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Jason Rapp

Call for exhibition proposals in North Charleston

Park Circle Gallery wants to show your art

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Established and emerging professional visual artists are invited to apply individually or with a group to exhibit at the Park Circle Gallery.

The gallery aims to showcase artwork by regional and local artists in a variety of subjects and media. The city of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department manages the exhibitions in the space, which are rotated on a monthly basis and may feature two or more artists concurrently. Exhibits are programmed one year in advance according to fiscal year. A Review Panel will convene in December 2021 to evaluate and select exhibits for July 2022-June 2023. There is no fee to apply. Artists must apply online at http://northcharlestonculturalartsdepartment.slideroom.com by Tuesday, November 30, 2021, in order for their exhibition proposal to be considered. Park Circle Gallery (PCG), formerly known as the Olde Village Community Building, is North Charleston’s only art gallery. It is located at 4820 Jenkins Avenue in the bustling Park Circle neighborhood, adjacent to several restaurants, bars, breweries, and shops. Exhibits are open to the public Wednesday-Saturday and admission is free. Some details:
  • Applicants must be at least 18 years old.
  • Only original, two-dimensional or three-dimensional pieces will be considered.
  • Submission requirements include an artist statement, resume and exhibition history, exhibition concept, and five quality digital images that portray the quality and style of the artists’ work.
For additional information about PCG and other exhibition opportunities or to learn more about programs and services offered by the city of North Charleston Cultural Arts Department, visit the Arts & Culture section of the city’s website at northcharleston.org, email culturalarts@northcharleston.org, or call 843.740.5854.

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College of Charleston readies for Simons Center renovation

Multimillion-dollar update begins this month

[caption id="attachment_47756" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Click image to enlarge. Provided rendering.[/caption]

The Albert Simons Center for the Arts will be closed for the next two years while the 42-year-old building undergoes an extensive multimillion-dollar renovation.

“This has been a long time coming and we’re delighted,” School of the Arts Dean Edward Hart said. “We are so appreciative of the college’s administration for supporting us. You know, when times are tough, very often the arts take it on the chin. And our administration has shown the foresight to really stand by us with this project, which indicates that the arts really are a priority for the college.” Completed in 1979, the Simons Center, located on St. Philip Street in the heart of the College of Charleston campus, was constructed to serve no more than 800 students. Today the facility serves more than five times that number—and, says Hart, as the hub of the School of the Arts, it’s time to update the classrooms and performance spaces as well as the building’s technology and infrastructure. “The Simons Center has been great, but after 40 years, it needs a little work,” he said. “Better facilities make for a better environment. Everybody wants to be in a place where it looks and feels nice, and where there’s appropriate space.” The project includes renovation of almost 87,400 square feet. Around 10,900 square feet will be demolished, and 22,871 square feet of new building space will be constructed, said Brad Weiland, senior project manager for CofC’s Facilities Management. When the renovation is complete, the updated Simons Center will feature just over 99,000 square feet of classroom and performance space. Upgrades will include:
  • New seminar classrooms, as well as updated and enlarged classroom spaces
  • A new two-story black box theater
  • A state-of-the-art costume shop, scene shop and theater design studio
  • All new sculpture, printmaking and drawing studios
  • A digital lab and gallery/multipurpose room
  • New music practice rooms and revamped dressing room spaces
  • New mechanical, electrical and plumbing systems and updated technological systems
Crews spent the summer moving everything out of the center in preparation of construction, which is to begin in late September. “It was really a logistical jigsaw puzzle trying to figure out where everything was going to go,” Hart said, noting that moving pianos, studio art equipment along with typical classroom furniture was a lengthy process with some items being sent to other locations on campus and others now in storage. Five locations around campus will house School of the Arts programs and departments during the renovation:
  • Harbor Walk West will host offices, classrooms and event spaces for the Department of Art and Architectural History as well as the Arts Management Program. Some music classes will also take place at this location.
  • 136 St. Philip Street (the former site of Redux Contemporary Art Studio) will house the theater and dance scene shop and the Department of Studio Art’s sculpture studio.
  • The third floor of the Lightsey Center will serve as the Department of Studio Art’s offices and printmaking studio as well as drawing studios, which were already housed there.
  • Calhoun Annex (172 Calhoun St./Chapel Theatre) will house the Department of Theatre and Dance design studio.
  • The Department of Theatre and Dance’s costume shop and classroom/meeting facilities will span three floors of the historic building at 329 King St. (corner of King and George streets).
With the Recital Hall and the Emmett Robinson Theatre, located within the Simons Center, closed for the duration of the renovation, many School of the Arts performances will be held in the college’s Sottile Theatre as well as the Chapel Theatre. The renovation will begin with the demolition of the back portion of the building where the new sculpture studio and scene shops will be located. Weiland says demolition of the section of the building near the Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts along St. Philip Street will also begin this fall to make way for the new black box theater. The courtyard on St. Philip Street will also see demolition before the end of the year in preparation for a new front entrance and courtyard. “Construction will run through 2022, and major completion of the building will take place in the spring of 2023 through the summer of 2023. The project is tentatively scheduled to be fully completed and turned over to the College in time for an estimated opening for the fall 2023 semester,” Weiland said. Designed by Liollio Architecture and HGA Design Firm, the reimagined Simons Center will have a bright and colorful ambiance that is inviting to students and visitors. Hart says the colors featured throughout the building are inspired by iconic architectural features found on campus such as the blue-green door of Towell Library and the rich coral color of Randolph Hall. With large windows, a modern façade and carefully chosen brick, Hart says the entrance is meant to subtly grab visitors’ attention as they make their way from the rear of Randolph Hall to St. Philip Street. “It will look brighter, and I think it will be more noticeable from the street.” And the new building will give the School of the Arts the opportunity to visually claim its prominence in the city of Charleston’s vibrant arts scene in lock-step with the school’s new tagline branding itself “The Artistic Heartbeat of Charleston.” “There really isn’t an artistic institution in this town that we aren’t somehow involved with, whether it’s a direct relationship or partnership or whether it’s our graduates that are over there or our faculty members,” Hart said, ticking off the School of the Arts’ connections to Spoleto Festival USA, Piccolo Spoleto, the Charleston Symphony, the Charleston Gaillard Center, the Preservation Society of Charleston as well as area theater and dance companies and art galleries. “We can just go on and on, and I think it’s time for us to claim that. Charleston is an arts city and we’re at the heart of it.”

