by providing opportunities to learn, to discover, to enjoy and to be inspired by the creative process. For more information, visit www.gibbesmuseum.org.

Jason Rapp

Gibbes Museum posts accounting job

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Wednesday, February 9, 2022

Accounting coordinator

The full-time accounting coordinator is responsible for nonprofit accounting, payroll, and general bookkeeping duties for the Gibbes Museum of Art. Reporting to the director of finance, this position manages day-to-day accounting operations, including full-cycle accounts payable/receivable processes, bank reconciliations, general ledger maintenance, budgetary and audit preparation, among other critical duties to support the function of the finance department. The deadline to apply is Wednesday, February 9, 2022. Go here to download the job description and get application instructions.
Job postings on The Hub are considered expired once the deadline to apply, if given, lapses. Links provided might might also expire. Because The Hub is not a jobs board, listings are not removed once the deadline to apply passes.

Jason Rapp

Donnelley Foundation grants to help tell underrepresented stories

The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation (the Foundation)—which supports land conservation, artistic vitality, and regional collections for the people of the Lowcountry region of South Carolina and Chicago—announced the 11 recipients of the its groundbreaking “Broadening Narratives” initiative, which aims to fund specific collections projects that bring forward underrepresented stories.

This announcement represents the second round of organizations to receive the Broadening Narratives grant. The projects collectively illustrate BIPOC communities, LGBTQ+ perspectives, working-class narratives, small community experiences, as well as other underrepresented groups and viewpoints.  The three Lowcountry-based projects or organizations are Clemson University, the Gibbes Museum of Art, and The Educational Foundation of the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center. The eight Chicago-based organizations are the Bronzeville Black Chicagoan Historical Society, Chicago History Museum, Chicago Public Art Group, Lewis University, Muslim American Leadership Alliance, Puerto Rican Arts Alliance, South Side Community Art Center, and Trickster Cultural Center. Additionally, the foundation renewed its $25,000 grant to each of the five Broadening Narratives advisory groups that assisted with the formation of that funding initiative: the College of Charleston’s Lowcountry Digital Library, Southeastern Museums Conference, Black Metropolis Research Consortium, Chicago Collections Consortium, and the Chicago Cultural Alliance. “While the purpose of collections is to ensure that stories are preserved, many narratives are often overlooked because of decisions based on race, gender, sexual identity, educational background, economic or social status, or because they are perceived to be outside the conventional thinking of the day,” said David Farren, foundation executive director. “We are thrilled to announce these grant recipients and want to thank these organizations for being part of this new way forward in collections thinking that shifts focus from the processing of material objects to the telling of broader and more inclusive narratives.” The Lowcountry-based organizations and projects to be funded by Broadening Narratives:
  • Clemson University will partner with the nationally registered Seashore Farmers’ Lodge and the Sol Legare community to provide collections management training; conduct conservation assessment, treatment, and interpretation for objects in the collection; and develop manuals for ongoing care and management. The project will shed light on the site, which was once the heart and backbone of the early African-American community providing farmers aid and insurance in a time of need in the late 1800s and early 1900s.
