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Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: Aug. 29

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

The Gibbes welcomes Latinx #SCartists

Two to participate in virtual town hall Well, obviously it's virtual since it caught the eye of Hub E-vents. "Ecos: Arte Urgente" is next up in a virtual town hall series presented by the Gibbes Museum of Art. Inspired by the new exhibition Building a Legacy: The Vibrant Vision Collection of Jonathan Green and Richard Weedman, this three-part series invites you to a town hall-style Zoom with local artists and community stakeholders to grapple with the effects of a global pandemic and a renewed reckoning with racial injustice. In Ecos, participants will join in conversation with #SCartists featured in the Charleston Oral History Program at the Citadel’s multimedia exhibit spotlighting the experiences of Latinx immigrants in the Lowcountry and in Building a Legacy. Participating artists are sculptor Diana Farfán of Greenville, Conway ceramicist and printmaker Paola Torres-Ruiz, and Cuban-born realist artist Reynier Llanes, who spent time in Charleston as a resident artist in Jonathan Green Studios but now lives in Miami. It's a free Zoom event open to the public, but it does requires registration. Learn more about the speakers and register here. Registrants will receive the Zoom link one day prior to the event, so don't delay.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: Anthology includes Boucher + art museums set reopening dates

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


  • Poet's Choice just announced that "A Perfect Night,” a poem by Clarence Carter Boucher, was selected for inclusion in the anthology A Childbirth Song or Poem. Boucher has been participating in SCAC programs since 1981. His residencies are often interdisciplinary, involving the visual arts, writing and music. Arts Access South Carolina, which provides arts experiences for people with disabilities, named him as a master teaching artist.
  • Two big names on the South Carolina art museum scene announced reopening plans in recent days. Visitors can peruse the collection at the Columbia Museum of Art starting June 16, and the Gibbes Museum of Art (Charleston) announced via email that it will welcome patrons starting June 1. Before going, make sure you're aware of safety precaution policies in place by checking each museum's website:

Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: May 22 (on May 21)

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

Here are some virtual arts events a day early for you planners

We see you. Sometimes we do events on the same day, sometimes we promo upcoming ones. Sometimes we do both. There are no rules in quarantine life! (Help yourself by reading all of them.)

Charleston Rhizome Collective/ConNECKtedTOO | 2 p.m.

How about some fun with the young arts lovers in the family?
Houses? Dolls? Now it's time for Recycle Cars, another family art lesson for children and families Friday, May 22 at 2 PM Eastern. These cars are made from household materials to limit trips to the store and waste! This image lists materials needed, but you can find them at the details link below. Go here for details and to join this event.

The Gibbes Museum of Art: Song and Spoken Word | 7 p.m.

Ann Caldwell performs "EXODUS: Bound for Freedom"
Ann Caldwell is a singer, song writer and story teller. She has the quiet energy of a windmill yet the soulful voice and power of a locomotive. Ann's rich, organic sound wraps around a note, then takes it and the listener to a different space in time. Caldwell brings a unique rhythm to every beat and word. A native of Denmark, S.C., and long-time resident of Charleston, Ann Caldwell brings with her the spirit of her ancestors who used music as a way to commune with each other and God. Originally scheduled to perform a garden concert at the Gibbes on May 6, she has created a new virtual performance entitled EXODUS: Bound for Freedom, and uses objects from the Gibbes collection to illustrate her stories and songs. View it tomorrow, Friday, May 22, at 7 p.m. on the Gibbes Museum's Facebook page (you do not need a Facebook account to watch).
Artist Statement: The dictionary defines Exodus as a mass departure of people [from one place to another], and my performance tells of the early journeys of the African American people. I chose to focus on the initial EXODUS that occurred when over 12.5 million Africans were captured transported to the New World for the purpose of slave labor--a journey called The Middle Passage. The journey from slavery to freedom (the Underground Railroad) was a second EXODUS, when enslaved Africans and African Americans risked life and limb to escape from the life of bondage and hard labor to go to a place where they could be free. These stories and songs illustrate the determination of my ancestors not to live their lives as enslaved people. No matter how difficult or perilous the journey, they would be forever Bound for Freedom.