Jason Rapp

Apply to be a Gibbes Museum visiting artist

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Wednesday, September 15, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. [caption id="attachment_47503" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Marina Savashynskaya Dunbar, Gibbes Museum Visiting Artist in 2021[/caption]


Complementing the Gibbes Museum's exhibition program, its Visiting Artist Series promotes creativity, introduces new art forms, provides perspective on larger community issues, encourages freedom of thought, and connects with the broadest possible audience.

[caption id="attachment_47504" align="alignright" width="250"] Alexandria Dickerson, Gibbes Museum Visiting Artist in 2021[/caption] The program features eight contemporary artists annually, whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Invitations are extended to emerging and nationally-recognized artists whose work aligns with the museum’s collection profile; whose work is in the collection; or who have been identified as a finalist or winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Fletcher Williams III, recent finalist for the South Arts Southern Prize as Hub readers know, was a 2019 visiting artist.

Starting Sunday, artists who currently reside in the South Carolina Lowcountry can apply for a six-week visiting artist session with a proposal introducing their current studio practice, artwork content, and the type of project they would like to pursue through a residency at the Gibbes Museum of Art.

  • Visiting artists receive a weekly honorarium of $250 plus a one-time materials stipend in the amount of $150.
  • Participating artists commit to 10 public studio hours per week during museum hours (usually divided across three days).
  • Following the residency, selected visiting artists now have the opportunity to exhibit works in the Ruth and Bill Baker Art Sales Gallery as well as collaborate on exclusive products to be sold in the Museum Store.
  • The application deadline is Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021 at 11:59 p.m.
Visiting artists are also encouraged to lead adult workshops and participate in virtual programs. For general questions, please contact Director of Contemporary Initiatives and Public Engagement Erin Glaze at eglaze@gibbesmuseum.org. For technical help while submitting your application, please contact SlideRoom at support@slideroom.com.

Jason Rapp

Spoleto Festival USA announces new general director

Beginning October 2021, Mena Mark Hanna will become the Festival’s new leader, taking over from current General Director Nigel Redden, who will be retiring after 35 years.

Hanna (right) comes to Spoleto from Berlin’s Barenboim-Said Akademie, where he was Founding Dean. Prior to his tenure in Berlin, he was Assistant Artistic Director at the Houston Grand Opera. “Mena possesses a depth of knowledge and experience across artistic genres, and also—essential for Spoleto and Charleston—understands and is passionate about the power of artistic expression to bridge differences and bring people together,” said Alicia Gregory, President of the Board of Spoleto Festival USA. “The board is unanimous in Mena’s appointment.”