“The historic African American community of Sol Legare in the Lowcountry of South Carolina is unique in the measures that community members have taken to interpret and preserve their history in the built environment and cultural objects,” says Dr. Jon Marcoux, director of Clemson's Historic Preservation program.  “The community’s historical importance has gone unrecognized in broader narratives of the Civil War, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and Civil Rights eras. The project has the authenticity of fourth-generation residents playing an intricate role in protecting hundreds of donated objects that represent the full 150-year-old history of Sol Legare. We are honored to partner with the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation to preserve and share this significant collection.”
  • The Gibbes Museum of Art will create an exhibition drawing parallels between noted Charleston Renaissance artist Ned Jennings and British Aesthete and artist Aubrey Beardsley, re-contextualizing the Renaissance by examining the historically taboo topic of LGBTQIA+ contributions to the art world, still largely untold in the South. In particular, the exhibit will consider the role of queer artists in the Charleston arts community and the influence of queer aesthetics on the Charleston Renaissance via an exploration of Jennings’ works and life.
“By considering the impact of the British Aestheticism movement of the late 19th century on one of Charleston’s most original artistic minds, Edward “Ned” I.R. Jennings, we’re able to engage in a long overdue conversation about the LGBTQIA+ influences, histories, and kinship networks that existed between World Wars I and II when the visual arts flourished; a period that would become known as the Charleston Renaissance,” Gibbes Museum of Art Executive Director Angela Mack said. “Thanks to the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation’s commitment to telling this story, we are able to reengage with the work of an artist whose life was tragically cut short and whose originality and impact for too long has been marginalized.”
  • The Educational Foundation of the University of South Carolina Lancaster’s Native American Studies Center (NASC) will continue its study of South Carolina’s Native American peoples, their histories, and their cultures by gathering oral histories, artifacts, and conducting research related to Lowcountry tribes. The Lowcountry was a significant site for Native American tribes across the region for trade and was a nexus for interaction with European settlers and enslaved Africans.
“Very little scholarly work has been done to document and preserve the living traditions of South Carolina Native Americans, particularly in the Lowcountry. The small, often isolated but vibrant Native communities have existed largely under the radar of outside scholars. Some members of these communities were enslaved by European colonists; others found their tribal communities driven to near extinction. Some identified, at times, as white; others were labeled as African American. With the generous support of the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, the NASC will help document, preserve, and share these rich cultural traditions maintained by the life experiences and in the memories of the elders and leaders of these communities,” said Dr. Stephen Criswell, NASC Director. Criswell, Hub readers might remember, is a 2018 recipient of the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award. The Gibbes Museum is a 2019 recipient of the South Carolina Governor's Award for the Arts. Readers curious about the Chicago-based grant recipients can read more about them here.
About Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation supports land conservation, artistic vitality, and regional collections for the people of the Chicago region and the Lowcountry of South Carolina. For over five years, the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation has convened five advisory groups to assist with the formation and execution of the Broadening Narratives funding initiative by providing important feedback, keeping the Foundation apprised of trends in the field, and serving as valuable connectors and conveners. The groups include Black Metropolis Research Consortium, Chicago Collections Consortium, Chicago Cultural Alliance, College of Charleston’s Lowcountry Digital Library, and the Southeastern Museums Conference. For more information on the Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation, visit www.gddf.org.

