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Thin Ice: Art professor saves National Park glaciers as woodcut prints, work acquired by national galleries

Todd Anderson, a printmaker and assistant professor of art at Clemson University, received a South Carolina Arts Commission Quarterly Grant for this project. The next deadline is February 15. Image above: Todd Anderson, assistant professor of art and printmaking at Clemson University, displays one of his reductive woodblock prints in “The Last Glacier”, an artist book of 23 image plates of glaciers in Glacier National Park, Montana, by him, Bruce Crownover and Ian van Coller. Image Credit: Ken Scar / Clemson University

From Clemson University Article by Clinton Colmenares CLEMSON — With a heavy mug of coffee in one hand, Todd Anderson moves through his personal studio like a chef moving through a four-star kitchen: fluidly, efficiently, among the tools of his trade: neatly stacked cans of paint sorted by color, saws and drills tucked away without a hint of sawdust, brushes hanging neatly, chisels gleaming. Every label of every can and jar and bottle faces outward, lest confusion disrupt the rhythm of his work. Anderson, an assistant professor of art at Clemson University, is a printmaker, skilled at transferring beauty and wonder from landscapes onto paper to share his experiences with the public. When guests arrive at his studio, which used to be his garage, Anderson slips on a pair of shoes, turns off a stream of classical jazz and begins to tell a story about his latest project, which recently gained national attention.
“I think we all understand that the world is changing in sweeping and dramatic ways,” Anderson says, his voice quiet and earnest. “My belief is that those places need to be seen, they need to be experienced and they need to be creatively documented.” It’s a holy trinity that guides his work. Since its founding 100 years ago, Glacier National Park has lost more than 80 percent of its glaciers. Over the past six years, Anderson says, he hiked more than 500 miles through that park for a project called “The Last Glacier.” He and two collaborators, painter Bruce Crownover and photographer Ian van Coller, recently finished the project, resulting in original artwork that includes 15 specially bound 25- by 38-inch books with Anderson’s original prints, Crownover’s paintings and van Coller’s photos. “My intent as an artist is to share the beauty of a changing world,” Anderson says. In demand The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and the New York Public Library are sharing the work; they each bought a book on the spot. The Library of Congress bought another. Clemson’s Emery A. Gunnin Architecture Library, the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Yale, and several private collectors have also invested in the artistic, historical records. The Last Glacier quickly garnered the kind of attention artists dream of. But Anderson couldn’t look lighter, more carefree. He says he spent a great deal of his life camping, hiking and climbing his way through the Rocky Mountains, sleeping with the stars overhead. It’s easy to picture him on a mountain in a three-day beard and a worn flannel shirt, accidentally hip. On being outside, Anderson says, “If you’ve felt frost on a sleeping bag, or seen dew on cobwebs in the woods, you can understand the value of that experience.” Rock climbing shaped his arms and hands; they’re strong, purposeful. His blue eyes sparkle with an infinite appreciation for wonder, reflecting a scientist’s curiosity and exacting patience. There are stories in those hands and eyes, and a quiet urgency to tell them.
[caption id="attachment_137033" align="alignleft" width="596"]Image from above of a glacier, mostly white but with a large area of blue water. An Anderson woodcut print of the Grinnell glacier in Glacier National Park.[/caption] In the late oughts, Anderson heard the Rockies’ glaciers were melting. “My first thought was, this is the environment that I love, these alpine environments, the beauty of these places. I felt sad, first and foremost. And then I thought, ‘Well, who is documenting these places?’” When months of searching for someone recording the glacial recession turned up empty, Anderson decided to do it himself. “It was really out of a sense of responsibility,” he says. The three collaborators are currently wrapping up a second project, documenting glaciers in Rocky Mountain National Park. Anderson is also waiting to hear about a grant from the National Science Foundation that would send him to Antarctica. The Last Glacier is a compelling and invaluable work, said Gary Machlis, the University Professor of Environmental Sustainability and scientific adviser to the director of the National Park Service for eight years until early January 2017. “Climate change is the environmental challenge of our age, and responding to this challenge requires a constellation of voices — including those of artists like Todd. “Art can be a portal for understanding in a visceral, emotional way what science attempts to demonstrate through theory, data and analysis,” Machlis said. “Todd’s work is powerful, and his collaborative team is unique and so committed to their task. Viewing the images in ‘The Last Glacier’ is a reminder of what is at risk and what might be lost if we do not act.” In 1910, there were 150 glaciers within the new 1 million-acre Glacier National Park in Montana’s Rocky Mountains. When Anderson started his work, in 2010, all but 25 had melted. Glaciers, the marvelous remnants of the last ice age, are made from the bottom up by layer upon layer of snow that melts into ice, the accumulating weight pressing the earth, picking up and setting down boulders as they slide incrementally. For the past 7,000 years, the glaciers in the park have stretched for miles, like giant beached whales caught between mountains and frozen by time. Melting ice, rising seas 
[caption id="attachment_137032" align="alignright" width="268"]In a valley once filled by a glacier, there now are three lakes. Lakes dot a valley in Glacier National Park that a glacier once filled. Photo courtesy Todd Anderson.[/caption]

When glaciers melt they don’t simply disappear, they become water. Increasingly, they’re adding to rising sea levels. Melt from all the glaciers and ice sheets in the world are responsible for two-thirds of global sea level rise (the rest is attributed to warming seas), according to Andrew Fountain a glaciologist at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon, who agreed to write a scientific note about the next project by Anderson and his colleagues. Twenty years ago, Fountain said, alpine glaciers, like the ones in Glacier National Park, were the first to melt. “Now Greenland is beginning to melt,” he said. By 2040, with a 2-degree Celsius increase in global temperature, sea levels will rise significantly along 90 percent of the world’s coastlines, affecting hundreds of millions of people, according to a study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Fountain has introduced many artists to the wilderness in Antarctica, where he conducts some of his research. When Anderson asked him, out of the blue, to contribute to an artistic project, Fountain considered it a way to tell more people about the melting glaciers. “Getting this information out to people is super important,” said Fountain. “It’s a gateway to science. I might be attracted to the subject by graphs and plots, but others might be attracted by art.” It’s a symbiotic relationship, Anderson said, as scientists wrap the art in a scientific context. “Working with scientists is very critical to my projects. We’re trying to bridge gaps and we’re trying to connect with as many folks as we can,” Anderson said. “What the scientists provide is things that we can’t provide – analytical analysis and whole, unique perspectives of what’s going on with the landscape.” There is also common ground among artists and scientists, and aficionados of each. Science, Fountain said, can be incredibly creative, like when it’s time to choose the right approach to finding a solution. And when looking at Anderson’s art, the glaciologist sees clues to the glacier’s life, such as whether it’s advancing or retreating. Democratic medium After graduating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Anderson found work at Tandem Press, an international printing house affiliated with UW’s School of Education. Tandem has a tradition of attracting famous artists to experiment and print in its studio. David Lynch, Chuck Close, Art Spiegelman and Judy Pfaff are among its alumni. Essentially, Anderson worked with artists accustomed to producing singular pieces of art and helped them create prints that “would be totally and wholly unique, but you could make 20 or 30 of these things and more people could have it.” Printmaking, he said, “is an inherently democratic medium, and for me that was really what grabbed me.” “The Last Glacier” project is similarly intended to be shared with the masses, Anderson said. “Our mission is to get the work into the public sphere,” he said. And he wants future masses to experience the work, which makes acquisitions by the Met, the New York Public Library and the Library of Congress special. “One of the things I want to do as an artist is to talk about the immediacy of things going on in the world. But art, as I understand it and the way I approach it, it’s a multigenerational conversation,” Anderson said. In museums, “when we look at a painting from the 1800s it helps us understand what people’s values were, what people thought about. “It’s just as important when future generations who go to museums and get to see this work. It’s not just saying, ‘Oh, there used to be a glacier here,’ but it’s also saying, ‘This is a little bit about us.’ In a very, very small way. Of what we valued as a society and what we thought about, the challenges we were trying to face and engage.” Working with collaborators also amplifies the message and grows the audience. Anderson initially planned to work alone, but the glaciers were so vast and distant – 10 to 15 miles from an access road – that he enlisted Crownover and van Coller to help cover the territory. The result, Anderson said, is “three very unique artistic visions of essentially the same thing. The hope is that by presenting the viewer with three different versions of three different artists, that folks might be able to latch on. If they don’t like my work, maybe they’ll really like Bruce’s. Or if they don’t like Bruce’s, maybe they’ll like Ian’s.”
[caption id="attachment_137027" align="alignleft" width="305"]An artist uses a small chisel to slowly carve the image of a glacier. Todd Anderson, assistant professor of art and printmaking at Clemson University, carves out a “stamp” to create a reductive woodcut print of a glacier for “The Last Glacier”. (Photo by Ken Scar)[/caption]

Mirroring the glaciers  If you’ve stood on a glacier, or on a mountain two miles high, standing in front of Anderson’s finished prints will stir a familiar chill in the air, as if someone opened a window 10,000 feet up. The prints reveal scars from the violent upheaval, subduction and collision of the Earth’s crust. You’ll feel the cool blues of the ice, the ancient gray of the rock and yellow, purple, pink and blue of sunrises and sunsets seen through thin air. Anderson spent weeks each summer working in situ, researching the glaciers – which ones to document, how to access them, seeing them at different times of day as the sun shifted shadows and revealed new details. He hiked, sketched and photographed, getting to know each one before it ceased to exist. Back in his studio, where the prints come to life, a mixture of fluorescent bulbs balance the blues, reds and greens to shine as white as possible. In the middle of the space sits a printing press, perched atop tiny feet, perfectly level. The press is new; at least it’s new to Anderson. It arrived recently by freight to his home in one of Clemson’s leafy neighborhoods. The press is his six-burner gas range, where the ingredients of his art – science, nature, light and the wonder of the Rocky Mountains — mingle and fuse. Slowly, they develop as reductive woodcut prints in a process involving time, pressure and the deliberate carving of a landscape until nothing is left but a picture, a life cycle that mimics his subjects. Anderson chose to recreate the glaciers as woodcut prints because, he says, he wanted “an organic, visual language,” and woodcuts, by their nature, provide a “visual texture.” Both glaciers and prints are constructed of layers, but  while glaciers are built from the bottom, prints begin at the top. They require the artist to complete the piece in his mind, then work backward. Anderson transfers a sketch to a rectangular block of basswood, imported from Japan, then begins working in negative space – using fingers and hands that once routinely clung to rock to slowly, expertly, carve away wood, creating an image by removing what he doesn’t want in the print. The first layer he carves away, from the top of the block, will be the first image on the paper, the bottom layer of color. “I might do that 10, 15 or 20 times. So I’ll have 15 or 20 sheets of paper that look the same,” he says. “Once I’m done doing that, I’ll take that same block of wood, clean it off, carve it out a little bit more, I’ll ink it up with a new color this time, then I’ll print it on top of what I printed before.” He has to print light colors first, and he’s constantly calculating “the value of the color and the opacity of my ink, so that I can make a whole image look right. At least in my mind how it looks right.” One layer, one carving, one color, one pressing at a time, all the while thinking backwards, or upside down, removing negative space from the top that becomes the bottom. Eventually, the full image appears. But, at a cost. “By the time I get done making these artworks, the blocks themselves are really exhausted, and there’s no way of going back and remaking the artwork,” Anderson says. “The process is mirroring the fate of the glaciers themselves.” Anderson said he doesn’t create “message” art. He’s not delivering a political statement. Not directly, anyway. “There’s a complexity to these ideas” of art, experience, climate change, he said. “What I’m trying to present as an artist is visual complexity. But there’s moments where, when it works right, you can get lost in these things and you start seeing the cobwebs. You start seeing things. There’s an experience that art can give you, which is just wonder, and that’s what I’m trying to do.” Anderson received funding from the South Carolina Arts Commission, the Sustainable Arts Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts for this work. For more information, and to see the work by Crownover and van Coller, go to TheLastGlacier.com.

Grants available for arts programs, professional development and arts classroom supplies

[caption id="attachment_29193" align="alignright" width="250"]Laurens County Community Theatre Laurens County Community Theatre received a quarterly grant for a production of Aladdin Jr.[/caption] February 15 is the next deadline. Quarterly Project Support grants can help fund arts projects and programs or professional development opportunities for artistic and managerial staff. This program also supports arts activities that promote an individual artist’s professional development or career advancement. Examples of funded projects include support for an international artist residency, an online arts calendar and attendance at an arts conference. Teacher Standards Implementation grants help arts teachers acquire the supplies, materials and expertise necessary for meeting the 2010 Visual and Performing Arts Academic Standards. TSI funds may be used to pay for consumable and non-consumable resources and teacher professional development. Examples of funded items include the purchase of string instruments, music books and equipment to teach digital animation. How to apply Quarterly Project Support and TSI grants offer four opportunities to apply each year with these deadlines: May 15, August 15, November 15 and February 15. Quarterly Project Support grants for artists or organizations:

  • First, review this introductory page to find out if you live in a county covered by one of the Arts Commission’s subgranting organizations. If you do, you should apply to that organization for quarterly projects.  (The Arts Commission grants funds to these subgranting organizations for this purpose.)
  • If not, read the quarterly project guidelines for artists or organizations for complete application instructions.
Teacher Standards Implementation grants:
  • Applicants must be public, private, charter, or parochial schools in South Carolina.
  • More than one teacher from a school may apply.
  • Teachers at ABC sites are not eligible.
  • Read the TSI guidelines for complete application instructions.
For both Quarterly and TSI grants, you may contact your county or discipline coordinator to discuss your project before applying or for help during the application process. Be sure to check out currently funded grant awards for more ideas about eligible projects.

Grants available for arts projects, professional development, and classroom resources

November 15 is the next deadline. Quarterly Project Support grants can help fund arts projects and programs or professional development opportunities for artistic and managerial staff. This program also supports arts activities that promote an individual artist’s professional development or career advancement. Examples of funded projects include support for an international artist residency, an online arts calendar and attendance at an arts conference. Teacher Standards Implementation grants help arts teachers acquire the supplies, materials and expertise necessary for meeting the 2010 Visual and Performing Arts Academic Standards. TSI funds may be used to pay for consumable and non-consumable resources and teacher professional development. Examples of funded items include the purchase of string instruments, music books and equipment to teach digital animation. How to apply Quarterly Project Support and TSI grants offer four opportunities to apply each year with these deadlines: May 15, August 15, November 15 and February 15. Quarterly Project Support grants for artists or organizations:

  • First, review this introductory page to find out if you live in a county covered by one of the Arts Commission’s subgranting organizations. If you do, you should apply to that organization for quarterly projects.  (The Arts Commission grants funds to these subgranting organizations for this purpose.)
  • If not, read the quarterly project guidelines for artists or organizations for complete application instructions.
Teacher Standards Implementation grants:
  • Applicants must be public, private, charter, or parochial schools in South Carolina.
  • More than one teacher from a school may apply.
  • Teachers at ABC sites are not eligible.
  • Read the TSI guidelines for complete application instructions.
For both Quarterly and TSI grants, you may contact your county or discipline coordinator to discuss your project before applying or for help during the application process. Be sure to check out currently funded grant awards for more ideas about eligible projects. Image: Brunson Elementary School in Hampton School District One received a TSI grant in 2015 to purchase paint and brushes.

SC Arts Commission accepting applications for quarterly project and teacher assistance grants

August 15 is the next deadline. Quarterly Project Support grants can help fund arts projects and programs or professional development opportunities for artistic and managerial staff. This program also supports arts activities that promote an individual artist's professional development or career advancement. Examples of projects funded this year include support for an international artist residency, an online arts calendar and attendance at an arts conference. Teacher Standards Implementation grants help arts teachers acquire the supplies, materials and expertise necessary for meeting the 2010 Visual and Performing Arts Academic Standards. TSI funds may be used to pay for consumable and non-consumable resources and teacher professional development. Examples of items funded this year include the purchase of string instruments, music books and equipment to teach digital animation. How to apply Quarterly Project Support and TSI grants offer four opportunities to apply each year with these deadlines: May 15, August 15, November 15 and February 15. Quarterly Project Support grants for artists or organizations:

  • First, review this introductory page to find out if you live in a county covered by one of the Arts Commission's subgranting organizations. If you do, you should apply to that organization for quarterly projects.  (The Arts Commission grants funds to these subgranting organizations for this purpose.)
  • If not, read the quarterly project guidelines for artists or organizations for complete application instructions.
Teacher Standards Implementation grants:
  • Applicants must be public, private, charter, or parochial schools in South Carolina.
  • More than one teacher from a school may apply.
  • Teachers at ABC sites are not eligible.
  • Read the TSI guidelines for complete application instructions.
For both Quarterly and TSI grants, you may contact your county or discipline coordinator to discuss your project before applying or for help during the application process. Be sure to check out currently funded grant awards for more ideas about eligible projects. Image: Brunson Elementary School in Hampton School District One received a TSI grant in 2015 to purchase paint and brushes.

Grant money lights the furnace for Conway Glass

From MyrtleBeachOnline.com Article by Elizabeth Townsend, photos by Charles Slate

Newly awarded grant money is firing up the furnace at Conway Glass this fall. Ed Streeter, co-owner and visual artist, will use the grant funding to fan the flames of his monthly Saturday glass-blowing demonstrations, which are instructional presentations that show off traditional and experimental techniques in the ancient art of glass blowing to a crowd that grows each year. This year’s first demonstration will be held on Oct. 3 – the same day as the City of Conway’s Fall Festival and the Live Oak Festival events, which will feature arts and crafts vendors and musical entertainment.
During the demonstrations, Streeter works with 2,150-degree heat as he pulls molten globs of glass from the fire and fashions them into pieces of art before an audience in his studio at the back of Conway Glass, at 209 Laurel St. “It’s transformative. They start with a blob of molten nothing and in a brief time colors are introduced and then the little blob of glass is turned into a bowl or vessel, and it’s really fun to watch that happen right before you,” Jim Arendt said, who is also an area artist and has attended the demonstrations for the past five years with his wife and three children. Additionally, Arendt is the director of the Rebecca Randall Bryan Gallery at Coastal Carolina University. Ed is assisted by his wife Barbara, who is also co-owner and a visual artist at Conway Glass. Barbara usually narrates as Ed creates during the 45-minute presentations for audiences, ranging from 20 to sometimes 60 people an hour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on the first Saturday of every month. “It’s very informative, yet informal. We just have a good time. It’s fun for all ages,” Barbara said of the demonstrations. The Streeters are also occasionally assisted by friend and fellow glass-blowing artist Wayne Fitzgerald, who visits the studio about once a year from the Philadelphia area. Together, the Streeters have been putting on the glass-blowing demonstrations for roughly 15 years and have watched the crowds grow steadily each year. “On a cold fall day, it’s the hottest ticket in town,” Arendt said.
Conway GlassThe demonstrations are often themed; during October it’s glass pumpkins, December brings Christmastime decorations. About 500 spectators came to presentations on a January Saturday when old beer bottles were refurbished into drinking glasses. Flames of the furnace are also sometimes used to make popcorn for audiences and lunches for the Streeters while they’re in between shows. “I would absolutely love to attend the demos. I plan to go to as many as I possibly can,” said Melaney Mills, who is from Lake City but previously lived in the Myrtle Beach area for years. She has heard great things about the demonstrations at Conway Glass and is excited to attend future events. Mills said she enjoys the arts and dabbles in them herself. “I love the vibrant colors in the glass. It’s all so beautiful to me,” she said as she looked around at all the shiny merchandise at Conway Glass. The storefront of Conway Glass is simple, but within is a wonderland of glass orbs and ornaments, of stained glass mosaics and an array of handcrafted merchandise, big and small. The Streeters also specialize in other glass needs such as commercial and residential products, including windows, mirrors, shower doors, safety glass and more. Through a small hallway past the store’s front space and down the rabbit hole, is a large workshop studio where the demonstrations take place. It was revamped last year when Barbara was awarded a $5,000 grant from the S.C. Arts Commission that allowed her to add new video equipment, lighting and other technical improvements, which gave audiences a better view of all the action, Barbara said. The grant money also helped the couple hold the glassblowing demonstrations from October to May 2014 and propelled Barbara’s experimental glass-blowing theater project, which featured two plays with glass-blowing fused into the plots and a performance by a glass-blowing magician. After Barbara and 15 actors put in roughly 700 volunteer hours preparing, every one of the 100 tickets available to each blackbox-theater style event at about $18.50 a piece sold out. Barbara said she would love to do the events again, and may apply for more grant money to continue them. “Conway Glass is a real treasure. A glass-blowing studio is a rare thing in the state to begin with, so to have one in our backyard is really nice,” Arendt said. This year, Ed was awarded a $1,000 Quarterly Project Support for Artist Grant by the South Carolina Arts Commission for the 2016 fiscal year to help keep the demonstrations going. The Streeters said the funding helps pay for advertising, materials and time as the couple devotes an entire day to giving the public a free view of traditional and experimental glass blowing. The Quarterly Project Support for Artists is partly funded by the National Endowment of the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. Conway Glass is also helping Ed meet his obligation of matching the arts commission grant with local dollars. “I was just floored when I got the grant. It’s pretty exciting to be recognized by the S.C. Arts Commission,” Ed said. With this grant the Streeters will put on demonstrations on Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5. The couple will apply for another quarterly grant to hold more presentations the first Saturday of each month from January to May. The Streeters offer classes from October through May from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays when demonstrations aren’t being held, and hold them on Thursdays as well. Walk-ins are welcome on Thursdays, but the Streeters request calling for an appointment on Saturdays. Prices range from $28 to $325 per class, depending on what people would like to learn.

More than glass

In addition to their glass-blowing studio projects, the Streeters are stay active in the emerging art scene in Conway. Barbara is executive director of the organization CREATE!, which is a nonprofit 501 C-4 membership organization formed in 2011 and designed by local artists to celebrate and promote the arts in the community. Grant money was also awarded to the group over the summer, including more than $800 from the S.C. Arts Commission, $2,000 from the Waccamaw Foundation and $2,500 from the City of Conway, the Streeters said. CREATE! has about 30 members and is growing each year as more artists participate. The organization gained an administrative office space this year in the Conway Innovation Center near the Streeters’ glass studio in downtown Conway, but Barbara said the growing group desperately needs a bigger space. “I love watching it grow from just a few individuals to a recognized group trying to bring more art to Conway,” Jesse Nevins, membership coordinator and teacher with CREATE!, said in an email. Nevins has been a member of CREATE! for two years and teaches an after-school program for elementary school-age kids from 4 to 6 p.m. on Thursdays at the Mary Thompson building in Collins Park. She also keeps up with CREATE! members and recruits new ones. Nevins was has an art degree from Coastal Carolina University and joined CREATE! after finishing college. She said got involved with CREATE! because she wanted to work with an artist group that was “cutting edge” and “community focused.” “As an artist sometimes you can feel really alone in facing the problems of making. It’s nice to be able to share your frustrations with others who understand and bounce ideas around with others who have a background in art,” Nevins said. The organization’s website has also been revamped and a cultural events calendar was just added. The cultural calendar highlights creative events happening around Horry County such as art openings, cooking classes, wine tastings, plays and more. The Streeters also just established the Conway Cultural Development Corporation in April, which is dedicated to stimulating economic growth in the Conway area through the creation of a vibrant art scene. The Streeters said dollars stay around the Rivertown when cultural events and festivals are held as participants patronize area restaurants and shops, spurring the local economy in the process. Arendt and Mills both said when they visit Conway Glass they eat at area restaurants, shop at the Conway Farmer’s Market and visit other downtown stores. The organization envisions working with local municipalities’ planning departments to work with area artists using both public and private dollars to find a cooperative space for artists to create and to establish an art district in the community. A big project in the works for the CCDC is the creations of the Waccamaw Art & Design Center-MakerSpace — a cooperative gallery and studio in Conway that would allow members to use a shared space with tools and equipment, including a 3D printer, a laser cutter and industrial sewing machines. The nonprofit also hopes to set up a rental studio to recruit and launch design- and art-based companies. “Just having a group advocate for arts in the community is really important. Numerous studies have shown that art-focused communities have a better economic outlook and happier residents. It’s important to have people that care about the arts creating spaces and events for their neighbors to enjoy,” Nevins said. Barbara said the organization has looked at several properties but hasn’t found the right one yet. She said the organization wants to find the right space for area artists to call a creative home, and needs to be choosy to find a property that would suit the needs of a variety of different artists. “The center will really create an energy among the artists as they inspire each other, and if we can create that kind of energy, the sky’s the limit for Conway and Horry County together,” Ed said.

The couple

Ed and Barbara Streeter have been married for 29 years and have operated Conway Glass since 1990. The glass gods slowly sifted the sands of time to bring them together as they both moved to South Carolina in 1968 from different parts of the Northeast. Ed moved to the Myrtle Beach area from Rome, an upstate New York town, after his father was stationed at the Myrtle Beach Air Force base. Barbara, originally from Winslow, N.J., had relocated to Philadelphia with her family before her father got a job transfer to a textile plant in Spartanburg. Barbara has a genetic love for glass which she got from her great-great-grandfather, who was a master glassblower in Winslow in the 1800s. When Barbara was a child, she and her grandmother would take walks on the dirt road near their home leading by the an old, closed-down glass company, collecting bits of scrap glass along the way and fostering her hereditary love for glass. In 1979, Ed got a job out of high school working with glass. Barbara said Ed worked in the Spartanburg area the same time she lived there, but they never ran into each other, despite spending time at some of the same places. “We must have crossed paths several times over the course of 20 years, but we never actually met,” Barbara said. It wasn’t until summer 1985 that the couple would meet poolside at the Arcadian Dunes while vacationing in Myrtle Beach. They married a year later and opened their first glass business. “It was just meant to be,” Barbara said. The couple still pays nostalgic trips to the Arcadian Dunes from time to time. The Streeters started Conway Glass Works on Main Street with friend George McCorkle, who was guitarist and founding member of the Spartanburg-based, classic rock legend The Marshall Tucker Band. Together, the group ran the shop for about three years until the Streeters wanted to grow bigger in the glass business and arts and McCorkle wanted to stay small. The Streeters then opened Conway Glass in 1990. The couple has been perfecting their glass-blowing skills over the years by studying at various schools, including Penland School of Crafts in North Carolina, Wheaton Village in Millville, N.J., and the Studio at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York. Barbara attributes their success personally and professionally to Ed’s steady patience and their ability to work together as a team, each combining their skill sets to fuse something strong. “It’s been an amazing journey,” Barbara said of their nearly three-decade partnership. “It’s a wonderful life. When you wake up happy to go to work together every morning — that’s a good thing.”
MORE INFORMATION For more information about Conway Glass and the glass blowing demonstrations, visit http:// www.conwayglass.com or call 843-248-3558. Glass-blowing demonstrations will be held the first Saturday of each month starting Oct. 3 to May 7 at Conway Glass at 209 Laurel St. in downtown Conway and are free and open to the public. Glass-blowing classes are offered at Conway Glass from October through May from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays when demonstrations aren’t being held by appointment and on walk-ins are welcome on Thursdays. Prices range from $28 to $325 per class. For more about CREATE!, visit http://createconway.wildapricot.org/ or call 843-248-4527. To see a calendar filled with cultural events, visit http://createconway.org/arts_calendar.

Artist Susan Lenz takes her “Wall of Keys” to England

[caption id="attachment_22021" align="alignright" width="200"]Lenz installing Wall of Keys Lenz installing Wall of Keys[/caption] Columbia artist Susan Lenz received a South Carolina Arts Commission Quarterly Project grant to help support installation of her work, The Wall of Keys, at the Festival of Quilts held Aug. 6-9 in Birmingham, England. Lenz was invited to show her work and present two lectures during the exhibition Maker, Making, Made, curated by Through Our Hands, an international invitational group of leading textile artists. The Festival of Quilts is Europe’s leading patchwork and quilt show and includes more than 25 curated exhibition areas, 300 vendors, 1,000 competition quilts and 180 workshops and lectures. The Wall of Keys is a site-specific installation of 1,800-plus keys with handmade paper tags attached using a unique zigzag-stitched piece of cording. The tags include individual letters clipped from new and vintage magazines, sheet music and other print materials. The Wall of Keys confronts viewers with countless human desires for real and imagined locations in life, such as “The Key to Happiness,” “The Key to Fame and Fortune,” “The Key to a Fast Internet Connection,” and "The Key to Failure." Since returning from England, Lenz has installed The Wall of Keys at her business, The Mouse House, 2123 Park Street, Columbia. Visitors may drop by without an appointment Monday – Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. [caption id="attachment_22024" align="alignleft" width="225"]Susan Lenz, Wall of Keys Wall of Keys at The Mouse House. (click for larger image.)[/caption] Visit Lenz's blog, Art in Stitches, to read more about her experience (Part 1) and view photos of works (Part 2) exhibited at the festival. The Quarterly Project grant program is designed to support specific arts activities that promote an individual artist's professional development or career advancement. Projects that promote excellence in an arts discipline and make such excellence accessible for general community-wide audiences are also encouraged. The program is funded in part by a generous award from the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of The Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina. The next Quarterly Project grant application deadline is Nov. 15, 2015. Top image: An exhibition visitor snaps a photo of The Wall of Keys. All photos courtesy of Susan Lenz.

Conway glassblower receives grant to keep up the good work

From SCNow.com

[caption id="attachment_21678" align="alignright" width="300"]Conway Glass Glassblower Ed Streeter demonstrates his art on First Saturdays in Conway[/caption] CONWAY, S.C. – Ed Streeter of Conway has been awarded a $1,000 Quarterly Project Support for Artists grant by the South Carolina Arts Commission for the 2016 fiscal year. The support will allow Streeter to present the First Saturday glassblowing demonstrations. The demonstrations are free and enable the public to see and learn about the traditional craft of glassblowing. The Quarterly Project Support for Artists, which is funded in part by the National Endowment of the Arts and the John and Susan Bennett Memorial Arts Fund of the Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina, will allow Streeter and Conway Glass to host glassblowing demonstrations free to the public on Oct. 3, Nov. 7 and Dec. 5. Streeter said he is proud to continue the tradition of offering free glass demos and is honored to be recognized by the South Carolina Arts Commission for his dedication in bringing art to the public. "On the First Saturday I create colorful bowls, vessels and sculpture with 2,000 degree glass and demonstrate various traditional and experimental glass techniques. Assisted by my wife, Barbara, our demonstrations are both educational and entertaining." In Streeter's Conway studio he creates custom stained glass windows and blown glass vessels and sculpture. In addition, he teaches glass classes and demonstrates various glass techniques to the community.

Hilton Head community sings lasting tribute to one of its own

The Hilton Head Choral Society will perform "Music from the Stage" at 8 p.m. March 21 at First Presbyterian Church on Hilton Head Island. The show includes a piece commissioned by artistic director Tim Reynolds to honor Sarah Creech, a "child of the stage" who died in 2012 at age 27. The choral society received a grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission to help fund the composition. More from David Lauderdale with the Island Packet:

Sarah CreechA hundred voices will honor Sarah Creech on Friday night, but her life was a blend of a much larger chorus line. She was a child of the theater on Hilton Head Island, often dancing on stage while her mother, Janice, played the piano in the orchestra pit. She took her talents to New York City before deciding to follow her father in the field of law. On Saturday, Feb. 11, 2012, Sarah took a board test for law school. The next night, she died unexpectedly of an acute asthma attack. She was only 27. Janice will be at the keyboard Friday night at First Presbyterian Church when the Choral Society performs its spring concert, "Music from the Stage." Midway through the show will come a piece commissioned by artistic director Tim Reynolds to honor Sarah. Broadway composer Georgia Stitt calls her musical rendition of a popular poem from the 1930s, "Don't Stand at My Grave." Janice Creech, whose husband, Bill, died seven years to the day before Sarah, said, "This piece reminds me very much of Sarah. I think she would be saying that very thing: 'Stop crying. I'm not there.' " Janice said she is humbled by the tribute. "As a mom, it's always nice to hear your daughter mentioned," she said. "When you lose a child -- or any loved one -- sometimes people won't say anything. They don't talk about it because they don't want to make me uncomfortable. But I'm really happy to hear people remember Sarah." MANY VOICES Remembering Sarah is to hear a large chorus of individuals and institutions, a sophisticated group for a small town. Sarah was a seventh-grader when her family moved to the island from Roanoke, Va. Janice was hired to play piano for "My Fair Lady" at the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina, and Sarah tagged along for rehearsals. She was smitten not only by the stage and the cast of characters in the green room, but by Meredith Inglesby playing Eliza Doolittle. Sarah's life would never be the same. Inglesby is a child of Hilton Head's stage, now performing on Broadway. Her family roots include beautiful writing about the Lowcountry by her relative Edith Inglesby. Casey Colgan, a longtime director at the arts center, became a mentor to Sarah, pushing her to be her best in show after show on the island stage, even after she graduated from the University of Virginia. Sarah was taught dance by John Carlyle and Karena Brock-Carlyle at the Hilton Head Dance Theatre. She was taught to play piano by Louise Lewis. Penny Rose taught her to play the flute. She watched as her mother accompanied the Choral Society and its Youth Choir and served as music director at the S.C. Repertory Company on Beach City Road. Sarah and Anna Cauthen were invited by Dr. Jack McConnell to dance with him at Harlem's Apollo Theatre when the Jazz Foundation of America honored him for developing a health care clinic in New Orleans for jazz musicians and their families. Bill Cosby was the emcee. She was engaged to be married to Scott Gruber, another child of the local theater, particularly Seahawks Stage Productions at Hilton Head Island High School. DON'T WEEP In 2001, Georgia Stitt was music director of "Anything Goes" at the island arts center. Janice was the accompanist. The two remain close friends. Tim Reynolds turned to Stitt when he wanted to find a personal, lasting way to honor Sarah. "He could have picked any piece and said it was done to honor Sarah, but something new has been created," Stitt said. "It is organically part of the community. It was written and will be performed by people who knew Sarah. And really, it is only because of community we create anything." She said they did not want a maudlin piece, and that's not what they got. If Sarah could literally tell the community that nurtured her not to stand by her grave and weep, it might come from words she chose for her valedictory address for the Heritage Academy class of 2003: "Learn from your mistakes. Mistakes will be made; you'll also have regrets, but don't dwell on those regrets. Live for today, the here and now, because at any moment, our lives could change drastically, abruptly launching us into an unexpected world. "Billy Joel wrote, 'I was dreaming of tomorrow so I sacrificed today, and it sure was a grand waste of time.' Time is so precious. Don't waste it." IF YOU GO The Hilton Head Choral Society will perform "Music from the Stage" at 8 p.m. Friday at First Presbyterian Church on Hilton Head Island. Tickets may be ordered at www.hiltonheadchoralsociety.org or at local businesses. Details: 843-341-3818.

by Thomas Hudgins and Dr. Andrew Levin

Greenville father-daughter duo to perform with Clemson University Symphony Orchestra

Father-daughter bonding takes many forms, but it isn’t often that it takes the form of virtuoso classical music performance. Fabio and Maria Parrini are that rare duo. Father Fabio and his 16-year-old daughter, Maria, are both world-class pianists based in Greenville who will perform with the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra, under the baton of Dr. Andrew Levin, on April 1, at 8 p.m., at the Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. Levin is familiar with both artists. “Fabio has performed twice with the orchestra in the past,” he says. “Then Maria played a few years ago as a winner of our concerto competition as a cellist rather than a pianist. A while later, I attended a performance of the Greenville County Youth Orchestra in which Maria played a piano concerto. As I was waiting outside for the concert to begin, it suddenly struck me that we should find a piece where we could feature the two of them together." It wasn’t long before that idea became reality. Discussion of such an event began that evening, as it was on Fabio’s "bucket list" to perform a concerto with his daughter. Levin, who received a grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission for this project, says the concert has been a long time coming. “It's been in the planning stages for two years and I'm excited to finally be able to lead this great event.” Daughters who attend the performance with their fathers will receive free admission. Just stop by the box office before the performance and inform box office manager Nancy Martin, or one of the box office attendants, or contact Martin for more information at nmartin@clemson.edu or (864) 656-7787. Fabio Parrini has performed twice before with the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra: first in Beethoven’s Fourth Piano Concerto, then in Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with his brother and sister. Mr. Parrini is professor of music and piano coordinator at North Greenville University, as well as an active adjudicator. He has won numerous international piano competitions and has given master classes across the country. In addition to performing on several recordings and television broadcasts, Mr. Parrini is a Steinway Artist who is repeatedly selected for programs sponsored by South Arts and the South Carolina Arts Commission. His daughter, Maria, is a senior at Wade Hampton and the Greenville Fine Arts Center. She has studied piano since the age of three and has also studied cello with Martha Brons and Christopher Hutton. A member of the Fine Arts Center’s chamber music program as both a pianist and cellist, Ms. Parrini made her orchestra solo debut as a 13-year-old playing a cello concerto with the Clemson University Symphony Orchestra. She has won several piano competitions, including the Jan and Beattie Wood Concerto. Passionate about spreading music in her community, Ms. Parrini organized a benefit concert for the South Carolina Upstate Homeless Coalition in November, and she regularly teaches strings to students at the Frazee Dream Center in downtown Greenville, South Carolina. The pair will perform in the first half of the concert. They begin with Claude Debussy’s Petite Suite. This work, originally composed for piano four hands when the composer was in his twenties, was orchestrated by Debussy's friend and composer Henri Büsser twenty years later. Debussy liked the arrangement so well that he even conducted it in concerts around Europe. The work is in four movements: In a Boat (Sailing), Cortège, Menuet, and Ballet. The entire work is light, tuneful, at times dancelike, and engaging from start to finish. The featured work is the Concerto for Two Pianos and Orchestra by 20th century French composer Francis Poulenc. This piece is for two pianos, which dance around each other, play together, and play against each other. There is much of the "perpetual mobile" about this work, the constant running of notes in a seemingly never-ending rush of excitement. Throw into the mix some good humor and some French café music and you end up with an irresistible work, in three exciting movements. “The Poulenc is a very engaging, rollicking, and serious, work that should be quite entertaining for the audience,” says Levin, “even if they are not familiar with the piece or composer.” It is a unique piece in that it captures different styles. “There's a bit of the dance hall in the music as well as some heart-wrenchingly beautiful melodies.” After intermission the orchestra presents the well-known Finlandia by Jean Sibelius. This work was composed in nationalistic fervor against censorship by the Russian Empire, rulers over Finland for almost a century. The work was first performed under a variety of alternate names to evade censorship, but it was immediately understood as a work promoting the sounds and soul of the Finnish people. The slow melody in the middle has become a national hymn of Finland and has even become a popular Christian hymn under the name "Be Still, My Soul." As a change from orchestral music, the Clemson University Trio will perform an early work by Beethoven, his Variations on "Là ci darem la mano," an aria from Mozart's opera "Don Giovanni." Originally for two oboes and English horn, this performance will feature an oboist, violinist and cellist from the orchestra. Beethoven first states the familiar tune, then subjects it to a variety of changes, of melody, harmony, accompaniment – even key and meter, yet the melody remains recognizable throughout. The concert will conclude with music from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Rings, composed by Howard Shore. This familiar and exciting music features all sections of the orchestra: strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion, for a rousing conclusion to the concert. “[The Parrinis] are both gracious people who have the music itself as their primary focus,” says Levin. “This isn't about them, but about preparing and presenting this wonderful concerto in the best possible light. It will be a joy to present this concerto to the audience.” Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students and are available for purchase online at www.clemson.edu/Brooks and through the box office at (864) 656-7787 from 1 to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Grants awarded for project support and arts classroom needs

Next application deadline: February 15, 2013 The South Carolina Arts Commission has announced recipients for third quarter project support grants and Teacher Standards Implementation grants. Quarterly Project Support is designed to help fund a variety of quality arts projects and programs or professional development opportunities for artistic and managerial staff. This category also supports specific arts activities that promote an individual artist's professional development or career advancement. Examples of projects funded this year include community concerts, a keyboard for a choir, and a master class fee for an artist. Teacher Standards Implementation grants help arts teachers acquire the supplies, materials and expertise necessary for meeting the 2010 Visual and Performing Arts Academic Standards. TSI funds may be used to pay for consumable and non-consumable resources and teacher professional development. Examples of items funded this year include clay and supplies for ceramics class, sheet music and CDs for music class, an iPod, projector and screen, and a residency with a Shakespearean actor/director. How to apply Quarterly Project Support and TSI grants both offer four opportunities to apply each year with these deadlines: May 15, August 15, November 15 and February 15. Quarterly Project Support grants for artists or organizations:

  • First, review this introductory page to find out if you live in a county covered by one of the Arts Commission's subgranting organizations. If you do, you should apply to that organization for quarterly projects.  (The Arts Commission grants funds to these subgranting organizations for this purpose.)
  • If not, read the quarterly project guidelines for artists or organizations for complete application instructions.
Teacher Standards Implementation grants:
  • Applicants must be public, private, charter, or parochial schools in South Carolina.
  • More than one teacher from a school may apply.
  • Teachers at ABC sites are not eligible.
  • Read the TSI guidelines for complete application instructions.
For both Quarterly and TSI grants, you may contact your county or discipline coordinator to discuss your project before applying or for help during the application process. Be sure to check out currently funded grant awards for more ideas about eligible projects.