Jason Rapp

Announcing the FY22 SCAC Fellows

for immediate release


Four South Carolina artists exhibiting hard work and exceptional ability in visual art, craft, and media production and screenwriting are recipients of fiscal year 2022 South Carolina Arts Commission fellowships.

The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) Board of Directors approved four $5,000 fellowships among several other FY22 grant awards to be announced on a later date. The SCAC’s four fellows are:
  • Kristi Ryba of Charleston County in visual art,
  • Clay Burnette of Richland County for craft,
  • Sherard “Shekeese” Duvall of Richland County for media production,
  • and Triza Cox of Florence County for media screenwriting.
Individual artists residing in South Carolina full-time were invited to apply last fall for a fellowship in any of the four categories represented in this cycle. Out-of-state panelists were recruited from each of those disciplines to review applications. Starting with this cycle and going forward, applications are no longer anonymous and awards no longer made solely on artistic merit. The panelists also considered achievements and commitment to the discipline in which artists apply, which can be more than one if separate applications are submitted. Panelists then recommend recipients of each $5,000 fellowship. “Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of exceptional South Carolina individual artists. Recognition from a fellowship lends artistic prestige and can often open doors to other resources and employment opportunities,” SCAC Executive Director David Platts said. “We will no doubt hear more from these amazing artists, and we congratulate them on this honor.”

About the FY22 Individual Artist Fellowship Recipients

Kristi Ryba | Visual Arts | Charleston County Winner of the 2020 South Arts State Fellowship for South Carolina and a 2018 ArtFields second place award, Ryba’s work has been touring the Southeast in painting and printmaking exhibitions since 1990.  A Magna cum laude graduate of the College of Charleston, Ryba also studied at Vermont Studio School and Studio Camnitzer in Valdotavvo, Lucca, Italy, and has her Master of Fine Arts from Union Institute and University, Vermont College. She has won various awards and scholarships. A founding organizer of Print Studio South, Inc., she served as its president and on its board and has taught locally in both adult and children's programs. Ryba was one of 10 artists featured in a 2002 Piccolo Spoleto exhibit and was invited to exhibit in Contemporary Charleston 2004 and in Helping Hands: an artist's debut among friends in 2005. Her work was featured in the 2018 Biennial in Columbia. Ryba also exhibited at Silo in New York City and her work was in the 2007 SOHO20 Chelsea show honoring The Feminist ART Project. Clay Burnette | Craft | Richland County Clay Burnette is a self-taught pine needle basketmaker who has been coiling longleaf pine needles with waxed linen thread since 1977. Burnette’s work is included in numerous public and private collections—including the State Art Collection—and has been included in more than 250 exhibition venues throughout the U.S. and abroad for 40-plus years. He has also been published in numerous international, national, and regional magazines, catalogs, and fine craft publications. Burnette has taught at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts in Gatlinburg, Tennessee since 2015. Images of his work are available at www.clayburnette.com. Sherard Duvall | Media: Production | Richland County Sherard “Shekeese” Duvall is a film and messaging professional from Columbia, S.C. He specializes in visual storytelling, film education, media strategy, diversity consulting and is an advocate of Hip-Hop culture. He’s produced commercial and documentary projects for VH1, Oxygen, and more. A 2021 Liberty Fellow, a 2016 Riley Fellow, a Leo Twiggs Arts Leadership Scholar and one of the founders of Columbia’s Hip-Hop Family Day: Love Peace & Hip-Hop. A 2001 University of South Carolina grad, Sherard is a product of Richland District One schools. Sherard is the Founder and Executive Producer at OTR Media Group, and the proud dad of his son, Cairo. Triza Cox | Media: Screenwriting | Florence County Triza Cox is a playwright, screenwriter, and theatre artist. She is currently the South Carolina Ambassador for the Dramatists Guild and is an associate member of the Society of Stage Directors and Choreographers. Her research and creative work center on playmaking using Jungian archetypes, motifs, and symbols of the collective unconscious. Triza holds an MFA in Theatre Performance from the University of Louisville and has trained with Dell’Arte International School of Physical Theatre and the Mandala Center for Change as a Theatre of the Oppressed Facilitator. Her original plays include A Last Supper; The Willing, which recently received a staged reading with Triad Stage in Greensboro, North Carolina; God in the Midst of it All; and Lil’ Bard which was a semi-finalist in NYU’s New Plays for Young Audience 2018 and premiered at Charlotte’s Children Theatre in a staged reading. Triza has received a Kentucky New Voices grant for her playwriting.
A diverse group of panelists reviewed applications from the discipline in which they work. The visual art and craft panelists were Kesha Bruce, a curator and artist programs manager for the Arizona Commission on the Arts; arts consultant and curator Mark Leach based in St. Louis; and Holly Blake, residency manager for Headlands Center for the Arts in Sausalito, California. Reviewing media production applications were panelists Eleanor Savage, activist and program director with the St. Paul, Minnesota-based Jerome Foundation; and Bill Gaskins, (re)director of the Maryland Institute College of Art’s photographic and electronic media graduate program. Writer and producer April Turner of Charlotte was the media screenwriting panelist.
Four fellowships per year are awarded to artists working in rotating disciplines. One artist from each of these fields: prose, poetry, and theatre acting and playwriting will be honored in fiscal year 2023. To be eligible, artists must be at least 18 years old and a legal U.S. resident with permanent residence in the state for two years prior to the application date and throughout the fellowship period. Applications will be accepted later this summer following announcement by the SCAC. For more on discipline rotation, eligibility requirements, and the application process, please visit https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/grant/fel/.
About the South Carolina Arts Commission The mission of the South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) is to promote equitable access to the arts and support the cultivation of creativity in South Carolina. We envision a South Carolina where the arts are valued and all people benefit from a variety of creative experiences. A state agency created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the SCAC works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas: arts education, community arts development, and artist development. Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the SCAC is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts, and other sources. Visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696, and follow @scartscomm on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Jason Rapp