Jason Rapp

Gibbes Museum to exhibit Smithsonian collection of William H. Johnson works

A Black artist with South Carolina roots is the focus of the Gibbes Museum of Art's major spring exhibition.

[caption id="attachment_48950" align="alignright" width="319"] Harriet Tubman | ca. 1945 | William H. Johnson, American, 1901-1972. | Oil-on-paperboard | 28 7/8 x 23 3/8 | Click to enlarge.[/caption] The Charleston museum is set to present Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice from Jan. 21 until Aug. 7. This exhibition brings together 28 paintings by the South Carolina born artist, which have not been seen together for almost 75 years. Organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the exhibition will premiere at the Gibbes before a national tour. Additionally, the Gibbes will host special programming and an accompanying exhibition, A New Deal: Artists at Work, which includes works from the museum’s permanent collection by artists like Johnson that benefitted from the Works Progress Administration’s Federal Art Program in the 1930s. “Nearly 50 years ago, the Gibbes exhibited a collection by William H. Johnson – which was the first solo exhibition by a Black artist at the Gibbes,” Angela Mack, executive director of the Gibbes Museum of Art, said. “We are proud to once again showcase the work of this great American artist, who was born in South Carolina, and reflect on our commitment to feature artists from diverse backgrounds and experiences.” Drawn entirely from the collection of more than 1,000 works by Johnson given to the Smithsonian American Art Museum by the Harmon Foundation in 1967, this exhibition is the first-ever presentation of this series in Johnson’s home state of South Carolina. William H. Johnson painted his "Fighters for Freedom" series in the mid-1940s as a tribute to African American activists, scientists, teachers, performers and international heads of state working to bring peace to the world. Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice celebrates these fighters and their accomplishments while still acknowledging the realities of racism, violence and oppression that they faced and overcame. This series includes some familiar figures—Harriet Tubman, George Washington Carver, Marian Anderson and Mahatma Gandhi—as well as other lesser-known individuals whose equally-important determination and sacrifice have been eclipsed over time. The Gibbes will host these special programs to further analyze the themes in Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice:
  • Image Matters: Picturing Political and Cultural Leaders, Feb. 17 The Gibbes will host a virtual discussion about the influence of visual culture on how the population remembers and regards both contemporary and historical political and cultural leaders. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3F29qTf.
  • Gibbes on the Go: Florence County Museum, Feb. 22 Discover more about William H. Johnson in his hometown of Florence with the Gibbes. Curator Stephen Motte will lead guests on a special tour of Florence County Museum’s Kindred Spirit: The Personal Worlds of William H. Johnson. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3q26p15.
  • Mightier Than the Sword: Writing into History, March 10 Inspired by the exhibition, Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice, and in partnership with local, woman-owned bookstore Itinerate Literate, the Gibbes will discuss the historical influence of written discourse on social justice movements. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3JLhVFH.
  • Now Let Me Fly: Songs of Freedom and Transformation, March 31 Musical performances from New Muse will give voice to the heroic figures portrayed by William H. Johnson in the exhibit Fighters for Freedom. Guests will listen for hidden messages in songs from the Underground Railroad, hear new songs of freedom and transformation and lift their voices in call and response. For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3eYhuKg.
  • Literary Gibbes Book Club Discussion, April 9 Inspired by the works in Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice, the Gibbes will lead a discussion on acclaimed Congressman John Lewis’s stunning graphic novel “March.” For more information, visit https://bit.ly/3eUU2NU.
To accompany Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice, the Gibbes will exhibit A New Deal: Artists at Work. The museum is one of a select group of institutions across the country that houses works from the Federal Arts Project. During the Great Depression of the 1930s, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt launched his ambitious Works Progress Administration (WPA) programs that sent millions of unemployed Americans back to work, including more than 5,000 artists. From the WPA came the Federal Arts Project, which awarded opportunities to a diverse group of artists, including women, African Americans and recent immigrants from China, Russia and Germany. This monumental effort to put artists back to work resulted in a collection of artwork intended to capture the national spirit at the time and encourage creativity in the face of great challenges. A New Deal: Artists at Work is a collection of these works from a diverse group of artists during a very challenging time in American history. Fighters for Freedom: William H. Johnson Picturing Justice is organized by the Smithsonian American Art Museum with generous support from Art Bridges, Faye and Robert Davidson and the Jacob and Gwendolyn Lawrence Foundation.

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Tuning Up: Senate confirms new NEA chair + Black music

Good morning! 

"Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...
Dr. Maria Rosario Jackson to head NEA. On Saturday, the U.S. Senate confirmed President Joe Biden's nominee to chair the National Endowment for the Arts. Jackson is a 2013 appointee to the National Council on the Arts and is a tenured Institute Professor in the Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts (HIDA) at Arizona State University where she also holds an appointment in the Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions. A full bio is here. S.C. art museums take up Black music:
  • In conjunction with its Romare Bearden: Abstraction exhibition, Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston is set to present Improvised: A Hip Hop Experience. "Many artists are influenced by the music of their time. In the case of the abstract expressionists of the mid 20th century that music was Jazz. Improvisational and expressive, it inspired Jackson Pollack and Romare Bearden alike. At the Gibbes, we see Hip Hop as an extension of that improvisational tradition and are excited to partner with on air personality Kris Kalyn to host Improvised: A Hip Hop Experience that will have local and emerging Hip Hop artists responding to works in Romare Bearden: Abstraction." Tickets are available now. $35. Student pricing available.
  • Later in the month, Columbia Museum of Art will launch of More Than Rhythm: A Black Music Series, hosted by ethnomusicologist Dr. Birgitta Johnson on Saturday, Jan. 15, 2022, during the closing weekend of the 30 Americans exhibition. The series premieres (two additional dates are scheduled) with a sampling of diverse sacred choral textures that exist in the Black sacred music tradition. "Black music represents one of the oldest and broadest rivers that pours into America’s sonic ocean. Whether it be in pop or rock, classical or hip-hop, the history that the music of Black Americans affirms is key to its enduring popularity and influence across lines of race, gender, age, class, and even language," per a release.
The Hub is pleased to see leading arts institutions offering inclusive programming that further validates why they are both recipients of the Governor's Award for the Arts.

