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Jason Rapp

SCAC commitments to DEI, rural aided by grant from Coastal Community Foundation of S.C.

$14,339 grant expands agency work in Lowcountry


For Immediate Release

COLUMBIA, S.C. – A grant awarded to the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) by Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina (CCF) supported commitments to expanding diversity, equity, and inclusion and reaching rural communities.

Visit the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina's website at https://coastalcommunityfoundation.org/That perfectly complements the SCAC’s new strategic plan, released in late 2020, which calls for it to “promote equitable access to the arts” through a renewed focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion. Additionally, the agency has a commitment to expanding arts opportunities in rural communities through such initiatives as its nationally recognized program The Art of Community: Rural SC. Extenuating circumstances in FY19 led to $500 from that year’s Expansion Arts Fund award being held over to FY20, bringing that year’s funding to $14,839. This is how the funds were distributed by the SCAC:
  • Aldwyth, an individual artist in Beaufort County, was granted $2,500 to support the creation of works for Pictures of Nothing or Mr. Varnedoe, Why Abstraction?, a multi-disciplinary exhibition focused on Kirk Varnedoe’s book, Pictures of Nothing: Abstract Art Since Pollock. Pandemic restrictions continue to postpone the public display of the works created by Aldwyth and an assistant.
  • Fletcher Williams, an individual artist in Charleston County, was granted $2,500. He worked with a local fabricator and a team of assistants to create the mobile walls for his Picket Fence – Promiseland Consisting of sculpture and large-scale paper art, the installation encouraged visitors to imagine and observe the Aiken-Rhett House as possibly seen through different eyes, times, and sets of experiences. Though delayed, the project opened and was used as a tool to address current events, serving both artistic and social-awareness goals while engaging new patrons who may have previously been unaware of or disinterested in the arts.
  • Marlanda Dekine, an individual artist in Georgetown County, received $2,500 for research related to the experiences of the artist as a Gullah-Geechee descendant living in South Carolina “with a rootedness in Africana & Caribbean being and creolization.” Written and recorded interviews, community engagement, and tours of local museums and plantations assisted in the completion of written-word poetry. The culmination of this work is to be a serial poem offered through spoken word as a site-specific soundscape, or aural architecture, as well as in live performances for the community, with discourse and audience interaction as part of the final product. In this context, Dekine acts as a conduit and witness of present, past, and future.
  • Community arts organization Colleton Museum, Farmers Market and Commercial Kitchen in Colleton County received $7,339 from the Expansion Arts Fund to support the development of WHAM!, Walterboro History, Art, & Music, a new public festival. They’ve used an indefinite delay to reexamine how they implement content for the rural community they serve. By reconceptualizing the initial project, they’ve seen increased interest from artists representing a broader segment of the community and now have a more flexible framework that can be used and reused at any time.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

The mission of the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina. We envision a South Carolina where the arts are valued and all people benefit from a variety of creative experiences. A state agency created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas: arts education, community arts development, and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the SCAC is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. Visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696, and follow @scartscomm on social media.

Jason Rapp

Looking for an arts ed job?