North Charleston hiring visual arts coordinator

'Hands-on job' installing and curating exhibitions

APPLICATION DEADLINE: Until filled

The city of North Charleston is looking for someone to fill a pending vacancy as its visual arts coordinator.

In the general statement about the position, it's noted that "under occasional supervision, assists in planning, coordinating, promoting, and supervising programs, activities, and events of the cultural arts department. Performs related administrative and supervisory work as required. Reports to the director of cultural arts." A bachelor's degree in the cultural arts, arts administration, public or business administration, public relations, marketing or other relevant field is required, to be supplemented by 2-3 years of experience in arts programming and administration or an equivalent combination of education, training and experience that provides the required knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  1. The posting is listed at this link.
  2. The full job description is here.
  3. The link to apply is here.

Jason Rapp

Charleston art call for wall-mounted, outdoor sculpture

Help brighten up new retirement community

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Monday, July 19, 2021
Art Expressions invites artists to submit work for consideration for a retirement community located in the Charleston area that offers independent living, assisted living, skilled/nursing care, and memory care. Please review the guidelines and submission instructions below. The following types of artwork will be considered:

Media

  • Wall-mounted sculpture (ceramic, acrylic, wood, metal, glass) - cannot project off wall more than 4”
  • Outdoor sculpture – freestanding something that is suitable for a courtyard.

Subject Matter

  • Reflective of the local vernacular including the low country, coastal, and marsh environments
  • Avoid cliché/touristy beach themed pieces
  • Nature-based abstraction
  • Non-figurative and figurative will be considered
  • Conveys positivity
  • Joyful & uplifting
  • Community oriented
  • Avoid red and black in concentrated amounts

Submission Requirements

  • Artists must include their current location or hometown. This is a local sculptural open call for indoor and outdoor artworks. We are seeking artists within the states of South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
  • Artist must be able to ship or deliver the artwork. We will discuss logistics once we have selected the art with our client.
  • All art will be reviewed by Art Expressions for project suitability, and we reserve the right to accept or reject any submission at our discretion.
  • Please include a brief written description for each piece submitted.
  • If an artist does not currently have a piece that fits the size of these locations, they can provide examples of their work and state that they are available for commission requests.
  • Project install for indoor sculpture estimated for December 2021, outdoor sculpture estimated for an early spring 2022 install.

How to Submit

Please visit https://artist.callforentry.org/festivals_unique_info.php?ID=7856 to apply

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Want to be a Gibbes Museum visiting artist?