Jason Rapp

Looming deadlines for major art calls

Get 'em in, #SCartists!

  • 1858 Prize DEADLINE: Sunday, October 31, 2021
  • ArtFields DEADLINE: Monday, November 1, 2021

There are big prizes up for grabs in the South Carolina arts scene. Are you going for them?

ArtFields, operating out of Lake City in southern Florence County, is accepting submissions for its historic tenth year. ArtFields offers a unique combination of competition and celebration for Southeastern artists, so fittingly this call is open to artists 18 and older practicing in all media from 12 Southeastern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Lo,\uisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. This is an opportunity for part of $100,000 in cash prizes during the 2022 event taking place April 22-30. Accepted artwork is displayed all around our downtown—in spaces like boutiques, restaurants, barbershops, and more—to create a town-wide gallery. If you're unaware, click here to explore what ArtFields is all about and how you can be part of it. The submission deadline is Monday, Nov. 1. Not terribly far from Lake City as the crow flies is the South Carolina Lowcountry. The Charleston-based 1858 Society of the Gibbes Museum of Art has a call out for contemporary art. Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to apply. The winning artist receives $10,000 for work that contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. In addition to the monetary award, artwork will be chosen by the Gibbes Curatorial Team, in collaboration with the artist, for display in the Mary Jackson Modern and Contemporary Galleries for the duration of 2022. Their submission deadline is one day earlier on Sunday, Oct. 31. Find out more about the 1858 Prize here.

Jason Rapp

Apply to be a Gibbes Museum visiting artist

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. [caption id="attachment_47503" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Marina Savashynskaya Dunbar, Gibbes Museum Visiting Artist in 2021[/caption]


Complementing the Gibbes Museum's exhibition program, its Visiting Artist Series promotes creativity, introduces new art forms, provides perspective on larger community issues, encourages freedom of thought, and connects with the broadest possible audience.

[caption id="attachment_47504" align="alignright" width="250"] Alexandria Dickerson, Gibbes Museum Visiting Artist in 2021[/caption] The program features eight contemporary artists annually, whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Invitations are extended to emerging and nationally-recognized artists whose work aligns with the museum’s collection profile; whose work is in the collection; or who have been identified as a finalist or winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Fletcher Williams III, recent finalist for the South Arts Southern Prize as Hub readers know, was a 2019 visiting artist.

Starting Sunday, artists who currently reside in the South Carolina Lowcountry can apply for a six-week visiting artist session with a proposal introducing their current studio practice, artwork content, and the type of project they would like to pursue through a residency at the Gibbes Museum of Art.

  • Visiting artists receive a weekly honorarium of $250 plus a one-time materials stipend in the amount of $150.
  • Participating artists commit to 10 public studio hours per week during museum hours (usually divided across three days).
  • Following the residency, selected visiting artists now have the opportunity to exhibit works in the Ruth and Bill Baker Art Sales Gallery as well as collaborate on exclusive products to be sold in the Museum Store.
  • The application deadline is Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021 at 11:59 p.m.
Visiting artists are also encouraged to lead adult workshops and participate in virtual programs. For general questions, please contact Director of Contemporary Initiatives and Public Engagement Erin Glaze at eglaze@gibbesmuseum.org. For technical help while submitting your application, please contact SlideRoom at support@slideroom.com.

