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Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: Student art call + Carter Boucher, Adrian Rhodes news

Good morning! 

"Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...
[caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="150"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption]

ArtFields Jr. is looking for student art

Submission deadline: February 12, 2021 The ArtFields Jr. Art Competition is open to South Carolina students in grades 1 through 12. All artwork submitted is considered by their review panel. Select pieces will be displayed during the month of April and final judging takes place during ArtFields. Schools and families are encouraged to attend the awards ceremony to support their student artists and developing artists throughout the community. Submissions for the 2021 competition are open through February 12, 2021. For complete details of the ArtFields Jr. competition, click here.

2020 is stopping neither Carter Boucher...

(Submitted material) Clarence Carter Boucher, Arts Access South Carolina master teaching artist, is continuing a very successful year. The website/blog https://www.detour-ahead.org/ is featuring three of his paintings and information about his art career, live now here. Plus:
  • "Art from the Heart," a hardback book about art, is going to include his oil portrait, Jesse James, composer.
  • Hip Pocket Press is publishing a piece of his flash fiction, Postcard to a Train Conductor.

... nor Adrian Rhodes

The 2020 SCAC visual arts fellow made a book of recent drawings, currently on view at 701 CCA as part of the 701 Prize Finalists exhibition. She is taking preorders for the book on her website through December 3rd.

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: CAE lands call for art; Carter Boucher, GCCA news

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


CAE: S.C.'s newest arts hotspot taking off?

(Sorry, we couldn't resist. The pilot has illuminated the fasten seat belts sign, because it gets worse.) Columbia Metropolitan Airport (Lexington County) has been active on the arts scene in the past week. Consider:
  • Midlands artists, please pick up the white courtesy phone. Last week CAE announced a call for Midlands artists to exhibit their artwork at the airport's new rotating exhibition. That is cleared for takeoff October 2020 into 2021. A new program, Art in the Airport is also intended to enhance travelers’ experience while “creating a sense of place” within the airport. Upon landing, travelers will see the art "which showcases the life and culture of the Midlands." Artists accepted may sell their work(s), and CAE will not be taking any commissions. That's more than ... fare; it's an upgrade! This link will route you to your final destination for more information from ColaDaily.com.
  • Yesterday, a partnership with Transitions Homeless Shelter continued as 18 works of art by past and present residents of the shelter were displayed. These works, too, are available for purchase. Residents keep their commissions as well. Read more about the new exhibition from (again) ColaDaily.com.


Carter Boucher news

Works by #SCArtists Carter Boucher is being noticed. To wit:
  • Another of his Enigma series paintings accepted in a juried show. This time, his painting "Pandemic Engulfment" (acrylic on canvas) was accepted in the Mid-Atlantic Juried Art Show in Virginia Beach, Virginia.
  • Further, his poem, "A Love Letter To Covid 19," was accepted for publication in Constellations. Boucher has had four creative pieces, three poems and one creative non-fiction piece, accepted so far this year. He also published his book, How to Be an Artist in Residence (And Excel at It!) on Amazon.

GCCA honors founder

[caption id="attachment_45309" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Linda Furman surrounded by family and friends in front of new building signage bearing her name. GCCA photo.[/caption] Greenville Center for Creative Arts has completed a $1 million fundraising campaign to sustain operations and expand its impact—all in the name of a beloved member of the Greenville arts community. GCCA’s historic Cloth Building at 101 Abney St. will now be named the Linda Quinn Furman Building in honor of one of its founders, a dynamic artist and philanthropist. Family and friends surprised her with the announcement yesterday when they stopped by GCCA to view the newly installed signage (above).

Jason Rapp

Tuning Up: Anthology includes Boucher + art museums set reopening dates

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


  • Poet's Choice just announced that "A Perfect Night,” a poem by Clarence Carter Boucher, was selected for inclusion in the anthology A Childbirth Song or Poem. Boucher has been participating in SCAC programs since 1981. His residencies are often interdisciplinary, involving the visual arts, writing and music. Arts Access South Carolina, which provides arts experiences for people with disabilities, named him as a master teaching artist.
  • Two big names on the South Carolina art museum scene announced reopening plans in recent days. Visitors can peruse the collection at the Columbia Museum of Art starting June 16, and the Gibbes Museum of Art (Charleston) announced via email that it will welcome patrons starting June 1. Before going, make sure you're aware of safety precaution policies in place by checking each museum's website:

Summer arts camp experiences for children with special needs

Arts Access SC, Aiken Center for the Arts team up


Special needs children in the CSRA will get to experience art and music this summer thanks to a partnership among Arts Access South Carolina, Aiken Performing Arts, and the Aiken Center for the Arts. 
  • June 10-14, 2019
  • 10 a.m. to noon OR 1-3 p.m.
  • Aiken Center for the Arts
[caption id="attachment_37823" align="alignright" width="150"] AASC master teaching artist Carter Boucher, working with a student from S.C. School for the Deaf and the Blind.[/caption] Designed specifically to enable children living with traumatic brain injuries, cerebral palsy, and other physical and developmental disabilities to express themselves creatively, this program is the highlight of our summer outreach. The camp offers adaptable art and music programs designed to enable campers to express their creativity. Whether they are working with clay, trying out screen printing, or experimenting with tonal and atonal musical instruments, their days will be filled with fun. Carter Boucher, an artist in residence and master arts instructor for the Arts Access South Carolina, will teach this years camp. He told WFXG FOX 54 that he urges parents to sign their children up "even if you don’t think they will participate. We have seen children who are nonverbal singing songs and others who usually don’t participate taking the lead on projects. These camps are fun but they also are helpful to these children.” Eligible campers may attend free. Enrollment is limited, so go here to apply today.

Artist believes disabilities shouldn’t hold one back from creating

From the Aiken Standard Article by Stephanie Turner

Throughout his career, artist and art educator Carter Boucher has worked with various ages with various skill levels and abilities. One demographic that he teaches comprises children, teenagers and adults with disabilities. Since his first class with this demographic, he's taught people in wheelchairs, with autism, with Alzheimer's Disease, without limbs and prone to panic attacks, to name just a handful. Boucher started this specific endeavor in the 1980s. Through certain programs, he would visit schools and noticed that students with special needs were often not invited to program's classes. "I started going to the principals and just saying, 'We ought to include those kids,'" Boucher said. "It was sort of a surprise to them that I wanted to do that. ... I feel like populations like that particularly benefit from doing things. A lot of times they get left out." Based in Anderson County, Boucher has taught students throughout South Carolina and will teach a set of classes in Aiken this summer. When he knows about his class's students, Boucher will prepare so he is best able to accommodate each person's needs. Some of his classes have consisted of students with different disabilities, and he said he tries to tune into what each student needs while the class is in session. "The more you know about who's coming and whatever their situation is then the better you can work with," he said. The art teacher has tools such as scissors for people with hand problems. He has contacted schools to see if the student needs any special equipment and if he can then borrow it. If Boucher sees a condition listed on the roster with which he hasn't encountered or has any questions, he will contact a physician for more information or reach out to someone who has worked with the student to see if there is anything which Boucher needs to be aware. One example of how he has adjusted his approach can be seen in a class of autistic children. "Sometimes, I would slow down the process," he said. "For instance, if we were doing silkscreen pencil stencils, I would let them tear or cut or whatever they want to do to make an image, and it would often draw them out. I got a lot of comments from the teachers who worked with autistic kids how much it seemed to draw them out and get them doing things." He's had a student tell him that his class was the first time they felt like they were really part of a class. "What surprises a lot of people who watch me work with the kids is how much they do on their own," Boucher said. "Whatever it is we do with them and however they accomplish it, ... they feel like they own this artwork. It wasn't something we did. It was something they did." Boucher is an Arts Access SC master artist who creates fine art or illustrations with different mediums and methods such as oil, gouache, etching, wood engraving, silk screen and airbrushing. He will be the instructor of the Aiken Center for the Arts' new creative day camp, I Spy Art & Music Camp. The camp is for ages 5 to 13 with cognitive and physical disabilities such as traumatic brain injury and cerebral palsy. It will run from June 12-16 from 10 a.m. to noon or from 1 to 3 p.m. at the arts center, 122 Laurens St. S.W. The camps are free, but enrollment is limited. "(Art) builds confidence. It lowers anxiety and activates parts of the brain that help with almost every subject," Boucher said. He will have some helpers present and is planning for the students to make paper mache masks, work with screenprinting and make music with simple tonal musical instruments that anyone can use. If the young artist has any specific triggers or needs, it is recommended the parent or guardian include that information. Applications are only accepted online. For more information on the camp or Boucher, visit www.aikencenterforthearts.org or www.boucherart.com or call 803-641-9094.