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: Monday, May 31, 2021 at 11:59 p.m. [caption id="attachment_47088" align="aligncenter" width="600"] Past Visiting Artist Tim Hussey paints on unstretched canvas during his residency, Spring 2019.[/caption] Complementing our exhibition program, the Visiting Artist series promotes creativity, introduces new art forms, provides perspective on larger community issues, encourages freedom of thought, and connects with the broadest possible audience. The program features eight contemporary artists annually, whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Invitations are extended to emerging and nationally recognized artists whose work aligns with the museum’s Collection Profile; whose work is in the Collection; or who have been identified as a finalist or winner of the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Artists who currently reside in South Carolina can apply for a 4-6 week Visiting Artist session with a proposal introducing their current studio practice, artwork content, and type of project they would like to accomplish through a residency at the Gibbes Museum of Art. For general questions, please contact Director of Contemporary Initiatives and Public Engagement Erin Nathanson at enathanson@gibbesmuseum.org. For technical help while submitting your application please contact SlideRoom at support@slideroom.com.

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Halsey Institute is hiring a development coordinator

  APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, June 11, 2021


Join a fast-growing contemporary art organization and help us secure the support needed to bring innovative and adventurous programming to the community!

The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art at the College of Charleston is searching for a development coordinator to help with our mission-centric fundraising efforts and be the main point of contact for our awesome members. This entry-level, full-time position works with our senior staff on the long-term strategic success and growth of our membership program and other funding initiatives like grants and our Community Partners program. Apply online and learn more about the position at https://jobs.cofc.edu/postings/10642.

Jason Rapp

New CEO named by Charleston Gaillard Center

Lissa Frenkel to start in July

[caption id="attachment_46857" align="aligncenter" width="601"] Charleston Gaillard Center[/caption]

Charleston Gaillard Center, a world-class performance hall featuring pre-eminent performers across artistic genres and arts-enhanced education programs throughout the Charleston community, announced Lissa Frenkel as its new chief executive officer. She will begin her new role in July 2021.

Most recently, Frenkel served as managing director of the Park Avenue Armory, a premier cultural institution producing and commissioning unconventional works in the performing and visual arts in Manhattan. During her tenure with the Armory, she was instrumental in building its operating budget from $6 million to $27 million and in leading the $165 million in capital redevelopment projects that invested in the adaptive reuse and restoration of the building. “I look forward to building on the Gaillard Center’s successes and leading the Charleston Gaillard Center team to expand the institution’s identity as a world-class innovator in the performing arts in the region. I am thrilled to be joining such a culturally adventurous community in Charleston and at the prospect of partnering with both the Gaillard’s resident companies and collaborators and the broader Charleston community as a conduit for artistic expression and conversation in the city. Working closely with the Gaillard Performance Hall Foundation, I am delighted to support Charleston’s long-term commitment to the arts,” said Frenkel. Prior to the Armory, Frenkel worked at the Lincoln Center Development Project, a $500 million cultural redevelopment of the Lincoln Center complex in Manhattan that included the expansion of The Julliard School, Alice Tully Hall and multiple public spaces. Originally from Boston, Frenkel earned her undergraduate degree in art history from Emory University and her master’s degree in urban planning from the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University.
The Charleston Gaillard Center opened in 2015 after a $142 million renovation. With a design echoing the tradition of Europe’s renowned opera houses, the Martha & John M. Rivers Performance Hall features superb acoustics, meticulously integrated in the design, construction and furnishings. With a capacity to seat 1,818, the hall features a 65-musician orchestra pit, nine dressing rooms, six certified sensory- inclusive areas and has programmed Broadway shows, musicians, authors, comedians and performance artists ranging from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, Yo-Yo Ma, Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater and the Charleston Jazz Festival to Keb’ Mo’, Renee Fleming and Tony Bennett. In addition to the Martha & John M. Rivers Performance Hall, The Charleston Gaillard Center features a 13,137-square-foot Grand Ballroom, an expansive 8,587-square-foot terrace lawn and a variety of pre- function spaces, complete with a full-service, on-site catering team. Throughout the years, The Charleston Gaillard Center has hosted many notable cultural, political and corporate events, including the 2016 and 2020 Democratic Party presidential debates, Southeastern Wildlife Exposition, South Carolina International Trade Conference and Benefitfocus’ One Place conference.
The Charleston Gaillard Center is a nonprofit, state-of-the-art performing arts center located in downtown Charleston, S.C. Opened in 2015, the Gaillard’s vision to be a community centerpiece is illustrated through its premier year-round programming and partnership with the Gaillard Performance Hall Foundation to extend educational opportunities throughout the community. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube.