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Jason Rapp

SCAC announces four 2021 fellowship recipients

Individual excellence in writing, dance honored


for immediate release

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Hard work and exceptional abilities are earning fellowships for four South Carolina artists practicing in the dance and writing disciplines from the South Carolina Arts Commission for fiscal year 2021.

The South Carolina Arts Commission (SCAC) Board of Directors approved four $5,000 fellowships among several other FY21 grant awards to be announced at a later date. The SCAC’s four fellows are:
  • Sarah Blackman of Greenville County in prose,
  • John Pursley III of Greenville County for poetry,
  • Erin Bailey of Richland County for dance choreography,
  • and Tanya Wideman-Davis of Richland County for dance performance.
Individual artists residing in South Carolina full-time whose work covers prose, poetry, dance choreography, and dance performance were invited to apply last fall for fiscal year 2021 awards. Out-of-state panelists from each discipline reviewed applications and, based solely on blind reviews of anonymous work samples, recommend recipients of each $5,000 fellowship. “Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of exceptional South Carolina individual artists. Recognition from a fellowship lends artistic prestige and can often open doors to other resources and employment opportunities,” SCAC Executive Director David Platts said. A diverse group of panelists judged the nominees applying to the FY21 disciplines in which they work. The poetry panelists were Joseph Bathanti, writer-in-residence at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina; author Sandra Beasley, an instructor with the University of Tampa who lives in Washington; and publisher Lucinda Clark, principal with the Poetry Matters Project in Augusta, Georgia. Author/educator Catherine Reid of Burnsville, North Carolina and Charlie Vazquez, a consultant in New York City, judged the prose applicants. Panelists of the dance performance applicants were Laurel Lawson of Atlanta, Georgia with Full Radius Dance and Tamara Nadel of Minneapolis, Minnesota with Ragamala Dance Company. Maura Garcia, principal of Maura Garcia Dance in Chapel Hill, North Carolina; and Patrick Makuakane of San Francisco, California with Nā Lei Hulu i ka Wēkiu Dance Company served as panelists of the dance choreography applicants. Four fellowships per year are awarded to artists working in rotating disciplines. One artist from each of these fields: visual arts, craft, media: production, and media: screenwriting will be honored in fiscal year 2022. To be eligible, artists must be at least 18 years old and a legal U.S. resident with permanent residence in the state for two years prior to the application date and throughout the fellowship period. Applications will be accepted later this summer following announcement by the SCAC. For more on discipline rotation, eligibility requirements, and the application process, please visit https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/grant/fel/.

About the FY21 Individual Artist Fellowship Recipients

Sarah Blackman | Prose | Greenville County Sarah Blackman is the director of creative writing at the Fine Arts Center, an arts-centered public high school in Greenville, South Carolina. Her poetry and prose have been published in a number of journals, magazines, and anthologies and she has been featured on the Poetry Daily website. Blackman is the co-fiction editor of Diagram, the online journal of experimental prose, poetry and schematics; and the founding editor of Crashtest, an online magazine for high school age writers she edits alongside her Fine Arts Center students. Her story collection Mother Box, published by FC2 in 2013, was the winner of the 2012 Ronald Sukenick/American Book Review Innovative Fiction Prize. Her novel, Hex, was published by FC2 in April 2016 and in 2018 she joined its board. John Pursley III | Poetry | Greenville County John Pursley III teaches contemporary literature and poetry at Clemson University, where he also directs the annual Clemson Literary Festival. He is the author of the poetry collection, If You Have Ghosts (Zone 3 Press), as well as the chapbooks, A Story without Poverty (South Carolina Poetry Initiative) and A Conventional Weather (New Michigan Press), among others. In addition, he works as the poetry editor of Burnside Review and is an assistant editor for the South Carolina Review. His poems and reviews have appeared in Poetry, AGNI, Colorado Review, Kenyon Review, and elsewhere. Erin Bailey | Dance: Choreography | Richland County Erin Bailey is a South Carolina native who discovered her passion for dance at the Fine Arts Center in Greenville. She has degrees from Columbia College (BFA) and Texas Women’s University (MFA) and has her certification and licensure in massage. She is an adjunct dance professor at Columbia and Coker colleges and the University of South Carolina. Bailey has worked and performed with Columbia area dance companies since 2004 and has performed nationally and internationally at festivals like Piccolo Spoleto in Charleston. In 2018 she founded and remains artistic director of Moving Body Dance Company. She has twice received awards for her choreography work. Photo by Jesse Scroggins. Tanya Wideman-Davis | Dance: Performance | Richland County Tanya Wideman-Davis is the co-director of Wideman Davis Dance and is on faculty as associate professor at the University of South Carolina in the Department of Theatre and Dance and African American Studies. With an extensive career as a dancer, choreographer, and teacher, she completed her Master of Fine Arts from Hollins University/ADF (2012). Tanya has danced with many world-renowned companies, including Dance Theatre of Harlem, Joffrey Ballet, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, Alonzo King Lines Ballet, Spectrum Dance Theater, Ballet NY, and as guest artist with Ballet Memphis, Cleveland San Jose Ballet, and Quorum Ballet (Portugal).  She received international acclaim as “Best Female Dancer of 2001-2002” from Dance Europe magazine. Photo by Sammy Lopez.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing grants, direct programs, staff assistance and partnerships in three key areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