Help out Engaging Creative Minds remotely

Apply soon! Target start date: Monday, February 15, 2021
Ed. note: The Hub would love to help someone start the new year with a new gig. Frequent SCAC partner in the Lowcountry Engaging Creative Minds is looking for a full-time administrative assistant who can—get this—work remotely during and after the pandemic. Posting below is provided by Engaging Creative Minds and does not in any way suggest involvement with or by the South Carolina Arts Commission, which is simply sharing information. It is edited for style.
Engaging Creative Minds (ECM) seeks an administrative assistant with a creative background to successfully support programs and operations. This is a salaried, full-time remote position. Only those with the qualifications listed below should apply. NOTE: This position will continue remotely even after the pandemic. Duties and responsibilities are for primary support of ECM’s systems & operations coordinator for all virtual and in-person program delivery:
  • Communicating with ECM instructors, teachers, seasonal staff and coaches
  • Comparing and reporting pricing for program supplies and materials
  • Managing volunteers, as needed, to assemble program kits & work at Charleston Marathon
  • Scheduling & organizing meetings for coaches, staff and board, when necessary
  • Packing and delivering program materials and supplies
  • Scheduling , filming (on ECM iPhone) & uploading to Vimeo ECM's virtual programs
  • Entering invoices bi-weekly into bill.com
  • Various other office assistance, as necessary
Qualifications of the Ideal Candidate Include:
  • Knowledge and experience working in Vimeo, Excel, Word, Google Drive, Google Docs, Google Sheets, and Zoom
  • Knowledge and experience working in bill.com
  • Excellent communication skills (perfectionist in grammar and spelling a plus)
  • Excellent organizational skills
  • Experience with social media not required, but a plus
  • Ability to shop for best pricing on program materials and organize multiple orders
  • Must be a self-directed, self-motivated go-getter who can take the initiative to get things DONE!
  • A passion for serving youth through the arts is a plus.
  • Ability to work in-person when necessary to film scheduled ECM instructor programs during virtual learning
If you have these qualifications and want to work with a dynamic team of passionate arts educators and creative minds, please submit résumé and letter of interest telling us why you are the ideal candidate for this position to ECM Executive Director Robin Berlinsky:
  • email your information to robin@engagingcreativeminds.org
  • OR mail to:
    • Robin Berlinsky Executive Director Engaging Creative Minds PO Box 31875 Charleston, SC 29417
Target Start Date: Monday, February 15, 2021 ECM is an equal opportunity employer. Mission and purpose Engaging Creative Minds (ECM) mission is to spark creativity and curiosity in all learners through innovative learning experiences. ECM is an Arts Integration educational nonprofit based in Charleston. We work with school districts, principals, teachers and the local workforce to identify specific knowledge and skill sets all students should master before graduating high school. We hire and train local artists, STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) professionals and cultural organizations, called ECM Instructors, to work with grade level teams of teachers to support learning through the Arts. Our goal is for every student to achieve academically, stay engaged in school and succeed in life while their teachers develop engaging Arts Integration teaching strategies that foster collaboration, critical thinking, communication & creativity. Both teachers and students report that ECM is a powerful model of success.  

Submitted material

Fine craft entries sought for statewide competition and exhibition

19th annual S.C. Palmetto Hands Juried Fine Craft Competition and Exhibition

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Monday, March 15, 2021

Fine craft artists from across the state are invited to participate in the 19th annual South Carolina Palmetto Hands Juried Fine Craft Competition and Exhibition.

[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="150"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] As the state’s longest-running fine craft competition and exhibition, objects selected for the show may compete for cash prizes totaling up to $6,500. The exhibition is presented as a component of the annual North Charleston Arts Fest, to be held April 28-May 2, 2021. A $15 entry fee applies. Artists may submit up to four entries. The application is strictly available online and may be accessed via the link at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply. Deadline for entries is Monday, March 15, 2021. Artists in need of assistance with the application process may contact the Cultural Arts Department to schedule a one-on-one meeting, which can be conducted over the phone or in person. Organized and presented by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, this unique exhibition offers fine craft artists from across South Carolina the opportunity to exhibit their inspiring objects in the media of clay, fiber, glass, metal, wood, and three-dimensional mixed media. Thousands have enjoyed the refined talents of South Carolina fine craft artists during past annual exhibitions. Following the close of the show, up to 20 works will be selected to tour the state through the South Carolina State Museum’s 2021/2022 Traveling Exhibitions Program. Sites across South Carolina may request the exhibit to tour in their facilities, thus providing additional exposure for the selected artists. Because the the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the cancellation of the 2020 competition and exhibition, Karen Watson returns to serve as the juror for 2021. Watson has been executive director of the Sumter County Gallery of Art in Sumter since 2005. Before assuming the directorship, her professional background was in biomedical research. Watson’s path from biomedical research to gallery director is not as unlikely as it seems on the surface; she and her former husband were serious collectors of contemporary art. They had the opportunity to meet and befriend many artists and arts professionals within the state and beyond. Watson has a passion for the visual arts and the Sumter County Gallery of Art. She is committed to presenting challenging contemporary and traditional art exhibitions by culturally diverse artists and providing art education opportunities to all the citizens of Sumter County—an extensively rural, economically depressed region of the state isolated from the major art centers of the U.S. Watson served as the juror for the 2009 Waccamaw Arts and Crafts Juried Exhibition at Burroughs-Chapin Art Museum (Myrtle Beach), was a juror for the inaugural CCA 701 Prize in 2012 at 701 Center For Contemporary Art (Columbia), and has been a judge for several local art competitions throughout the years. The 19th Annual South Carolina Palmetto Hands Juried Fine Craft Competition & Exhibition will be on display April 28-May 2, 2021, at the Charleston Area Convention Center (5001 Coliseum Dr., North Charleston). A free public reception and announcement of awards will be held at the Convention Center on Wednesday, April 28, 2021, from 6-8:30 p.m. For more information about the North Charleston Arts Fest, Palmetto Hands, or other exhibition opportunities, contact the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843.740.5854, email culturalarts@northcharleston.org, or visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com.