Your event not here? Here's a little more on how Hub E-vents works.

Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: April 21, 2020

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

Here are some events for today

Tuning Up: The Lowcountry is hopping

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


You love to see it.

SCAC grantee Redux Contemporary Art Center in Charleston (FY20 General Operating Support) was the subject of the "Non-Profit Minute" from LowcountryBizSC late last week:

Verner Award recipients unite!

Verner Award recipients Nikky Finney (2016, Lifetime Achievement) and the Gibbes Museum of Art (2019, Organization) will collaborate tomorrow night, Feb. 19 at 6 p.m. Finney, along with author of Charleston-based novel The Cigar Factory Michele Moore and professor and director of southern studies at the College of Charleston Julia Eichelberger join the museum to consider the literary traditions and social landscape that gave rise to voices like Eudora Welty and Zora Neale Hurston. This event is inspired by the exhibition Central to Their Lives: Women Artists in the Johnson Collection and is designed to put the stories and experiences of southern women artists in dialogue with the experiences of southern women writers. Guests will also have an exclusive opportunity to purchase copies of Finney's newest publication Love Child's Hotbead of Occasional Poetry, which will not be available to the general public until April. Finney and Moore will be signing copies of their works after the program. Learn more about the speakers and register here. (Member, non-member, and student rates apply; 135 Meeting St., Charleston)

Artist Minute, Feb. 18

The Artist Minute is up on LowcountryBiz, and you will want to make sure you listen to and watch Quiana Parler of Ranky Tanky fame.

New faces hired at The Gibbes Museum of Art

Storied museum welcomes four

   
Katie Borges Special Events Manager Katie Borges coordinates the rentals at the Gibbes Museum of Art. Whatever the event, she will work with the clients, planners, and vendors, from the initial walk-through to the event itself, making sure that everything goes smoothly. Katie was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, and moved to Charleston to attend the College of Charleston, where she studied art history. After graduating, she moved to New York where she worked in public relations for a lifestyle firm. She has since moved back home to Charleston and combined her love for both art and events in her current role. Erin Nathanson Contemporary Initiatives and Visitor Engagement Consultant Erin Nathanson has expertise in the art of curating and the direction of special projects. With more than a decade of experience, Erin’s projects have actualized many artists’ work in the world and captured international media attention including Artforum, Hyperallergic, The Wall Street Journal, Playboy, American Photo Mag, Artsy, Artnet News and more. She graduated from the College of Charleston with a bachelor's in arts management in 2007, coordinated the City Gallery at Waterfront Park for five years, created the foundation for ArtFields in Lake City, South Carolina, and in 2015 founded The Southern, a contemporary art gallery dealing in recent works by artists connected to the American South. Erin’s role with the Gibbes Museum of Art will focus on contemporary initiatives and visitor engagement that support artists in the Southeastern region to include the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art, the visiting artist program, and product development for the museum store. Tommy Sanders Membership and Development Coordinator Tommy Sanders specializes in member relations and non-profit fundraising. He is a Charleston native and graduated from the College of Charleston in 2018 with a bachelor's in English. Prior to coming on board with the Gibbes Museum of Art, Tommy worked as a news clerk for the Post and Courier. Chase Quinn Program and Tour Coordinator A 2019 South Carolina Press Association award recipient, Chase Quinn is a writer, editor, public relations consultant and nonprofit program coordinator. Quinn will develop and support museum education, events and visitor enhancement initiatives. Before relocating to Charleston in 2016, Chase lived in New York City and worked as culture and programs associate at The Center for Constitutional Rights (CCR). He is originally from Wilmington, Delaware and studied at Boston University. His writing portfolio includes contributions to top literary and culture publications including Bon Appetit, Vanity Fair, HUFFPOST, Artforum, The Guardian US and Guernica.
The Gibbes Museum of Art received the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Award for the Arts in the organization category in May 2019.

