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Jason Rapp

Wallace Foundation grant opportunity for arts orgs of color

$2-3 million possible for selected orgs

Researchers sought too

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, August 20, 2021 Seeking Arts Organizations of Color, Apply by 8/20/2021 to join first group of grantees

When facing strategic challenges, how can and do arts organizations of color leverage their experience and histories of community orientation to increase their resilience, while sustaining their relevance?

The Wallace Foundation is currently seeking eligible arts organizations of color* to join in a new initiative that will explore this question​. The initiative will explore the links between relevance, resilience and community orientation—"what we are envisioning as a deep sense of understanding of and belonging to the community/communities that the organization serves." They are also seeking researchers to study the organizations' efforts. While pursuing individual projects to address their own strategic challenges, the organizations will share what they are learning with one another and with researchers who will document their progress and histories. * For the purposes of this open call, The Wallace Foundation uses the term ‘arts organizations of color’ to describe organizations that were founded by and for communities of color. Wallace recognizes that no one umbrella term can accurately represent the plurality and diversity of arts organizations that serve communities of color, including Black, Indigenous, Hispanic/Latinx, Arab American, Asian American or Pacific Islanders.

Jason Rapp

SCAC commitments to DEI, rural aided by grant from Coastal Community Foundation of S.C.

$14,339 grant expands agency work in Lowcountry


For Immediate Release

COLUMBIA, S.C. – A grant awarded to the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) by Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina (CCF) supported commitments to expanding diversity, equity, and inclusion and reaching rural communities.

Visit the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina's website at https://coastalcommunityfoundation.org/That perfectly complements the SCAC’s new strategic plan, released in late 2020, which calls for it to “promote equitable access to the arts” through a renewed focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Additionally, the agency has a commitment to expanding arts opportunities in rural communities through such initiatives as its nationally recognized program The Art of Community: Rural SC. Extenuating circumstances in FY19 led to $500 from that year’s Expansion Arts Fund award being held over to FY20, bringing that year’s funding to $14,839. This is how the funds were distributed by the SCAC:
  • Aldwyth, an individual artist in Beaufort County, was granted $2,500 to support the creation of works for Pictures of Nothing or Mr. Varnedoe, Why Abstraction?, a multi-disciplinary exhibition focused on Kirk Varnedoe’s book, Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art Since Pollock. Pandemic restrictions continue to postpone the public display of the works created by Aldwyth and an assistant.
  • Fletcher Williams, an individual artist in Charleston County, was granted $2,500. He worked with a local fabricator and a team of assistants to create the mobile walls for his Picket Fence – Promiseland Consisting of sculpture and large-scale paper art, the installation encouraged visitors to imagine and observe the Aiken-Rhett House as possibly seen through different eyes, times, and sets of experiences. Though delayed, the project opened and was used as a tool to address current events, serving both artistic and social-awareness goals while engaging new patrons who may have previously been unaware of or disinterested in the arts.
  • Marlanda Dekine, an individual artist in Georgetown County, received $2,500 for research related to the experiences of the artist as a Gullah-Geechee descendant living in South Carolina “with a rootedness in Africana & Caribbean being and creolization.” Written and recorded interviews, community engagement, and tours of local museums and plantations assisted in the completion of written-word poetry. The culmination of this work is to be a serial poem offered through spoken word as a site-specific soundscape, or aural architecture, as well as in live performances for the community, with discourse and audience interaction as part of the final product. In this context, Dekine acts as a conduit and witness of present, past, and future.
  • Community arts organization Colleton Museum, Farmers Market and Commercial Kitchen in Colleton County received $7,339 from the Expansion Arts Fund to support the development of WHAM!, Walterboro History, Art, & Music, a new public festival. They’ve used an indefinite delay to reexamine how they implement content for the rural community they serve. By reconceptualizing the initial project, they’ve seen increased interest from artists representing a broader segment of the community and now have a more flexible framework that can be used and reused at any time.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

The mission of the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina. We envision a South Carolina where the arts are valued and all people benefit from a variety of creative experiences. A state agency created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas: arts education, community arts development, and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the SCAC is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. Visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696, and follow @scartscomm on social media.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: NFL features S.C. artist, new Orangeburg Co. FAC website

Good morning! 

"Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...
It's a cold damp morning, and more coffee is in order. Grab yourself a cuppa and check out these tidbits:
  • New Year, New You Website. The Hub got word yesterday that Orangeburg County Fine Arts Center just introduced a new-look OrangeburgArts.com for the new year. If you have ever been involved with such a project, you know that they deserve kudos for this undertaking (IYKYK, as the kids say). The home page uses eye-catching images to drive home their mission and uses other pages to highlight 14 area communities and artists who call the area home. Great work!
  • Game recognize game. The NFL playoffs began this past weekend (and abruptly ended for The Hub Sunday night). Maybe not the most important thing on most Hub readers' radars, but the NFL rolled out a new program, NFL Artist Replay, to bring recognition to BIPOC artists. One happened to be Ija Charles, whom the league asked to contribute to Artist Replay. #SCartists' Charles is known around the Midlands for mural work in Cayce, West Columbia and the Richland Library Main branch. Her work for the NFL is below, and you can read more and watch video from WLTX TV 19.
[caption id="attachment_46148" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Ija Charles' work for NFL Artist Replay. Ija Charles' work for NFL Artist Replay. Image courtesy of WLTX.com.[/caption]

Submitted material

Major new funding initiative to illuminate underrepresented narratives

Foundation's grants to fund Lowcountry collections

Application deadline: Friday, March 26, 2021

The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation (the Foundation) announced the launch of a major new collections funding initiative to help museums, libraries, and other collecting organizations bring forward new and recovered narratives within its two geographies: Chicago and the Lowcountry of South Carolina.

The Foundation has allocated $750,000 for grants to organizations whose collections illustrate BIPOC communities, LGBTQ+ perspectives, working-class narratives, small community experiences, as well as other underrepresented groups and viewpoints. Emerging, compelling, underrepresented perspectives reflective of collections in the areas of science, public health and the natural world also are eligible. Any Chicago or Lowcountry based non-profit organization with a relevant collection is encouraged to learn more about the strategy at gddf.org. The first deadline for applications is March 26, 2021. Collections traditionally have ensured that stories are preserved, added to, revisited, and reconsidered in context of the past, the present, and the future. Some narratives, however, have been less valued or overlooked because of decisions based—consciously or subconsciously—on race, gender, sexual identity, educational background, economic or social status, or because they are perceived to be unpopular, divisive or outside the conventional thinking of the day. This new funding initiative is designed to be part of a new way forward in collections thinking as it shifts focus from the care and processing of material objects to the telling of broader and more inclusive narratives and perspectives through collections. “The launch of this ‘broadening narratives’ initiative arrives serendipitously as our country faces a historic moment of social justice reawakening and a compelling need for these trusted institutions to engage with the public on science-based realities, whether Covid-19 or climate change,” said David Farren, executive director of the Foundation. “With this new strategy, we will recognize and be responsive to the emerging opportunities, challenges, and narratives of both the Lowcountry and Chicago regions.” Chicago’s broad tapestry of ethnic groups is reflective of the city’s industrial and commercial history and the immigration and migration it sparked, while the Lowcountry’s history is rooted in the country’s oldest experiences of race and power. Applicants for the new funding will be asked to demonstrate how the proposed effort may add to these regional narratives and amplify overlooked voices and perspectives from the past, contribute to a better informed present, or lead to a more inclusive, sustainable and healthier future.
An organization will be eligible to apply as long as collections are a significant part of their mission—though it need not be their primary mission—and they have resources dedicated to the ongoing care, management, and sharing of the collection. Those who work with the collections may include creatives, individual artists, curators, historians, teachers, social activists, researchers, scientists, and more, though grants will be made only to organizations. For over three years, the Foundation has convened five advisory groups to assist with the formation of this new funding initiative by providing important feedback, keeping the Foundation apprised of trends in the field, and serving as valuable connectors and conveners. The groups include Black Metropolis Research Consortium, Chicago Collections Consortium, Chicago Cultural Alliance, the College of Charleston’s Lowcountry Digital Library, and the Southeastern Museums Conference. “Working with the Foundation on this strategy has highlighted the value of collaboration and deliberation among diverse collections organizations and their potential to amplify marginalized voices,” said Marcia Walker-McWilliams, executive director of Black Metropolis Research Consortium. “There is an urgent need for more inclusive and informed spaces of engagement within the field. We have worked tirelessly to discover where this new initiative is needed most, and are eager to carry those discoveries into the next phase with our fellow advisory groups and the Foundation.” “The opportunity to work with Donnelley Foundation staff and a diverse group of professionals who shared a common passion for arts, culture, preservation and inclusive narratives was truly rewarding. The conversation, camaraderie, equity and acceptance of all voices among our working group helped define the 'broadening narratives' strategy,” said Zinnia Willits, executive director, Southeastern Museums Conference. “As a museum professional, my own concept of collection preservation was expanded by this initiative as the process evolved to place collection care in a much broader context. I am excited to see how institutions reconsider the art and artifacts they hold and develop projects that offer opportunities to reveal untold histories that deserve to be shared broadly, create connections between museums and the communities they serve and develop lasting connections and intentional communities of practice among those who have the great privilege to preserve, protect and amplify these diverse histories.”