Submitted material

Entries sought for 15th annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition

Submission deadline: Thursday, February 25, 2021


Sculpture artists from across the nation are invited to participate in the 15th annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition, which opens in conjunction with the 2021 North Charleston Arts Fest.

[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="251"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] Up to 14 sculptures will be juried into the exhibit and compete for cash prizes totaling up to $19,750. A $1,250 honorarium is given to all artists accepted into the show to assist with transportation, installation, de-installation, and incidental expenses. Once all pieces are installed, the juror will award Best in Show ($1000), Outstanding Merit ($500), and up to three Honorable Mentions ($250 each). The application is strictly available online and may be accessed via NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply. An application fee of $35 allows artists to submit up to four entries for consideration. Deadline for submissions is Thursday, February 25, 2021. Artists in need of assistance with any part of the application process may contact the Cultural Arts Department to schedule a one-on-one meeting, which can be conducted over the phone or in person. Organized and presented by the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, this 11-month exhibition offers established and emerging artists the opportunity to display their thought provoking, extraordinary sculptures throughout the picturesque North Charleston Riverfront Park. Set on the banks of the Cooper River, Riverfront Park features ten acres of walking paths, a boardwalk and fountain, an expansive lawn with performance pavilion, children's play areas, and picnic sites. An estimated 50,000 people visit this public park annually to enjoy the amenities located in the heart of the city’s arts community. Due to the cancellation of the 2020/2021 competition and exhibition as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, Daniel T. Beck has been invited back to serve as the juror for 2021/2022. Beck was first exposed to public sculpture as a child through his family's business, Tatti Conservation. He has worked with his family since 1990 on conservation projects such as the collection at Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, NY. In 2018, Daniel was a juror for the Rosen Outdoor Sculpture competition in Boone, NC. Daniel is currently the Iron Studio Coordinator at the Penland School of Craft near Asheville, NC, where he has worked since 2011, facilitating blacksmithing, fabrication, foundry, and sculpture workshops. He maintains a studio practice at his shop in Spruce Pine, NC, and is about to start his third year teaching incarcerated artists through the AMCI/Penland Prison Arts Partnership.
The 15th Annual National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition will be on display April 28, 2021, through March 20, 2022, at North Charleston Riverfront Park, located at 1001 Everglades Ave. in North Charleston. A free public reception and announcement of awards will be held at the Charleston Area Convention Center on Wednesday, April 28, 2021, from 6-8 p.m. For more information about the North Charleston Arts Fest, the National Outdoor Sculpture Competition & Exhibition, or other exhibition opportunities, contact the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843.740.5854, email culturalarts@northcharleston.org, or visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com.