2019’s 1858 Prize finalists announced by Gibbes Museum of Art

Winner to be announced later this month

Finalists include one #SCartists

1858 Prize logo
The Gibbes Museum of Art is pleased to announce the finalists for the annual 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. The 2019 finalists are Damian Stamer, Donte’ K. HayesStephanie Patton, Martha Clippinger, Michi Meko and South Carolina's Herb Parker, an installation artist. One of these artists, whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South, will be presented a $10,000 cash prize and have one selected artwork exhibited in the contemporary and modern galleries for the duration of 2020. “This year we were forced to choose six finalists due to the outstanding caliber of candidates we received,” said Angela Mack, executive director at the Gibbes Museum of Art. “Each of these finalists embodies an artist on the forefront of southern contemporary art. The 1858 prize embodies everything that the Gibbes stands for, and this years’ nominees truly impressed us.” This year, more than 200 artists across the Southeast submitted applications. The winner will be announced by the end of November and celebrated at the Amy P. Coy Forum and Prize Party hosted by Society 1858 at the Gibbes on Feb. 6-7, 2020 in Charleston. The forum will bring together artists and experts for a conversation about the impact of contemporary art in the South followed by a reception celebrating the 2019 winner.

2019 Finalists

Damian Stamer Damian Stamer (b. 1982) is a North Carolina based painter. In an ongoing series, the artist captures old barns, however picturesque and quaint, that stand as remnants of American industries founded upon slavery and exploitation. Time is visible here. Quiet moments approach the sublime when afternoon light rakes the grain of a fallen beam, or cloud-like stuffing erupts from a rotten chair. Violent and tender, this beauty hinges on the delicate nature of existence. These remnants are, like us, soaked with impermanence. We cannot escape a similar fate. Damian Stamer has exhibited extensively in the Southeastern United States as well as internationally in Tokyo, Japan and Budapest, Hungary. His work is in the permanent collection of The Mint Museum and the North Carolina Museum of Art. He is represented by SOCO Gallery in Charlotte, North Carolina and Bridgette Mayer Gallery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Donte’ K. Hayes Donte’ K. Hayes is a Georgia based ceramicist. Through the influence of hip-hop, history, and science fiction, the artist’s artwork explores themes in Afrofuturism, a projected vision of an imagined future which critiques the historical and cultural events of the African Diaspora and the distinct black experience of the Middle Passage. While also delving into deeper social issues which broaden the conversation between all of humanity. From these ideas, his art practice is based on research and references the visual traditions from the American South, the Caribbean, and the African continent. Hayes works in clay as a historical and creative base material to inform memories of the past. Ceramics becomes a bridge to conceptually integrate disparate objects and or images for the purpose of creating new understandings and connections with the material, history, and social-political issues. These ceramic objects are vessels, each making symbolic allusions to the black body. Donte’ K. Hayes has exhibited extensively across the Southern United States as well as internationally in London, England. He is the recent recipient of full tuition residencies at the Watershed Center for the Ceramic Arts in Newcastle, Maine and Haystack Mountain School of Crafts in Deer Isle, Maine. His artwork is in the permanent collection of the Zuckerman Museum of Art, Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, Georgia and Spruill Arts Center, Atlanta, Georgia. Hayes is a 2020 Forthcoming Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) Degree Candidate, School of Art and Art History, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. Herb Parker Herb Parker (b. 1953) is a South Carolina based installation artist. His nature-based installations, which began in the mid-seventies, are created to enhance a viewer’s perception of the environment and our relationship with nature. These environmental installations evolved from the artist’s thoughts on the mechanism of natural systems in time. This series serves as an ephemeral memento to the resilience of nature and an affirmation of the continuum of systems within the natural order.  Parker’s nature-based installations speak in a hybrid language from three distinct realms: architecture, sculpture and landscape.  