Jason Rapp

Want to be a Gibbes Museum visiting artist?

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Monday, May 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. [caption id="attachment_47088" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Past Visiting Artist Tim Hussey paints on unstretched canvas during his residency, Spring 2019.[/caption] Complementing our exhibition program, the Visiting Artist series promotes creativity, introduces new art forms, provides perspective on larger community issues, encourages freedom of thought, and connects with the broadest possible audience. The program features eight contemporary artists annually, whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Invitations are extended to emerging and nationally recognized artists whose work aligns with the museum’s Collection Profile; whose work is in the Collection; or who have been identified as a finalist or winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Artists who currently reside in South Carolina can apply for a 4-6 week Visiting Artist session with a proposal introducing their current studio practice, artwork content, and type of project they would like to accomplish through a residency at the Gibbes Museum of Art. For general questions, please contact Director of Contemporary Initiatives and Public Engagement Erin Nathanson at enathanson@gibbesmuseum.org. For technical help while submitting your application please contact SlideRoom at support@slideroom.com.

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Gibbes Museum of Art seeking accounting manager

Work for a Governor's Award-winner

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Tuesday, April 20, 2021
The Hub is not sure what's in the water between the Ashley and the Cooper, but today is—at least unofficially—Charleston arts jobs day here. The latest comes from our friends (and yes, grantees) at the Gibbes Museum of Art. Check it out, and stay tuned for one more post today about arts jobs. – Ed.
The accounting manager is responsible for performing highly specialized non-profit accounting work required to maintain the institution’s general ledger. Working under the direction of the CFO-Director of Finance, Administration & Operations, the accounting manager manages the daily activities of the accounting functions to record the revenues, expenditures, assets, and liabilities of the Gibbes Museum quickly and accurately. Should be a highly motivated self-starter and detail oriented. The position is also responsible for assisting the CFO in the annual financials and audit through our 3rd party audit firm.

Major responsibilities and duties

  • Manages the daily accounting activities required to maintain the general ledger. Work includes, but not limited to, check runs, accounts receivable, payroll, accounts payable transactions, recording of revenue and expenses, and etc.
  • Payroll Processing: Bi-monthly processing utilizing ADP, maintenance of leave and time reporting.
  • Maintains organized GL, set of detailed records & files of financial transactions.
  • Reviews general ledger balances monthly to ensure accuracy of posting.
  • Makes and implements recommendations to improve accounting processes and procedures. Performs other duties as assigned or required.
  • Shopify reporting, deposits and reconciliations with store coordinator.
The Gibbes, in conformity with applicable laws is an Equal Opportunity Employer and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, sex, sexual orientation, age, religion, national origin, or disability. Learn more on the Gibbes' careers page.

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Hub E-vents: Aug. 29

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

The Gibbes welcomes Latinx #SCartists

Two to participate in virtual town hall Well, obviously it's virtual since it caught the eye of Hub E-vents. "Ecos: Arte Urgente" is next up in a virtual town hall series presented by the Gibbes Museum of Art. Inspired by the new exhibition Building a Legacy: The Vibrant Vision Collection of Jonathan Green and Richard Weedman, this three-part series invites you to a town hall-style Zoom with local artists and community stakeholders to grapple with the effects of a global pandemic and a renewed reckoning with racial injustice. In Ecos, participants will join in conversation with #SCartists featured in the Charleston Oral History Program at the Citadel’s multimedia exhibit spotlighting the experiences of Latinx immigrants in the Lowcountry and in Building a Legacy. Participating artists are sculptor Diana Farfán of Greenville, Conway ceramicist and printmaker Paola Torres-Ruiz, and Cuban-born realist artist Reynier Llanes, who spent time in Charleston as a resident artist in Jonathan Green Studios but now lives in Miami. It's a free Zoom event open to the public, but it does requires registration. Learn more about the speakers and register here. Registrants will receive the Zoom link one day prior to the event, so don't delay.

Jason Rapp