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All you need to know about S.C. Arts Awards Day

14 recipients to be honored May 1

  • Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts, Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award presented at ceremony
  • S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon & Art Sale to follow

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Two awards honoring high arts achievement in South Carolina will be presented to 14 recipients Wednesday, May 1, 2019 during South Carolina Arts Awards festivities at the UofSC Alumni Center in Columbia. The South Carolina Arts Awards, sponsored by Colonial Life, are a joint presentation of the South Carolina Arts Commission, South Carolina Arts Foundation, and McKissick Museum at the University of South Carolina to award the Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts and Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards.

Awards Ceremony

Both awards will be presented at the awards ceremony at the UofSC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia), which begins with a reception from 10-10:45 a.m. The official ceremony begins at 11 a.m. S.C. Arts Commission Board Chairman Henry Horowitz and Executive Director Ken May will be joined by South Carolina First Lady Peggy McMaster to present the awards to each recipient. Nine recipients from their respective categories are being recognized with Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Awards for the Arts for outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina:
  • ARTIST: Tyrone Geter, Elgin
  • INDIVIDUAL: Kathleen Bateson, Hilton Head Island
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION (Individual): Simeon A. Warren, Charleston
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION (Organization): South Carolina African American Heritage Commission, Hartsville
  • BUSINESS: Hampton III Gallery, Taylors
  • GOVERNMENT: Florence County Museum, Florence
  • ORGANIZATION: The Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston
  • ORGANIZATION (Special Award): Town Theatre, Columbia
  • LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT: Cecil Williams, Orangeburg
Four artists and one advocate are being recognized with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award as practitioners and advocates of traditional arts significant to communities throughout the state. Their traditions embody folklife’s dynamic, multigenerational nature, and its fusion of artistic and utilitarian ideals. They are:
  • John Andrew “Andy” Brooks (Liberty): Old-Time Music
  • Dorothy Brown Glover (Lincolnville): Quilting
  • Julian A. Prosser (Columbia): Bluegrass Music
  • The Voices of Gullah Singers (St. Helena Island): Gullah Singing
  • Dale Rosengarten, Ph.D. (McClellanville): Advocacy, African-American Lowcountry Basketry & Southern Jewish Heritage
McKissick Museum will celebrate this year’s Folk Heritage Award recipients at a mixer Tuesday, April 30 from 6-8 p.m., at the Blue Moon Ballroom (554 Meeting St, West Columbia). Admission is free for McKissick members or $5 for non-members. RSVP’s can be made, or tickets purchased, by going here. For more information, or to RSVP or purchase a ticket over the phone, call 803.777.2876.

S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon & Art Sale

The S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients afterward during a fundraising luncheon at the UofSC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia). Works by South Carolina will be on sale from 11 a.m. to noon, with proceeds supporting S.C. Arts Commission programs. The luncheon program is expected to run from 12:30 to 2 p.m.
  • Unique ikebana flower arrangements, in partnership with Ikebana International Chapter #182 of Columbia, will serve as table centerpieces. Each arrangement, available for sale, will be presented in an included, original vase crafted by a South Carolina artisan.
  • Art experiences will also be sold.
  • The keynote speaker will be S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May, retiring at the end of June 2019 after 33 years at the agency and the past nine as its leader, giving a “State of the Arts” message.
  • Luncheon tickets are $50 per person and available for purchase through SouthCarolinaArts.com or by calling 803.734.8696.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

S.C. Arts Awards: The Gibbes Museum of Art

2019 Recipient Feature Series

As the day nears for the 2019 South Carolina Arts Awards, The Hub is taking 15 days to focus on this year's recipients: nine receiving the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts and five receiving the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award, which are managed jointly by the South Carolina Arts Commission and McKissick Museum at UofSC. In between the two groups, we'll run a special feature on S.C. Arts Awards sponsor Colonial Life.