His thoughts revolve around time, movement, history, culture, community, dialogue, spirituality, entropy and regeneration. The architectural situations created have recurring motifs that include; sanctuary, labyrinth, the golden ratio, and a place for dialogue. Herb Parker hopes to achieve a synthesis of systems from the natural world in the service of architectonic ideals. Herb Parker is a professor of art at the College of Charleston since 1991. He was awarded the South Arts South Carolina Fellowship, South Arts, Atlanta, Georgia in 2017. Parker’s nature-based installations have taken him all over the world, most recently to create “Sami Dialogue,” Landart in Alingsas, Nolhaga Park in Alingsas, Sweden and to participate in the 8th Geumgang Nature Art Biennale, Mt. Yeonmi, in Gongju, Korea. Martha Clippinger Martha Clippinger (b. 1983) is a North Carolina based multi-media artist. Clippinger’s work blurs the lines between painting and sculpture, fine art and folk, craft and design. The artist intuitively explores color, geometry, and texture while constructing dimensional paintings from scraps of wood and sewing quilts from reclaimed fabrics. Clippinger embraces the inherent imperfections of found materials and integrates them into the off-kilter geometries and irregular symmetries of their designs. A curiosity to learn about different materials engages the artist in a variety of processes. Clippinger’s developed a visual vocabulary of colors, shapes, and which forms across a range of media that includes not only wooden constructions and quilts, but also woolen weavings and ceramics. The painted constructions, while modest in scale, occupy a space beyond their physical dimensions, and the large, woolen tapestries shift from wall to floor and back again.  Clippinger uses these objects to play with architecture and draw attention to the relationship between the artwork and its surrounding. Martha Clippinger most recently exhibited with Elizabeth Harris Gallery in NYC, Philadelphia’s Magic Gardens in Philadelphia, PA, and Hodges Taylor in Charlotte, NC. Her practice and work was featured in Burnaway’s September editorial “Take Five: Textiles.” She has instructed at Duke University, NC and Penland School of Craft, NC. Michi Meko Michi Meko is a Georgia based multi-media artist. In the summer of 2015, they almost drowned. Inviting this life changing event’s influence into the artist’s studio practice, Meko’s recent paintings and sculptures focus on the African American experience of navigating public spaces while remaining buoyant within them. Meko’s work contributes to an important conversation, reflecting upon the African American experience in public spaces. Now more visible and open with the evidence and sharing offered by social media. This barrage of images simulates the experience of drowning under the heavy weight of ten thousand pounds of pressure while being held to the ocean’s floor. Michi Meko’s work uses a visual language of naval flags and nautical wayfinding, combined with romanticized objects of the American South as a means to communicate the psychological and the physical. These references signal the warning of a threat or the possibility of safe passage. Working beyond the physical image of the body, objects of buoyancy and navigation become metaphors for survival. Michi Meko’s most recent selected solo exhibitions include Chimento Contemporary in Los Angeles, CA and the Alan Avery Art Company in Atlanta, GA. In 2017, Meko was awarded the Joan Mitchell Painters and Sculptors Grant. His work lives in the permanent collection of the High Museum of Art, GA among many private collections. Stephanie Patton Stephanie Patton (b. 1969) is a Louisiana based multi-media artist. Humor plays an important role in the artist’s work. Often using it as a device to bring attention to critical issues including an exploration of mental and physical health, themes of healing, comfort and self-preservation. As a child of a parent afflicted with mental illness, Patton can speak of the misunderstood nature of this disease and the taboos associated with it. Through this experience, Patton gravitates towards materials and processes that best addresses their conceptual concerns and often allude to various emotional states. Mattress quilting can suggest ideas related to birth, death, intimacy, relationships, illness and rest. Patton also uses vinyl in sculptural relief work for its physical properties as well as for its inherent references to mental and physical health and protection. Patton’s work often addresses psychological themes while exploring the relationship between humor and personal therapies. Stephanie Patton was recently selected as South Arts 2019 Southern Prize and State Fellows. Patton’s work exhibited at Art Miami, Miami, FL with Arthur Roger Gallery and the New Orleans Museum of Art, LA. This year, Patton was the Artist-in-Residence for the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, LA, June – July. Stephanie Patton’s work lives in private and public permanent collections including the New Orleans Museum of Art, LA, and the Frederick R. Weisman Foundation, Los Angeles, CA. The 2019 panelists included 2018 Prize Winner Dr. Leo Twiggs, Society 1858 representatives Emily Broome and Jay Benson, Artist/Curator Alex Paik, Birmingham Museum of Art Curator Hallie Ringle and Spelman Museum of Fine Art Curator Anne Collins Smith. For more information, visit www.1858prize.org.

