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Jason Rapp

Hub E-Vents: July 23

You want art. You crave art.

#SCartists and arts organizations want to fill that void. They live for that. It’s a calling. Yet in times of social distancing, that’s hard to do. Through the wonders of modern technology, many are trying and succeeding. So while we’re all staying home to protect vulnerable family, friends, and neighbors,  The Hub is stepping up to fill the void between artists and arts lovers. (Learn more about Hub E-vents here.)

Today

Well, it might not be #SCartists, but it's still a pretty big deal. On Thursday, July 23 at 7 p.m. ET, there will be a virtual celebration of the 30th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act. It’s a free event that will be emceed by Danny Woodburn. You can register at www.ADA30LeadOn.Eventbrite.com or watch via Facebook Live or on YouTube. Join disability rights leaders, performers, artists, singers, dancers, poets, filmmakers and storytellers with disabilities in the celebration. There will also be messages from Mary Anne Carter of the National Endowment for the Arts, Beth Bienvenu, and Charles Baldwin (Mass Cultural Council) highlighting the roles of the SAAs and RAOs and Arts Endowment grantees.

Bonus video content: ADA30 Lead On - Marlee Matlin Promo

More event information and guest appearances:
  • Learn about the five titles of the ADA through the disability lens of entertainment. Join Tony Award winner Ali Stroker (Oklahoma); with performances by Maysoon Zayid (General Hospital); RJ Mitte (Breaking Bad); Alice Sheppard (Kinetic Light) performing her dance “Descent;” Heidi Latsky Dance; Krip-Hop Nation’s Leroy Moore & Keith Jones performing their “My ADA Story;” photos by Tom Olin and more.
  • With messages by Senator Tom Harkin; NCD Chair Neil Romano; Tony Coelho; Judy Heumann; Marlee Matlin; Jim LeBrecht (Crip Camp); CJ Jones (Avatar) and more.

What’s that? Accessibility Grants from the SCAC

'Trustus in the Round' a result of grant


It's a small grant category, but it helps South Carolina organizations do big things in the arts. Notice we didn't say "arts organizations" there. That's because Accessibility Grants are intended help South Carolina organizations make arts programs and existing facilities accessible to persons with disabilities. Non-profit organizations, units of government, and designated S.C. Department of Disabilities & Special Needs boards who provide arts programming can use an Accessibility Grant to get up to $2,500 to improve access to that programming. Sounds nice, and you should definitely read more about these grants, but what does it look like in real life? Well... Trustus Theatre in Columbia wanted its audiences to experience "theater in the round" for three consecutive productions in early 2020. Extensive renovation to the main stage would be required to convert it to a round configuration. But a problem arose: even though it's temporary, the round stage would nonetheless compromise current accessibility enjoyed by Trustus' disabled patrons. The answer was to remove 88 fixed seats to integrate accessible seating into the temporary stage structure which, when complete, would be able to reintegrate some of the removed fixed seating while allowing ramp access to patrons who need it. A $2,500 Accessibility Grant from the S.C. Arts Commission made that happen. And, because partnerships are a key way SCAC accomplishes its work, it's here that we'll note Trustus partnered with ABLE SC to develop a viable solution. The round stage debuts Feb. 7 with the theater's production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

Submitted material

NEA offers summertime learning

Arts-centric learning opportunities abounds

The National Endowment for the Arts, a major funder of the S.C. Arts Commission, is offering an abundance of varied learning opportunities this summer. Read on to learn more!

Citizens’ institute on Rural Design: Call for Applications from Rural and Tribal Communities!

Office hours through Facebook: June 18, 6-7 p.m. ET & July 10, 1-2 p.m. ET The National Endowment for the Arts is pleased to announce that the Request for Applications from communities is open now until July 22! The Citizens’ Institute on Rural Design™ will continue its tradition of offering local design workshops that address specific community challenges, and also create a new cohort learning program that will engage rural leaders from up to 20 additional communities. All rural communities of 50,000 or less are eligible to apply for the CIRD local workshop and learning cohort opportunities. We encourage applications from nonprofits, tribal or municipal governments, regional planning organizations, and other community partners. We hope to hear from a variety of rural communities from a wide range of backgrounds, geographies, and capacities. If you are a rural service provider, please share this opportunity widely with colleagues and community leaders in rural areas who might be interested in applying. The Citizens' Institute on Rural Design™ is a National Endowment for the Arts leadership initiative in partnership with the Housing Assistance Council and buildingcommunityWORKSHOP.

Navigating Your Arts Career: Resources & Financial Tools for People with Disabilities

June 19, 2019 | Register Join the National Endowment for the Arts and Art Beyond Sight on June 19, 2019, from 3-4:15 p.m. ET, for the second in a series of six webinars promoting careers in the arts for people with disabilities. This webinar series is part of a toolkit, designed to help expand employment and career development opportunities for disabled people as artists and cultural workers, which will be launched later this year. This webinar, “Navigating your Arts Career: Resources and Financial Tools for People with Disabilities”, will address some of the barriers people with disabilities find when pursuing a career in the arts. Hear a panel of experts address the burning questions people with disabilities have when seeking careers in the arts, including how to maintain crucial public benefits while working in the arts or how to transition to work. Join experts for an interactive discussion. Host: Andy Arias, actor and Policy Advisor, Office of Disability Employment Policy, U.S. Department of Labor Speakers will include:

Our Town

Deadline: Aug. 8, 2019 New guidelines now online Webinar: June 24, 2019 Our Town is the National Endowment for the Arts’ creative placemaking grants program. These grants support projects that integrate arts, culture, and design activities into efforts that strengthen communities by advancing local economic, physical, and/or social outcomes. Arts Endowment staff will conduct a webinar to share tips on how to ensure an Our Town application is clear and compelling on June 24.

Creating a State Data Culture to Inform Investments in Arts Education

Tuesday, June 25, 2 p.m. EDT | Register Speakers will include:
  • Ayanna N. Hudson, director, Arts Education for the National Endowment for the Arts
  • Claus von Zastrow, Ph.D., principal, Education Commission of the States
Join a webinar to examine a collaboration between the National Endowment for the Arts and Education Commission of the States to build states’ capacity to report on the arts education data they collect. The webinar will focus on the current climate for such work in states, strategies and tools for supporting state-level data efforts, and the value of incorporating arts education data into broader efforts to promote a culture of information in states.

Art Works

Deadline: July 11, 2019 (for projects beginning no earlier than June 1, 2020) Art Works is the National Endowment for the Arts’ principal grants program. Through project-based funding, we support public engagement with, and access to, various forms of excellent art across the nation, the creation of art that meets the highest standards of excellence, learning in the arts at all stages of life, and the integration of the arts into the fabric of community life. Matching grants generally will range from $10,000 to $100,000.

Tuning Up: Art is for everyone, Part Infinity

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


No, really, art is for everyone. Good luck making it through this story (video) from CBS Sunday Morning without a huge smile. Maybe a tissue. (You've been warned.) Bonus content. We are sharing this story because it happened in our state, it is arts-related, and is newsworthy, but we are definitely not commenting. NOPE.    

Submitted material

Catching up with Arts Access South Carolina

Spring residencies, conferences, and more

2019 marks 33 years of ARTS ACCESS South Carolina (AASC) providing vibrant cultural access for artists statewide! 2018 was a year full of wonder and satisfying collaborations between educators, teaching artists and students across the state! We want to start the year as strong as we finished it, providing opportunities for empowerment and enrichment through the arts.
[caption id="attachment_38827" align="aligncenter" width="400"] AASC December 2018 Residency with Master Teaching Artist
Arianne King-Comer at Stall High School in North Charleston.[/caption]
  • AASC is currently accepting requests for spring 2019 residencies. Please contact AASC Executive Director Julia Brown-DuBose by email at jbrown@arts.sc.gov for more information.
  • Are you invested in equitable access to arts learning for students with disabilities? If so, VSA Intersections: Regional Arts & Special Education Conference is for you! VSA Intersections convenes everyone involved in this venture: general and special educators, arts specialists, teaching artists, principals, nonprofit administrators, education program managers, university professors, policy makers, researchers, school administrators, and more. You will find this conference invaluable to your work supporting students with disabilities! There's a national conference this October in California, and a regional conference in New Orleans this March.
  • We are proud to announce that Arts Access South Carolina received a grant from the S.C. Department of Education to serve as fiscal agent for Curriculum Leadership Institute for the Arts (CLIA) in 2019! This is our second year partnering with CLIA and this grant will allow AASC to administer a summer arts institutes to provide professional development in arts content to South Carolina arts teachers, classroom teachers, and arts administrators. We are excited about our continued partnership with CLIA and the opportunities it will provide for teachers and students alike!
For more information about opportunities to support or participate with AASC, visit ArtsAccessSC.org.

Artist believes disabilities shouldn’t hold one back from creating

From the Aiken Standard Article by Stephanie Turner

Throughout his career, artist and art educator Carter Boucher has worked with various ages with various skill levels and abilities. One demographic that he teaches comprises children, teenagers and adults with disabilities. Since his first class with this demographic, he's taught people in wheelchairs, with autism, with Alzheimer's Disease, without limbs and prone to panic attacks, to name just a handful. Boucher started this specific endeavor in the 1980s. Through certain programs, he would visit schools and noticed that students with special needs were often not invited to program's classes. "I started going to the principals and just saying, 'We ought to include those kids,'" Boucher said. "It was sort of a surprise to them that I wanted to do that. ... I feel like populations like that particularly benefit from doing things. A lot of times they get left out." Based in Anderson County, Boucher has taught students throughout South Carolina and will teach a set of classes in Aiken this summer. When he knows about his class's students, Boucher will prepare so he is best able to accommodate each person's needs. Some of his classes have consisted of students with different disabilities, and he said he tries to tune into what each student needs while the class is in session. "The more you know about who's coming and whatever their situation is then the better you can work with," he said. The art teacher has tools such as scissors for people with hand problems. He has contacted schools to see if the student needs any special equipment and if he can then borrow it. If Boucher sees a condition listed on the roster with which he hasn't encountered or has any questions, he will contact a physician for more information or reach out to someone who has worked with the student to see if there is anything which Boucher needs to be aware. One example of how he has adjusted his approach can be seen in a class of autistic children. "Sometimes, I would slow down the process," he said. "For instance, if we were doing silkscreen pencil stencils, I would let them tear or cut or whatever they want to do to make an image, and it would often draw them out. I got a lot of comments from the teachers who worked with autistic kids how much it seemed to draw them out and get them doing things." He's had a student tell him that his class was the first time they felt like they were really part of a class. "What surprises a lot of people who watch me work with the kids is how much they do on their own," Boucher said. "Whatever it is we do with them and however they accomplish it, ... they feel like they own this artwork. It wasn't something we did. It was something they did." Boucher is an Arts Access SC master artist who creates fine art or illustrations with different mediums and methods such as oil, gouache, etching, wood engraving, silk screen and airbrushing. He will be the instructor of the Aiken Center for the Arts' new creative day camp, I Spy Art & Music Camp. The camp is for ages 5 to 13 with cognitive and physical disabilities such as traumatic brain injury and cerebral palsy. It will run from June 12-16 from 10 a.m. to noon or from 1 to 3 p.m. at the arts center, 122 Laurens St. S.W. The camps are free, but enrollment is limited. "(Art) builds confidence. It lowers anxiety and activates parts of the brain that help with almost every subject," Boucher said. He will have some helpers present and is planning for the students to make paper mache masks, work with screenprinting and make music with simple tonal musical instruments that anyone can use. If the young artist has any specific triggers or needs, it is recommended the parent or guardian include that information. Applications are only accepted online. For more information on the camp or Boucher, visit www.aikencenterforthearts.org or www.boucherart.com or call 803-641-9094.

Harbison Theatre offering classes for dancers along the Autism Spectrum

parsonsdanceHarbison Theatre at Midlands Technical College received a South Carolina Arts Commission Accessibility grant to increase sensory-friendly access to dance. The Theatre is partnering with Parsons Dance, The S.C. Autism Society, and Columbia College to offer three dance classes for dancers along the Autism Spectrum. Experienced dance educator Terrance Henderson is leading two of the fun, pressure-free workshops suitable for dancers of any experience - including no experience at all - and the final workshop will be facilitated by dancers from Parsons Dance (pictured right). The next two classes are Oct. 22 and Nov. 16. Participants in one or more of these workshops will be awarded a certificate of participation on stage at the end of the Parsons Dance Relaxed Performance on Nov. 19. Each workshop is only $5 and is open to dancers 7 years and older. Workshops take place in the Godbold Center on the campus of Columbia College. Find out more on Harbison Theatre's website. https://youtu.be/qamoKLha998   Via: Harbison Theatre

Greenwood Community Theatre to open up to children with disabilities

From The Greenwood Index Journal Article by Katie Pearson

[caption id="attachment_27865" align="alignright" width="200"]Penguin Project Two Penguin Project participants. Photo courtesy national Penguin Project website.[/caption] About three months ago during a show, Stephen Gilbert, executive director of the Greenwood Community Theatre, found a model for a show that would feature children with special needs. During intermission, Gilbert mentioned the model to Theo Lane, district manager of government and community relations for Duke Energy and one of the founding members of Project Hope, a center that will be opening in Greenwood in September to provide services to children with autism. He is also the father to a child with autism. "As the parent of a son with autism, and having worked since 1997 to help enhance access for both educational and therapy services through Project Hope Foundation, I was thrilled when Stephen Gilbert approached me with this idea," Lane said. The model is called The Penguin Project and it is designed to give children with special needs an opportunity to participate in theater. Gilbert sent an email to the founder of the project, Dr. Andy Morgan, that same night. Morgan said the program provides an opportunity for increased socialization, improved communication skills, and a boost in self-confidence and assertiveness. Morgan is a developmental pediatrician, as well as an actor and director in Illinois. "I saw from watching my own children how it helped them with communication and socialization," Morgan said about the benefits of theater in general. Partnering that observation with his work for children with special needs, The Penguin Project was born and has spread out to other communities. "It's really skyrocketed," Morgan said. "We've seen the exact same magic in every replication." There are now 18 programs in 11 states, according to Morgan. [caption id="attachment_27864" align="alignright" width="225"]Greenwood Community Theatre From left: Kirk Husser, president of the board at Greenwood Community Theatre; Mark Hyatt, director of marketing and public relations at Self Regional Healthcare; Stephen Gilbert, executive director at Greenwood Community Theatre; Mamie Nicholson, program officer for The Self Family Foundation; Theo Lane, district manager of government and community relations at Duke Energy; and Jimmy Burton, executive director at Burton Center come together to discuss the Penguin Project and the impact it will have on the community. Photo by Katie Pearson[/caption] Greenwood Community Theatre will be the first theater in South Carolina to replicate the program. Self Family Foundation, Self Regional Healthcare, Project Hope, Burton Center and Greenwood County Community Foundation have all agreed to partner with Greenwood Community Theatre to bring the production to life. The Genetic Center and local school districts have agreed to help with the program. Gilbert, along with each of the programs partners, are enthusiastic about the benefits Greenwood will see from the program. The program is designed to work with special needs children ages 10-21. The program stars children with developmental, intellectual an learning disabilities, as well as visual and hearing impairments and neurological disorders. During the first year at the Greenwood Community Theatre, children with physical disabilities might not be able to perform because of a lack of access to the stage, but Gilbert said a stage with handicap access might become available for the program after the first year. Each special needs child in the production is accompanied by a peer mentor of the same age. Mentors will receive a crash course in therapy. According to Morgan, previous productions have shown that not only do great relationships develop between actors and mentors, but the mentors learn that the actors are "just like other kids." Through this project, parents of special needs children get to see their child perform, which is something that might never have been possible before. "Every child deserves access to theater," Gilbert said. "I think it's going to do a lot for the community." Throughout the program, Morgan, along with others who have experience in the program, will monitor information meetings, auditions and rehearsals, as well as attend one of the shows. Information meetings are set to begin in April 2017, auditions will be in May and the show will be in September.

Spoleto to live-stream and rebroadcast “Porgy and Bess”

From The Post and Courier Article by Adam Parker

[caption id="attachment_26340" align="alignright" width="300"]Porgy and Bess cast Soprano Alyson Cambridge, baritone Lester Lynch and stage director David Herskovits listen as festival and city officials announce Spoleto Festival USA’s production of “Porgy and Bess” will be live-streamed and rebroadcast. ADAM PARKER/STAFF[/caption] Tickets for every performance of Spoleto Festival USA’s production of “Porgy and Bess” sold out within about two weeks, leaving many to hope for a miracle. Would the festival schedule additional performances? Were there blocks of reserved seats that might become available? And there was something else, a gnawing issue that many arts organizations must cope with (or choose to avoid): What about all the people who want to see the show but can’t afford the ticket price in the first place? Spoleto Festival, in cooperation with the Charleston Office of Cultural Affairs and Piccolo Spoleto Festival, came up with a solution. It will live-stream the performance of “Porgy and Bess” on a Jumbotron screen in Marion Square at 7:30 p.m. May 30, then rebroadcast the opera at 7:30 p.m. the next night in the practice field of West Ashley High School. The Marion Square simulcast and West Ashley rebroadcast are made possible in part by the sponsorship of Wells Fargo and are open to the public and free. Festival officials are optimistic about the weather but will devise a contingency plan should the forecast include rain. Mayor John Tecklenburg emphasized the importance of “Porgy and Bess” to Charleston, noting that George Gershwin spent the summer of 1934 in the area soaking in Lowcountry culture. Tecklenburg remembered attending the 1970 production of the folk opera at the old Gaillard Municipal Auditorium. It was the first time “Porgy” had been performed in the city that inspired its story and characters. The show was finally presented here, 35 years after its New York premiere, because the Gershwins had prohibited the presentation of the opera in segregated theaters. “Last year, when I ran for mayor, I said that one of our goals should be to improve our citizens’ quality of life by making the arts more accessible to more residents in more areas of our city,” Tecklenburg said in a statement. “Today, thanks to the Spoleto Festival USA and its sponsors, that vision is now starting to become a reality.” The folk opera by George and Ira Gershwin and DuBose Heyward currently is in rehearsals at the Gaillard Center. It stars soprano Alyson Cambridge and baritone Lester Lynch. The new production is directed by David Herskovits. “‘Porgy and Bess’ has become part of this city’s history in ways we want to embrace and celebrate,” Herskovits said. “This is a ‘Porgy and Bess’ for you, for the people of Charleston, for all the people of Charleston.” Spoleto Festival General Director Nigel Redden said the opera “evocatively represents the people of the Lowcountry” and it only made sense to make it accessible to local residents. Though she has been in several other productions of “Porgy,” Cambridge is singing the role of Bess for the first time, she said. “No pressure, right?” she joked, adding that members of the cast were familiar with one another and happy to have this chance to perform in the opera. “It’s been a through-line in my operatic career,” she said. Lynch said it is impossible to ignore the rich history of Charleston, in which the opera is steeped. “To be in the place it was created, it’s an amazing feeling, and an honor really,” he said.
 

Call for art: Kennedy Center competition for emerging young artists with disabilities

The Kennedy Center’s office of VSA & Accessibility, with support from Volkswagen Group of America, announces this year’s Emerging Young Artist program: (Re)Invention: Art + Innovation + Disability + Design, a juried exhibition of emerging young artists with disabilities, ages 16-25, showcasing artwork created at the intersection of technology, innovation, and disability. Fifteen winners share a total of $60,000 in cash prizes, with a 1st prize of $20,000. Winners are flown to Washington, D.C. to attend the exhibit opening on Capitol Hill and take part in a three-day intensive professional development workshop. (Re)Invention will be exhibited at the Kennedy Center as part of a year-long national tour. Application deadline is June 1, 2016. Find out more and apply. Via: Kennedy Center Office of VSA & Accessibility