Submitted material

College of Charleston’s Valerie Morris announces retirement

Long-time, accomplished arts dean exiting the stage


For 22 years Valerie Morris, dean of the College of Charleston School of the Arts, has sat in the audience at music and dance performances, theater productions and art lectures and presentations.

She has served as a member of various boards and joined committees to raise funds. A perennial champion of the arts, Morris has always been there, standing off stage, determinedly cheering. And it’s an essential role in a city where the arts often take center stage. “I have known Dean Morris for years as a fellow Rotarian and through her leadership in Charleston’s thriving arts community,” says Charleston Mayor John T. Tecklenburg. “Simply put, she’s been amazing in her impact on the arts scene here in Charleston, along with her personal joie de vivre!”
Morris’s “joie de vivre” or enthusiasm for the arts began at a young age. Growing up in Beverly, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston, she first became interested in the arts at the age of six after an aunt took her to see the movie Hans Christian Anderson starring Danny Kaye. Then she became very active in the local children’s theater and “used every excuse to spend backstage” at the North Shore Music Theatre, the largest operating regional theater in New England. “I guess from the age of 6, I always felt pushed towards the arts,” Morris said, noting that in high school her focus shifted to public speaking and promoting the arts, which won her an award for marketing her high school’s productions. “First, I wanted to perform, then I realized I wanted to be around artists of all types, and to help them achieve their goals.” And that first meant achieving her goals. Morris received her bachelor’s degree in speech arts from American University and a master in speech with a theatre administration emphasis from the University of Michigan. Her career in the arts really picked up when she joined the faculty of American University’s Department of Performing Arts, where she became the founding director of that institution’s Arts Management program. According to Karen Chandler, associate professor of arts management at the College, Morris forged a path for women in the field. “When I entered the field in the early ’80s, Valerie was one of a handful of women arts leaders who had founded and very successfully developed a program in arts management (at American University),” says Chandler, who also worked alongside Morris at American University.
Morris came to the College as dean of the School of the Arts in the fall of 1998. Since then, she has helped establish the undergraduate Arts Management Program and the Graduate Certificate in Arts and Cultural Management, as well as the Historic Preservation and Community Planning Program. Under Morris’s leadership, the School of the Arts has grown and flourished, including earning the South Carolina Governor’s Award for the Arts, the state’s highest award in the arts. Other highlights of Morris’ tenure include helping to launch the Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts in January 2010. The $27.2 million dollar, 70,000-square-foot building is a testament to the growth of the school from a small fine arts department into a comprehensive arts school with seven academic departments and programs. Morris also expanded the School of the Arts Council and, in 2003, established the Friends of the School of the Arts, a membership program that funds scholarships, student travel for competitions and productions, visiting artists, faculty research and development, and international recruitment efforts. And Morris’s hard work has garnered the attention and support of some of CofC’s most esteemed arts alumni, including acclaimed painter Brian Rutenberg (Class of 1987). “To excel as an artist, one needs to be organized, possess a clear-eyed vision and have a great sense of humor. These same qualities apply to leading an entire art school,” says Rutenberg. “Valerie has all of these attributes, plus she is a skillful communicator. Her creation is the world-class reputation that the School of the Arts at the College of Charleston enjoys today. We are all the beneficiaries of her effort.”
As for what comes next, Morris says her future will always include the arts as well as a focus on family. “I’m keeping active on local, regional and national boards,” she says. “Eventually, my husband and I plan to spend considerable time on the West Coast, where my children and grandchildren live.” To honor Morris’s 22 years of service to the College and the School of the Arts, longtime College of Charleston advocates, donors and volunteers Jean and Tap Johnson have established a scholarship in her name. It’s a fitting honor for someone who has done so much for CofC. “Valerie has been a consummate mentor, advisor and colleague over the past 25 years. But more importantly, she is a trusted supporter and dear friend,” says Chandler. “She deserves to do whatever she wants now, feeling satisfied about the outstanding contributions she’s made to the arts infrastructure in so many places – and especially here at CofC.”