About Society 1858

The 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art is presented by Society 1858, a member auxiliary group of the Gibbes Museum of Art. This group of dynamic young professionals supports the Gibbes Museum with social and educational programs tailored for up-and-coming art patrons. To learn more about membership in Society 1858, please visit www.gibbesmuseum.org.

About the Gibbes Museum of Art

Home to the Carolina Art Association, established in 1858, the Gibbes Museum of Art is recognized among the oldest arts organizations in the United States. Housing one of the foremost collections of American Art from the 18th century to the present, the museum’s mission is to enhance lives through art by engaging people of every background and experience with art and artists of enduring quality and by providing opportunities to learn, to discover, to enjoy and to be inspired by the creative process. For more information, visit www.gibbesmuseum.org.

Tuning Up: A new day at SCAC + Florence 3 arts grant

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


You're forgiven if you thought this feature was lost to the sands of time. It doesn't look like we've had a "Tuning Up" since June. Time to fix that!
  • IT'S A NEW DAY. Last week brought the news that the S.C. Arts Commission wants to serve constituents now based on what you need rather than by where you're located. Today's the day the new system is in effect. Callers to the agency will get a new menu of options, and visitors to our website can solicit staff assistance in a new way too.
  • FLORENCE 3 GETS GRANTS FOR ARTS PROJECT. "The Distinguished Art Program grant is for the project 'Innovate – Creative and Critical Thinking through the Arts.' More than 3,000 students and 238 teachers will benefit from this grant program." Go here for the full story on SCNow.com. The grant comes from the S.C. Dept. of Education.
  • KEEP TURNING, DORIAN. At this writing, Hurricane Dorian's track appears to be continuing its ever-so-gradual shift eastward and away from the S.C. coast. You don't need The Hub to tell you that's good news, but we can tell you word's come in that 2019 Verner Award recipients the Gibbes Museum of Art plus College of Charleston's Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art—among many others—are closed as the storm makes its way along the coast. The closings are in response to mandatory coastal evacuations. Be safe out there, and definitely be ArtsReady: visit SouthCarolinaArts.com for resources to help you do just that.
 

Submitted material

Submissions open for $10,000 1858 Prize

Prize honors contemporary Southern art

Submissions open Aug. 1 through Oct. 1, 2019
The Gibbes Museum of Art is pleased to announce the 2019 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Each year, the 1858 Prize is presented by Society 1858, a member auxiliary group of the Gibbes Museum of Art comprised of young professionals. The $10,000 cash prize is awarded to one artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South. Past winners include Leo Twiggs (2018), Bo Bartlett (2017), Alicia Henry (2016), Deborah Luster (2015), Sonya Clark (2014), John Westmark (2012), Patrick Dougherty (2011), and Radcliffe Bailey (2010). Submissions for 2019 will be accepted online at www.1858prize.org from Aug. 1-Oct. 1, 2019. "For more than 10 years, Society 1858 has celebrated a diverse number of southern artists through the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art,” says Molly Waring, President of Society 1858. “This year, we are pleased to announce the call for submissions to help further our mission of supporting contemporary artists from the south whose works present a new understanding of art in the region." Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia are eligible to apply. All submissions are thoughtfully reviewed by a panel of visual arts professionals, Society 1858 representatives, and Gibbes Museum of Art staff members. Artists must submit:
  • completed registration form
  • brief artist statement (150 words or less)
  • résumé or CV
  • portfolio of work (up to 10 images) including title, date, medium, and dimensions for each work
  • $25 non-refundable entry fee
  • submit at www.1858prize.org
For general questions about the 1858 Prize, please contact the Gibbes Museum of Art at 1858prize@gibbesmuseum.org For technical support while submitting your application, please contact SlideRoom at support@slideroom.com Finalists will be announced in October and the winner will be announced in fall 2019 on the 1858 Prize website and via press release. The winner will be celebrated at the Amy P. Coy Forum and Prize Party hosted by Society 1858 at the Gibbes on February 6 & 7, 2020 in Charleston.