Jason Rapp

Let’s raise up South Carolina’s ‘Emerging Leaders of Color’

Promoting representative leadership + equity in the arts

Application deadline: Friday, April 17, 2020, 11:59 p.m. ET
Two regional arts organizations, the South Carolina Arts Commission's partner and collaborator South Arts and WESTAF (Western States Arts Federation), are selecting up to 13 participants for the southern pilot of WESTAF's Emerging Leaders of Color (ELC) program. South ArtsWESTAF's ELC program has shown success in "attracting, training, networking and promoting a new generation of diverse arts leaders since 2010," according to South Arts, who hope to bring that energy to the Deep South states of Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Selected individuals will participate in a 3-day, 2-night executive-level professional development and team-building workshop at no cost to themselves. The program is designed to: 
  • Build a cohort of cultural leaders of color in the southeastern U.S. who are committed to the advancement of the arts. 
  • Engage diverse emerging leaders in coursework and activities designed to strengthen competencies and prepare participants for leadership positions in the field. 
  • Provide opportunities for promising arts professionals to establish networks that support their careers and the cultural interests of the communities they represent and serve. 
  • Deepen participants’ understanding of the arts in the United States and how public support sustains the vibrancy of the sector.   
The intensive development and team-building sessions will take place* July 8-10, 2020 in Atlanta.

So who makes a good candidate?

Self-identified leaders of color residing in one of the seven states listed above with fewer than 10 years of experience working in the arts who are also (most likely, but with exceptions) younger than 35. Good candidates can be employed as a cultural worker, arts/cultural programs administrator or be a significantly arts-interested community member such as a volunteer or a public official (the program is not designed to serve individual artists). They also must not have had an opportunity to participate in high-quality professional development sessions.  The application, found at this link, must be submitted through Formstack. The deadline is Friday, April 17. Applicants will be asked for your contact information, and a written/audio/video (your choice) response to this prompt: #InequalityIsJeff Chang on race, culture, and inequality. Applicants are also required to upload a letter of endorsement from a colleague as a PDF.  For more information about the Emerging Leaders of Color Program, contact Mollie Quinlan-Hayes with South Arts, mquinlanhayes@southarts.org, 404.874.7244 x 31, or Chrissy Deal with WESTAF, chrissy.deal@westaf.org, 303.629.1166. * Until further notice, of course.
The South Carolina Arts Commission is proud to further its own efforts to increase diversity, equity, and inclusion by spreading the word about the ELC program in South Carolina to enrich the applicant pool and, we hope, get at least one South Carolinian among the southern cohort.