Jason Rapp

Charleston arts community loses ‘Big Buddha’

Don Cantwell passes away at 85


The week is closing on a somber note in the Lowcountry.

Don CantwellThe Post & Courier is reporting this morning that Don Cantwell, Charleston Ballet Theatre's longtime artistic director, passed away from complications of cancer. From Maura Hogan:

Acclaimed for raising the bar of dance throughout his native Charleston and beyond, Cantwell for decades served as the visionary, yet strikingly unassuming leader of Charleston Ballet Theatre, working alongside his wife, dancer and dance instructor Patricia Cantwell, and the company’s choreographer Jill Eathorne Bahr.

Known for both his quiet nature and outsize imagination, Cantwell is remembered for cutting a towering, elegant figure. However, even with such stature and presence, the lifelong disciple of dance was said to possess a humility that at times belied the magnitude of his artistry. Those attributes, as well as his twinkling humor, compelled many who knew him to refer to him as “Big Buddha.” 

Read Hogan's full report on the Post & Courier website here. (Subscription might be required.)

Submitted material

2021 North Charleston Arts Fest is a ‘go’

Artists of all disciplines sought to perform or present

Application deadline: Tuesday, December 15, 2020

The City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department is seeking artists in music, theatre, dance, visual art, media art, and literature to participate in the 2021 North Charleston Arts Fest to be held April 28-May 2 at various venues throughout North Charleston.

[caption id="attachment_45731" align="alignright" width="225"] Click to enlarge.[/caption] Regional and local artists and community organizations are welcome to submit an application to perform on stage or present their talents through programs such as exhibitions, lectures, demonstrations, workshops, and more.
  • The application can be accessed at NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com/apply.
  • There is NO fee to apply.
  • Agents submitting applications on behalf of two or more acts should contact the Cultural Arts Department at 843.740.5854 or culturalarts@northcharleston.org for special application instructions.
  • Applications will be accepted through the online submission platform until midnight on Tuesday, December 15, 2020.
  • Artists in need of assistance with any part of the application process may contact the Cultural Arts Department to schedule a one-on-one meeting, which can be conducted over the phone, virtually, or in person.
The Arts Fest review panel will select applicants from all art disciplines to create a mix of free and ticketed events that will work well in the available venues and are geared to meet the interests of a cross-section of ages, cultures, and backgrounds. Proposals for new concepts or programs are encouraged.
The North Charleston Arts Fest is an annual five-day celebration of the arts, offering an array of events and activities such as concerts, theatre presentations, exhibitions and installations, children’s programs, workshops and demonstrations, and more, throughout the City of North Charleston. The festival was cancelled in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, so will once again be presented as the 38th annual event in 2021. All programs and activities will be presented with COVID-19 safety measures in place (face coverings, social distancing, etc.). Because of restrictions on large gatherings, the World Art Expo at Riverfront Park and Children's Festival will not be part of the festival schedule in 2021.
For more information about the North Charleston Arts Fest and other participation opportunities visit NorthCharlestonArtsFest.com or contact the City of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department office at 843.740.5854 or culturalarts@northcharleston.org.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: S.C. arts ed icon passes away

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Remembering Rose Myers

Arts education in South Carolina owes a lot to Rose Myers. We note with sadness yesterday's news of her passing down in the Lowcountry she improved with her vision and drive. Myers was 84 and passed from complications caused by vascular dementia. From the Post & Courier:

Myers spearheaded the creation of both Ashley River Creative Arts Elementary and Charleston County School of the Arts, two schools that have repeatedly earned state and national recognition for their success blending traditional academics with art education.

S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director David Platts reflected on her life and his introduction to her.

“I met her 20 years ago as a young administrator and remember thinking I had just met an arts rock star. She was an amazing, won’t-take-no-for-an-answer educator, and her reach in this state was broad and deep. What a legacy she leaves!”

Read the full story from the Post & Courier here (subscription possibly required).
 

Jason Rapp

Spoleto Festival USA director to retire

30+ years enough for Nigel Redden


Nigel Redden announced that in October 2021 he will step down as general director of Spoleto Festival USA.