All you need to know about S.C. Arts Awards Day

14 recipients to be honored May 1

  • Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts, Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award presented at ceremony
  • S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon & Art Sale to follow

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two awards honoring high arts achievement in South Carolina will be presented to 14 recipients Wednesday, May 1, 2019 during South Carolina Arts Awards festivities at the UofSC Alumni Center in Columbia. The South Carolina Arts Awards, sponsored by Colonial Life, are a joint presentation of the South Carolina Arts Commission, South Carolina Arts Foundation, and McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina to award the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts and Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards.

Awards Ceremony

Both awards will be presented at the awards ceremony at the UofSC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia), which begins with a reception from 10-10:45 a.m. The official ceremony begins at 11 a.m. S.C. Arts Commission Board Chairman Henry Horowitz and Executive Director Ken May will be joined by South Carolina First Lady Peggy McMaster to present the awards to each recipient. Nine recipients from their respective categories are being recognized with Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts for outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina:
  • ARTIST: Tyrone Geter, Elgin
  • INDIVIDUAL: Kathleen Bateson, Hilton Head Island
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION (Individual): Simeon A. Warren, Charleston
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION (Organization): South Carolina African American Heritage Commission, Hartsville
  • BUSINESS: Hampton III Gallery, Taylors
  • GOVERNMENT: Florence County Museum, Florence
  • ORGANIZATION: The Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston
  • ORGANIZATION (Special Award): Town Theatre, Columbia
  • LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT: Cecil Williams, Orangeburg
Four artists and one advocate are being recognized with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award as practitioners and advocates of traditional arts significant to communities throughout the state. Their traditions embody folklife’s dynamic, multigenerational nature, and its fusion of artistic and utilitarian ideals. They are:
  • John Andrew “Andy” Brooks (Liberty): Old-Time Music
  • Dorothy Brown Glover (Lincolnville): Quilting
  • Julian A. Prosser (Columbia): Bluegrass Music
  • The Voices of Gullah Singers (St. Helena Island): Gullah Singing
  • Dale Rosengarten, Ph.D. (McClellanville): Advocacy, African-American Lowcountry Basketry & Southern Jewish Heritage
McKissick Museum will celebrate this year’s Folk Heritage Award recipients at a mixer Tuesday, April 30 from 6-8 p.m., at the Blue Moon Ballroom (554 Meeting St, West Columbia). Admission is free for McKissick members or $5 for non-members. RSVP’s can be made, or tickets purchased, by going here. For more information, or to RSVP or purchase a ticket over the phone, call 803.777.2876.

S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon & Art Sale

The S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients afterward during a fundraising luncheon at the UofSC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia). Works by South Carolina will be on sale from 11 a.m. to noon, with proceeds supporting S.C. Arts Commission programs. The luncheon program is expected to run from 12:30 to 2 p.m.
  • Unique ikebana flower arrangements, in partnership with Ikebana International Chapter #182 of Columbia, will serve as table centerpieces. Each arrangement, available for sale, will be presented in an included, original vase crafted by a South Carolina artisan.
  • Art experiences will also be sold.
  • The keynote speaker will be S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May, retiring at the end of June 2019 after 33 years at the agency and the past nine as its leader, giving a “State of the Arts” message.
  • Luncheon tickets are $50 per person and available for purchase through SouthCarolinaArts.com or by calling 803.734.8696.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.