The Gibbes Museum of Art

Organization Category Since its construction in 1905, the Gibbes has been a center of creativity for the visual arts in the South. It generates scholarship, exhibitions, and programs that promote a deep understanding of the diverse Lowcountry region and provides context for its role in American and world culture. The mission of the Gibbes is to enhance lives through art by engaging people of every background and experience with art and artists of enduring quality, by collecting and preserving art that touches Charleston, and by providing opportunities to learn, discover, enjoy, and be inspired by the creative process. A 2017 Economic Impact Study has concluded that the Gibbes is a "driving force in the community" with a calculated 120 million dollar impact on the tourist economy through the 60,000 visitors it attracts and the jobs it creates. In spring 2016 the Gibbes reopened after a 17 million dollar capital project that restored and renovated its original Beaux Arts building, which is the oldest art museum facility in the South. Today visitors begin their artistic discovery through free access to the ground floor public education center with state-of-the art lecture, performance, and studio spaces that open directly into the Lenhardt Garden, where numerous private and corporate rental events take place. Nine splendid galleries greet visitors on the second and third floors where world-renowned American artists spanning 300 years of art history are showcased, including the Mary Jackson Modern and Contemporary Gallery named after the renowned American sweetgrass basket maker, whose work is permanently on display. Regularly changing special exhibitions attract audiences from around the world. The Gibbes renovation has received accolades from all sectors including the South Carolina Department of Archives and History, the Preservation Society of Charleston, and Historic Charleston Foundation. The Gibbes houses an exceptional painting and works on paper collection that spans from the Colonial period through the present, the most comprehensive collection of objects from the Charleston Renaissance period (1915-1940), and the third largest collection of miniature portraits in the country. It lends more than 50 objects per year to renowned art institutions such as the Guggenheim Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, MoMA, and Art Institute of Chicago; serves as an image resource to publishing houses, businesses, and scholars; participates in the Google Art & History initiative; and offers thousands of objects from the collection for online research. Its many exhibition publications featuring original research have garnered numerous awards and have changed the way Charleston and the South are viewed in the history of American art. Dynamic year-round programming engages and supports the needs of the region’s innovators and creative community. It continually develops new, multi-dimensional education and outreach programs—more than 100 per year— to expand the museum experience while addressing the interests of an increasingly diverse audience. As part of a 10-Year Strategic Plan launched in 2018, the Gibbes has set forth goals to offer transformational exhibitions exploring the themes of social justice; innovation; health and wellness; and conservation and the environment. In addition, the creation the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art in 2008 strengthens its focus on contemporary artists by awarding $10,000 to a living artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Visit GibbesMuseum.org to learn more.
South Carolina Arts Awards Day is Wednesday, May 1, 2019. The festivities begin at 10 a.m. with a reception that leads up to the awards ceremony at the UofSC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia). The event is free and open to the public. Following the ceremony, the South Carolina Arts Foundation honors the recipients and the arts community at the S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon and Art Sale. Tickets are $50. Please go here for more information and reservations.

2019 Verner Award to honor nine South Carolinians

State's highest arts honor recognizes outstanding achievement and contributions

Awards to be presented May 1 at S.C. Arts Awards


COLUMBIA, S.C. – Nine South Carolinians are to be honored by the South Carolina Arts Commission with the 2019 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Governor’s Award for the Arts—the state’s highest arts honor. The following recipients from their respective categories are being recognized for outstanding achievement and contributions to the arts in South Carolina:
  • LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT:  Cecil Williams, Orangeburg
  • ARTIST:  Tyrone Geter, Columbia
  • INDIVIDUAL:  Kathleen (Kathi) P. Bateson, Hilton Head Island
  • ARTS IN EDUCATION: Simeon Warren, Charleston (Individual) S.C. African American Heritage Commission, Hartsville (Organization)
  • BUSINESS:  Hampton III Gallery, Taylors
  • GOVERNMENT:  Florence County Museum, Florence
  • ORGANIZATION: Gibbes Museum of Art, Charleston Columbia Stage Society (Town Theatre), Columbia (Special Award)
Print and web images of recipients available here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/plf40ffa55oxh5g/AAAksiSWeKNQxxytp5yBM8DQa?dl=0 “It is an honor and privilege to recognize individuals and organizations who live out the service, commitment and passion that help the arts thrive in South Carolina,” S.C. Arts Commission Chairman Henry Horowitz said. “Each of the Verner Award recipients makes a tremendous contribution not just locally, but they are honored for broad impact on the state’s arts community and beyond. These are outstanding ambassadors for our state." A diverse committee, appointed by the S.C. Arts Commission Board of Directors and drawn from members of the South Carolina community at large, reviews all nominations and, after a rigorous process, makes recommendations to the board for final approval after a series of panel meetings produces a recommendation from each category. The 2019 Verner Awards will be presented with the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards at South Carolina Arts Awards sponsored by Colonial Life on Wednesday, May 1 in a morning ceremony at the USC Alumni Center (900 Senate St., Columbia). The S.C. Arts Foundation will honor the recipients afterward during a fundraising luncheon. South Carolina artists’ work will be on sale to support the programs of the S.C. Arts Commission. Luncheon tickets are $50 per person and are to be available for purchase by mid-March. For more about the Verner Awards or the S.C. Arts Awards Luncheon, call 803.734.8696 or visit SouthCarolinaArts.com.