“The cancellation of the 2020 Festival and the enforced isolation of the last several months have made me realize that, after nearly 35 years since I first joined Spoleto Festival USA, it is time for me to retire. The Festival continues to mean an enormous amount to me—my first real job was working as a studente assistente at the Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto, Italy, starting in 1969.” Spoleto Festival USA was founded in 1977 as an American counterpart to the annual Festival of Two Worlds in Spoleto Italy. Redden first joined the festival in 1986 as general manager. He resigned in 1991, leaving the organization with assets of approximately $1.5 million, and returned in 1995 after the festival had suffered significant deficits. During his tenure, the festival built endowments; was involved in the renovations of Festival Hall (formerly Memminger Auditorium), Dock Street Theatre, Charleston Gaillard Center, and College of Charleston’s Sottile Theatre; commissioned numerous artists; and staged many world and U.S. premieres. Contemporary composers whose operas were given American or world premieres include Guo Wenjing, Huang Ruo, Philip Glass, Wolfgang Rihm, Kaija Saariaho, Toshio Hosakawa, Pascal Dusapin, Luca Francesconi, Helmut Lachenmann, and Michael Nyman. Bill Medich, chairman of the Spoleto Festival USA board, thanked Redden for his long years of service to the organization. “Nigel Redden has been an inspirational leader for the Festival,” Medich said. “Under his leadership, Spoleto has become known as America’s premier performing arts festival, fulfilling its mission each year to present the best possible program while contributing to the development of young artists and proving a commitment to all forms of the performing arts.” Redden’s notice provides the festival more than a year to identify a successor, and the festival will begin a search immediately.

Jason Rapp

Hub E-vents: May 22 (on May 21)

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

Here are some virtual arts events a day early for you planners

We see you. Sometimes we do events on the same day, sometimes we promo upcoming ones. Sometimes we do both. There are no rules in quarantine life! (Help yourself by reading all of them.)

Charleston Rhizome Collective/ConNECKtedTOO | 2 p.m.

How about some fun with the young arts lovers in the family?
Houses? Dolls? Now it's time for Recycle Cars, another family art lesson for children and families Friday, May 22 at 2 PM Eastern. These cars are made from household materials to limit trips to the store and waste! This image lists materials needed, but you can find them at the details link below. Go here for details and to join this event.

The Gibbes Museum of Art: Song and Spoken Word | 7 p.m.

Ann Caldwell performs "EXODUS: Bound for Freedom"
Ann Caldwell is a singer, song writer and story teller. She has the quiet energy of a windmill yet the soulful voice and power of a locomotive. Ann's rich, organic sound wraps around a note, then takes it and the listener to a different space in time. Caldwell brings a unique rhythm to every beat and word. A native of Denmark, S.C., and long-time resident of Charleston, Ann Caldwell brings with her the spirit of her ancestors who used music as a way to commune with each other and God. Originally scheduled to perform a garden concert at the Gibbes on May 6, she has created a new virtual performance entitled EXODUS: Bound for Freedom, and uses objects from the Gibbes collection to illustrate her stories and songs. View it tomorrow, Friday, May 22, at 7 p.m. on the Gibbes Museum's Facebook page (you do not need a Facebook account to watch).
Artist Statement: The dictionary defines Exodus as a mass departure of people [from one place to another], and my performance tells of the early journeys of the African American people. I chose to focus on the initial EXODUS that occurred when over 12.5 million Africans were captured transported to the New World for the purpose of slave labor--a journey called The Middle Passage. The journey from slavery to freedom (the Underground Railroad) was a second EXODUS, when enslaved Africans and African Americans risked life and limb to escape from the life of bondage and hard labor to go to a place where they could be free. These stories and songs illustrate the determination of my ancestors not to live their lives as enslaved people. No matter how difficult or perilous the journey, they would be forever Bound for Freedom.

Your event not here? Here's a little more on how Hub E-vents works.