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Metropolitan Arts Council distributes relief funding in Greenville Co.

In conjunction with the Graham Foundation and the Canal Charitable Foundation, the Metropolitan Arts Council of Greenville is distributing $275,500 to 28 local arts organizations.

Metropolitan Arts Council“All of us at MAC are very pleased to be in a position to raise and provide this level of funding for these organizations that are such important assets to Greenville,” said Alan Ethridge, MAC executive director. The fund was started with a $102,000 withdrawal from the MAC Endowment for the Arts which was established in 2009 for the organization’s grants program.  “This is the first time we have withdrawn any funds from the endowment, but it was very important to do so given the projected losses of so many arts organizations,” said MAC board chairman Michael Cooper of TD Bank. “Once we realized the severity of the economic downturn caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the MAC board and staff went immediately to work to begin a relief fund.” “The Graham Foundation and the Canal Charitable Foundation contributed to the fund very generously,” Ethridge continued.  “Greenville is so fortunate to have such philanthropic partners who realize the importance of the arts in the vitality of our amazing city.  Throughout their histories, both entities have ensured that the arts have had a very visible presence in the community by providing very substantial funding to cultural initiatives.  It is a privilege to be working with both of them during these challenging times.” “Arts organizations have had to cancel/postpone performances, events, exhibits and fundraisers. That loss of income can be devastating. These relief funds will have a tremendous impact on our cultural community,” Artisphere Executive Director Kerry Murphy said. Holly Caprell, Greenville County Youth Orchestra executive director said, “I am so thankful for MAC’s dedication to helping small organizations like ours.  Looking ahead to our next season, there are so many unknowns.  This grant will help us bridge funding gaps and give us the freedom to plan projects that will encourage our students to grow musically.” Ethridge also said that additional relief funding may be necessary as we are not yet familiar with the distancing norms for the latter part of the year and 2021. “MAC will certainly assess the future needs of our organizational constituents and perhaps be able to provide additional relief funding. I certainly want to thank the MAC board of directors and staff, the executive committee and the endowment committee for making sure the fund came to fruition.” The 28 arts organizations receiving funding are Artisphere, Carolina Dance Collaborative, Carolina Music Museum, Centre Stage, Chicora Voices, Emrys, Foothills Philharmonic, GLOW Lyric Theatre, Greenville Center for Creative Arts, Greenville Chautauqua Society, Greenville Chorale, Greenville Concert Band, Greenville County Museum of Art, Greenville County Youth Orchestra, Greenville Jazz Collective, Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Greenville Theatre, Greer Cultural Arts Council, International Ballet, Makers Collective (Indie Craft Parade), Mauldin Cultural Center, Peace Center, SC Bach, South Carolina Children’s Theatre, Vaughn Newman Dance, The Warehouse Theatre, Wits End Poetry and Younts Center for Performing Arts.

Jason Rapp

GCCA makes call for Brandon Fellowship artists

Application deadline: July 9, 2020


Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA) is seeking artists to apply for the 2020-21 Brandon Fellowship, a high-profile, 12-month program for artists between 21-30 years of age who are eager to advance their careers as working artists.

Successful candidates will demonstrate promising talent, self-motivation, and goal-orientation. Each year, three artists are selected for the program which includes:

  • A free university-style studio at GCCA
  • Mentorship from another local artist
  • Complimentary classes and workshops at GCCA
  • Presentation of an ARTalk lecture
  • Participation in an exhibition in August-September
  • Opportunities for networking, collaboration, and participation in other local arts events
  • A visit to a local or regional museum of interest
  • Broad exposure as an artist in Greenville and beyond

What is the Brandon Fellowship?

The two founders of the Brandon Fellowship have a deeply felt motivation for initiating this opportunity for young artists. They consider themselves fortunate in being beneficiaries of The Rhodes Scholarship.  The founders explain, "The Scholarship provided us with a great education and welcomed us into a community that challenged us to explore and reach farther than we could have otherwise. We made new friends from all walks of life, friendships that continue to broaden our perspectives and enrich our lives over thirty years later.” This is exactly what they hope the Brandon Fellowships will do for young artists in our community, that they will reap the benefits and share them with those around them, and with those who will come after them.

2015 was the Brandon Fellowship program's inaugural year; the launch coincided with the opening of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts in Greenville, SC. The program supports the Center's mission to be inclusive and serve the whole community with exhibits from local and regional artists, high caliber art classes and workshops and onsite artists' studios.


How to Apply

The application is open June 4-9, 2020. Click here to read the full list of criteria for eligibility and more details on how to apply.

GCCA names Kim Fabian its new executive director

Kim Fabian has been named executive director of the Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA) following an extensive local and national search. Fabian brings more than 25 years of experience driving operational excellence, strengthening brand awareness, and strategically engaging boards and teams for success. Fabian comes to GCCA from Junior Achievement of Central Maryland (JA), where she served as senior vice president since 2012. Fabian received a bachelor's in mass communication from Towson University, where she serves as an officer on the foundation board of directors and is a president emeritus of the alumni association board of directors. GCCA Board Chair Pat Kilburg said, “We are excited to have Kim join the GCCA as we prepare for the launch of the renovation of the Historic Cotton Warehouse and the significant expansion of programs. Her passion for the arts, organizational and business acumen, and love of Greenville will lead us into our next five years and beyond.” Since GCCA opened in 2015, the founders and board of directors of Greenville Center for Creative Arts have made significant progress toward ensuring that a permanent home for the arts is realized in Greenville. In late 2019, GCCA finalized the purchase of the Cloth Building which currently houses all of GCCA’s programs and the Historic Cotton Warehouse, which will be renovated to expand GCCA’s programs in the future. The GCCA Art School has attracted more than 2,300 students for classes and workshops, hundreds of scholarships have enabled students of all ages and income levels to participate in summer camps and classes, and three Brandon Fellows have been selected each year to develop their work as studio artists while pursuing careers in the arts. “It is a privilege to join GCCA in its fifth anniversary year which marks a milestone and celebration for this dynamic studio, classroom, and exhibition space,” Fabian said. "GCCA has become one of upstate South Carolina’s premier destinations for promotion and education of the visual arts and I am honored to play a part in its expansion.” Plans for a significant expansion of GCCA includes renovation of the Historic Cotton Warehouse after years of strategic and deliberate planning by the board of directors. The renovation of the Historic Cotton Warehouse will expand GCCA’s programming by offering classroom studios in three-dimensional mediums. “I am inspired by all that has been achieved by this dedicated group of artists, educators, and community leaders who have brought their vision to life,” said Fabian. “I look forward to taking this vision to the next level and ensuring that GCCA expands its capacity to create an accessible, inclusive place where artists of all ages can thrive.”


Greenville Center for the Creative Arts is located at 101 Abney Street, Greenville. For more information, call 864.735.3948, visit www.artcentergreenville.org, or email info@artcentergreenville.org.

Greenville writer wins NEA fellowship

More #SCartists good news before the weekend


Thursday, the National Endowment for the Arts announced a total of $1.2 million in fellowships to creative writers and translators, supporting both the development of new works of American literature and the translation into English of literary prose, poetry, and drama from writers around the world. “The National Endowment for the Arts is proud to support our nation’s writers and translators and their efforts to expand our literary landscape through their artistry, creativity, and dedication,” said Mary Anne Carter, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. Recently, the National Endowment for the Arts also announced the first round of FY 2020 grants for arts projects, which included 53 grants totaling $1,150,000 for literary publishing projects. Click here for The Hub's coverage and here for the NEA's announcement

Creative Writing Fellowships

Jodi Tevis headshotThe National Endowment for the Arts will award 36 Creative Writing Fellowships of $25,000 each, for a total of $900,000. Fellowships alternate each year between poetry and prose and this year’s fellowships are to support prose—works of fiction and creative nonfiction, such as memoirs and personal essays. The Arts Endowment received nearly 1,700 eligible applications, which were reviewed anonymously by a panel solely on the artistic excellence of the writing sample submitted. These fellowships allow recipients to set aside time for writing, research, travel, and general career advancement. Among them is Greenville writer Dr. Joni Tevis (right), an assistant professor of English at Furman University. Her bio on the Furman website says she is a creative writer with research interests in the essay, environmental writing, and atomic literature. Her first book of nonfiction, The Wet Collection, was published by Milkweed Editions. Since 1967, the National Endowment for the Arts has awarded more than 3,500 Creative Writing Fellowships totaling over $55 million. Many recipients have gone on to receive the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry and Fiction, such as Anthony Doerr, Louise Erdrich, Tyehimba Jess, Jennifer Egan, and Juan Felipe Herrera.

Literature Translation Fellowships

In fiscal year 2020, the National Endowment for the Arts will award 24 Literature Translation Fellowships of $12,500 each, for a total of $300,000. These fellowships will support the English translation of works from 19 countries including Brazil, Egypt, and Japan. Most of these fellowships are to translate works of award-winning and bestselling authors, many of whom have not yet been represented in English. Supported projects include a translation by Bill Johnston of the first two books in the novel cycle Nights and Days by Polish writer Maria Dąbrowska and a translation by Nancy Naomi Carlson of two poetry collections by Congolese author Alain Mabanckou. Since 1981, the Arts Endowment has awarded 504 fellowships to 445 translators, with translations representing 70 languages and 86 countries. Past recipients include Natasha Wimmer, whose fellowship supported her translation of Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, and Jennifer Croft, whose fellowship supported her translation of Nobel Prize-winner Olga Tokarczuk’s Flights. Visit the Arts Endowment’s Literature Fellowships webpage to read excerpts by and features on past Creative Writing Fellows and Literature Translation Fellows.

About the National Endowment for the Arts

Established by Congress in 1965, the National Endowment for the Arts is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the Arts Endowment supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. Visit arts.gov to learn more.

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Chicora Voices seeks executive director

(Ed. note: An application deadline was not provided.)


The executive director position is the key management leader of Chicora Voices' operations and strategic execution. He/she is responsible for overseeing fundraising efforts, community outreach and marketing, and organizational administration. This role reports to the Chicora Voices' Board of Directors.

Roles and Responsibilities

Chicora Voices Executive Director is responsible for several core functions. They include the following: Financial Performance - Fundraising (40%) The Executive Director develops resources sufficient to ensure the financial health of the organization through fundraising efforts. He/she helps identify and cultivate prospective donors, ensures that a fundraising committee has adequate resources and support, leads any available grant writing, asks for contributions, and thanks donors for contributing. Organizational Operations (35%) The Executive Director oversees and executes all required administrative tasks, including but not limited to recruiting new members and maintaining the membership database, creating and disseminating all internal communications, managing the scholarship program, and overseeing the financial ledgers. Community Outreach and Marketing (20%) The Executive Director is the face of Chicora Voices throughout the community, presenting information about the organization when needed. He/she works with all social media outlets to promote the Chicora Voices image and community recognition, creates external marketing materials, and uses available marketing funds to promote Chicora Voices events and auditions with local publications. Board of Directors Responsibilities (5%) The Executive Director reports directly to the Chicora Voices Board of Directors. He/she is responsible for supporting the organization’s mission as set by the board, as well as communicating effectively, providing all information necessary for the board to function properly and make informed decisions.

Requirements

Applicants are required to have:
  • Bachelor’s Degree
  • Knowledge of fundraising strategies, specific to non-profit and arts organizations
  • Ability to work independently, as well as engage volunteer and donor groups
  • Strong written communication, oral communication, and presentation skills
Applicants are preferred to have:
  • Previous experience in choral music or the arts, ideally on a Board of Directors
  • Three or more years of non-profit management experience
Physical Requirements:
  • Ability to lift 25 pounds
  • Ability to work an average of 20 hours per week

Compensation

The current salary range offered to this position is between $15,000-$25,000 based on level of experience and demonstration of skills. Please note: the Executive Director is ultimately responsible for supporting his/her own compensation based on fundraising and operations success, and the amount can be adjusted at the discretion of the Board of Directors based on execution of tasks and overall budget growth.

How to Apply

Interested and qualified candidates should submit a letter of introduction and their resume to info@chicoravoices.org. Chicora Voices is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

Chicora Voices’ Mission Statement

The mission of Chicora Voices is to provide a premier choral experience for young people of Greenville and the surrounding communities. These are our goals as we work to accomplish our mission:
  • Provide high quality musical training in the choral setting that promotes music literacy and healthy singing habits
  • Achieve artistic excellence in musical performances
  • Develop self-discipline in an environment promoting mutual respect
  • Promote a lifelong appreciation and enjoyment of choral music
  • Provide need-based scholarships to deserving students

Young artists invited to apply now for S.C.’s tuition-free arts school

S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities accepting applications for 2020/2021

S.C. Governors School for the Arts Humanities students
The SC Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities, a public, residential high school for artistically talented students, is now accepting applications for the 2020/2021 school year and summer programs. All South Carolina residents in grades 6-11 are eligible to apply online at SCGSAH.org. Located in downtown Greenville, the Governor’s School offers pre-professional training in creative writing, dance, drama, music, and visual arts. Students attend from all over the state to learn from established, practicing artists in an environment that provides the resources needed to hone their artistic abilities including specialized arts studios, state-of-the-art performance halls, a world-class library and dedicated rehearsal spaces. In the tuition-free Residential High School program, students explore and refine their talents in a one-of-a-kind, master-apprentice community while receiving a high school education that has been nationally recognized by U.S. News and World Report, The Washington Post, The Daily Beast and Niche. The Palmetto Gold award-winning high school ranked third in the state for SAT and ACT scores and had a 100 percent graduation and college acceptance rate for the 2018/2019 school year. The reviews and rankings site, Niche.com, ranked the Governor’s School the third “Best College Prep High School” and the fourth “Best Public High School” in South Carolina. Students who are interested in the Governor’s School’s Residential High School program apply in the 10th grade to attend during their junior and senior years. The dance and music programs also accept exceptional sophomores. While tuition is free, there is a meal plan fee, and financial assistance is available for eligible students. The Governor’s School also offers three summer programs that provide younger students the opportunity to immerse themselves in their artistic passion while learning from practicing artists. These include Arts Odyssey, for rising 8th and 9th-grade students; Academy, for rising 10th-grade students; and Summer Dance, for rising 7th-12th grade students. Students can apply online at www.SCGSAH.org for all programs. The application deadline for the Residential High School, Academy, and Summer Dance programs is Jan. 8, 2020. All applications submitted by Nov. 30, 2019, will receive an application fee waiver. For the Arts Odyssey program, the deadline is Dec. 13, 2019. On Saturday, Nov. 2, the Governor’s School is hosting FIRST LOOK, an open house event for prospective students and families who are interested in attending the school’s programs. Guests will have the opportunity to learn about everything the Governor's School has to offer through tours, information sessions, and art area demonstrations. This event is designed for students and families who have not yet visited campus. Check-in begins at 11:30 a.m., and sessions begin at noon. Learn more and register at https://www.scgsah.org/firstlook.

About SC Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities

Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in the areas of creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in a master-apprentice community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th-grade students, and SCGSAH serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. SCGSAH.org

‘Govies’ celebrate school’s landmark birthday

S.C. Governor's School for the Arts & Humanities turns 20


The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) is celebrating the 20th anniversary of the opening of its public residential high school for the arts in Greenville. To kick off a year of celebrations, the school recently held a Founder’s Day Convocation honoring founder and first president Virginia Uldrick (right), a legend across the state for her work in arts education. Uldrick established the Governor’s School’s one-of-a-kind residential high school in 1999, after 10 years of working with legislators, generating support and fundraising to realize her dream: a tuition-free high school that provides pre-professional arts training and a nationally recognized academic education to South Carolina’s artistically talented students. “Her vision was one that we now know to be a model for public education, where the excellence in the arts and academics that she envisioned ultimately places each of our students among the most successful young professionals in the arts and all professions throughout our state and across the nation,” said Governor’s School President Cedric Adderley. He added, “Had it not been for her persistent pursuit of excellence and her vision, so many people would have never had the opportunity to pursue their passion in the arts or pursue the level of a quality education that they so much deserve.”

A firm foundation for arts education, bolstered by then-Governor Riley

Prior to the Governor’s School’s residential high school program, Uldrick established a five-week summer program under the school’s former name, the South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts. This program was signed into legislation in 1980 by the state’s governor at the time, Richard W. Riley, who later became the longest-serving U.S. Secretary of Education. As the keynote speaker of the school’s Founder’s Day Convocation, Riley stated that Uldrick “was an enormous force for good in South Carolina and this country.” He also said, “I’m so proud of the success of the wonderful Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities,” and encouraged students to “pause a few minutes and think about this unique opportunity that the state of South Carolina is providing for you. Think about the wonderful leadership and talented faculty making possible your quality education and talent.”

Alumni impact arts education across South Carolina

Many Governor’s School alumni are continuing Uldrick’s legacy by giving back to younger generations through arts advocacy and education. Some of those alums are now educators in South Carolina. Among them are Jim LeBlanc, class of 2003, who is the principal of Saluda River Academy for the Arts; Andre North, class of 2005, who is the Director of Bands at Hanahan Middle School and assistant director of bands at Hanahan High School; Brooke Falk Permenter, class of 2002, who serves on the faculty at the College of Charleston Honors College; John Ott, class of 2009, who is a gifted and talented teacher in the Orangeburg Consolidated School District; and Stephanie Cureton, class of 2007, who is the director of English Theatre Arts in Greenville.

Alumni have gained national success in the arts and beyond

Many alumni have made names for themselves in their profession on a national scale, thanks to the elevated level of arts training that Uldrick set the groundwork for and remains the Governor’s School’s standard today. Graduates who are bringing acclaim to South Carolina include Patina Miller, a Tony Award-winning actress from Pageland who has held major roles in television series, films, and on Broadway; Rachel Inman, from Greenville, who is the UX Design Lead for Google Maps; Jonathan Spigner, also from Greenville, is a lead dancer in the Hong Kong Ballet; Jedd Rosche, from Beaufort, is the senior congress editor for CNN Politics; and Maria Fabrizio, from Columbia, whose Wordless News illustrations have been commissioned or published by NPR.com, O Magazine, and the New York Times. While the Governor’s School honors Uldrick and reflects on how her fierce determination has made a life-changing impact on thousands of students’ lives, the school happily anticipates what’s to come. “As we celebrate our first 20 years, we look forward to the next 20 years and the continued impact this school will have on young artists in South Carolina as they pursue their dreams,” said Chad Prosser, Governor’s School board chair, during the convocation.

More 20th anniversary events statewide

A student showcase will be hosted in Hilton Head on Nov. 7, 2019 and a celebratory reception will be held in Spartanburg on Dec. 5. In the spring, special events include an anniversary reception in Columbia on March 4, 2020, and a student and alumni showcase at the Peace Center in Greenville on April 7, 2020. Find out more about these upcoming events at https://www.scgsah.org/calendar/events.

About S.C. Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities

Located in Greenville, the South Carolina Governor's School for the Arts and Humanities (SCGSAH) cultivates young artists from across the state through pre-professional training in the areas of creative writing, dance, drama, music and visual arts. In the public, residential high school, students refine their talents in a master-apprentice community while receiving a nationally recognized academic education. Summer programs are available to rising 7th-12th grade students, and SCGSAH serves as a resource to all teachers and students in South Carolina, offering comprehensive outreach programs designed to bring together artists, educators, community organizations and schools. Visit SCGSAH.org for more information.

GCCA announces 2019/2020 Brandon Fellows

Fellowship launches artistic careers, promotes diversity


Greenville Center for Creative Arts announced the three 2019/2020 Brandon Fellows last week.
  • Nick Burns (above, left) is an up-and-coming visual artist and a Greenville native. He began his artistic journey as a performing artist at age 5 and has been teaching dance in the upstate for 13 years. In high school he started out as a street artist, drawing caricatures and custom graffiti art at farmers markets and city events. After years of training in graffiti he began creating murals for homes, businesses and communities and now has over 40 commissioned works in South Carolina. Nick is now as a visual arts educator at West Greenville school and plans to increase in artistic abilities to better serve the community and help make visual arts more attainable to less fortunate people.
  • Julius Ferguson (above, center) is a self-taught artist from Greenville. He’s not only a painter but also a storyteller who hopes to inspire others. Julius takes his life experiences and messages that he feels come from God and puts them in his paintings. Julius has been painting since 2015 and hopes to be able to for as long as his energy is needed in this world. He hopes that he can inspire the community and the world one day with his paintings that tell stories.
  • Jaz Henderson (above, right) is a native of Greer and a graduate of Claflin University where he earned a bachelor's in digital design. His dad is an artist as well, so it can be said that art runs in the family and has therefore played a major part in his life. Jaz has always dreamed about being more involved in the arts around his city and of meeting other artists as well. When he found out that he was selected into the Brandon Fellowship, he knew this was a great opportunity for him to showcase his artwork and continue his career as an artist.

About the Brandon Fellowship

The Brandon Fellowship is a 12-month program that aims to develop three emerging artists between the age of 21-30 by providing a supportive environment, mentoring, and art education. The three main goals of the Brandon Fellowship are:

  • to help young artists launch their art career in our community or prepare for formal arts studies

  • to foster a sense of community

  • to promote diversity at GCCA

Each fellow gets an university style studio space at GCCA. Brandon Fellows must spend a minimum of 25 hours per week in the studio. They also benefit from two $250 stipends for art supplies per fellowship period. They also get:

  • dedicated tutors, assigned based on interest and medium, who will guide them during their residency,

  • access to one 6-week class per Art School session,

  • support and mentoring from neighboring studio artists at the art center,

  • to participate in group exhibitions and community events,

  • and to participate in alumni events.

Learn more about the program by going here.

Peace Center reveals Wyche Pavilion plan revisions

Vibrant new (old) space for music, entertainment

[caption id="attachment_40604" align="aligncenter" width="600"]Artist rendering of the renovated Wyche Pavilion. Artist rendering of the renovated Wyche Pavilion.[/caption]
The Peace Center is announcing revisions to its plans for restoration of the Wyche Pavilion and will return to the City of Greenville’s Design Review Board on July 9. The July 9 meeting follows a public hearing in February, where the Design Review Board provided feedback on the proposed project. Based on those recommendations and further meetings with members of the city and Design Review Board, the design was updated to make the expansion more subordinate to the existing Wyche Pavilion, while preserving the elements required to transform the Wyche into a fully functioning music and entertainment venue. The design by Summerour and Associates retains, preserves and emphasizes the 3,578 square foot iconic shell of the Wyche Pavilion. The addition of custom-made windows and doors, wood floors and ceilings, fans, architectural lighting and HVAC will allow for year-round use. The Wyche will be outfitted as a fully functioning performance venue, featuring state-of-the-art sound and lighting equipment. The open floor plan allows for a variety of performance configurations, from cabaret to concert-style seating, to standing room only club space. The full footprint of the original building (circa 1835) which is much larger than the existing Wyche Pavilion will be utilized for an addition to house the infrastructure required to support the venue. This new structure includes a grand glass entryway, a Green Room for artists, restrooms, storage and equipment rooms, and a catering kitchen. Special features of this project include a large outdoor deck connecting to a walkway which cantilevers from the Wyche along the river, and a large gathering space facing Main Street, all of which may be enjoyed by the public on a regular basis. The landscaping, by Earth Design, will feature lush, environmentally friendly plantings carefully chosen to evolve with each season. Peace Center Board Chairman and CEO of United Community Bank Lynn Harton said “As the Peace Center’s vision has evolved, activity on the campus has expanded as well. In addition to the wonderful Broadway shows and concerts showcased in the Peace Concert Hall, there is continuous activity throughout the campus. The Peace Center hosts songwriters, local performing artists, summer camps, a poetry program for students and adults, music education salons, film, student jazz performances and much more. The board of the Peace Center is excited to see the iconic Wyche Pavilion restored and expanded to become another outstanding performance venue that will benefit the entire community.” The Wyche restoration is the first phase of the Peace Center’s larger master plan, which includes renovation of the Roe Coach Factory and two buildings located on Main Street: the Markley and the Gullick.

About the Peace Center

The Peace Center is a nationally recognized artistic and cultural destination located in Greenville. Situated along the Reedy River in the heart of downtown, its multifaceted, six-acre campus is the region’s center for art, culture, entertainment and engagement. From programs featuring world-class artists in music, theater, and dance to intimate musical performances, to enriching educational experiences and everyday encounters with the arts, the Peace Center hosts hundreds of events every year and welcomes thousands of guests to its riverfront campus every day.