About the Verner Award Recipients

Cecil Williams (Lifetime Achievement), an Orangeburg native, is a professional photographer, videographer, publisher, inventor, author, and architect best known for his photographic documentation of the struggle to achieve freedom, justice, and equality during the Civil Rights struggle. By the age of 9, he had already begun his career in photography and by 15 was working professionally as a freelancer for such publications as JET and the Afro-American, and as an Associated Press stringer. The teenaged Williams documented segregated life in the Jim Crow era and the Clarendon movement that led to Briggs v. Elliott in the 1950s, countless protests and then desegregation at Clemson University and the University of South Carolina and was there for the Orangeburg Massacre in 1968. Williams, who received an art degree from Claflin University, owns Cecil Williams Photography, LLC and was recently appointed by Claflin as its historic preservationist. Williams is also recipient of the Order of the Palmetto, the state’s highest award to an individual, and Governor’s Award in the Humanities from SC Humanities. In a career that spreads across continents, Tyrone Geter (Artist Category) has built an international reputation as a world-class artist, painter, sculptor, illustrator, and teacher. Recently retired associate professor of art at Benedict College in Columbia, Geter received his Master of Fine Arts from Ohio University in 1978 with an emphasis on painting and drawing. In 1979, he relocated to Africa, living, drawing, and painting among the Fulani and local peoples of Northern Nigeria, “a lesson in the creative process that no art school would ever teach me.” Since, he has illustrated 30 children’s books, exhibited on four continents, and after relocating to South Carolina, until recently taught painting and drawing at Benedict and curated its Ponder Fine Arts Gallery. Kathleen P. Bateson (Individual Category) is president/CEO and executive producer of the Arts Center of Coastal Carolina – a past Verner Award recipient in the organization category. She is past president of the S.C. Arts Alliance board, served as chair and founding co-chair of the Arts & Cultural Council of Hilton Head; and was a founding member and is chair of the Community Foundation of the Lowcountry’s Women in Philanthropy. Bateson is founder and president of Management for the Arts, a national firm specializing in NPO organizational restructure, institutional planning, strategic positioning and new business ventures. She has served as a cultural representative on international delegations to South Africa, China and Japan, and is herself a goldsmith and professional set designer. Simeon A. Warren (Arts in Education Individual Category) is a cathedral-trained stone carver, sculptor, and conservator. He holds a degree from the Glasgow (Scotland) School of the Arts, and his career has led to stone work at or on some of England’s major cathedrals (and even Buckingham Palace). In 2001 he emigrated to Charleston, where he was a founding faculty member at what became the American College of Building Arts in 2004. He developed college-level courses for professors, delivered the college’s licenses to recruit and to teach, hired the college’s faculty, and served as dean from 2006 to 2013. Warren owns a private architectural stone practice and is developing The Stone People Project, among other public art projects. The S.C. African American Heritage Commission (Arts in Education Organization Category) identifies and promotes the preservation of historic sites, structures, buildings, and culture of the African American experience in South Carolina, and assists and enhances the efforts of the S.C. Department of Archives and History. SCAAHC is a leader in integrating the arts into education resources, publishing the “Supplement to the Teacher’s Guide Integrating Art into Classroom Instruction” in 2016 and a subsequent revision last year. Since 1970, Hampton III Gallery (Business Category) has supported professional living artists and the estates of professional artists in or from South Carolina ranging from post WWII to the present. Hampton III Gallery’s vision of supporting artists and educating the public to the rich heritage of South Carolina artists continues into 2019. South Carolina’s oldest gallery has more than 500 paintings, sculptures and original prints in inventory. Changing exhibitions, artists’ talks, and special events provide educational opportunities for all. Consultation is available for private and corporate collections. Exhibitions change every 6-8 weeks. The public is invited to all events. The Florence County Museum (FCM) (Government Category) reflects the region’s rich artistic, cultural and historic heritage. Its permanent collection currently includes eight works by celebrated 20th century African American artist and Florence native, William H. Johnson and it is home to The Wright Collection of Southern Art, a volume of over 140 works representing some of the finest in 20th century Southern art (including some by Elizabeth O’Neill Verner). The FCM provides a platform for contemporary artists as host of the Pee Dee Regional Art Competition, South Carolina’s oldest juried art competition, since 1954. Since 1905, the Gibbes Museum of Art (Organization Category) has been a center for creativity for the visual arts. It provides more than 100 educational programs and events. Nine galleries spanning 300 years of art history are showcased to 60,000 visitors a year who discover, enjoy, and are inspired by the creative process. The museum loans 50 objects a year to the major U.S. art museums. Dynamic year-round programming engages, and the Gibbes continually develops new multi-dimensional education and outreach programs that expand the museum experience while offering exhibitions that stay relevant to current topics. Celebrating its 100th season in 2018/2019, Columbia Stage Society’s Town Theatre (Organization Category Special Award) provides quality, live, family-oriented community theatre and entry-level experience for those who wish to participate on or off stage. Every performance has open auditions, with all community members being encouraged to attend. On stage, Town Theatre’s current and alumni performers have appeared on Broadway, network television and in major feature films. Off stage, ample opportunity exists for community members to get involved as costumers, as set and backstage crew, by helping in the box office, or as ushers and house managers.

About the South Carolina Arts Commission

With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of our state’s cultures and forms of expression, the South Carolina Arts Commission pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. Created by the South Carolina General Assembly in 1967, the Arts Commission works to increase public participation in the arts by providing services, grants, and leadership initiatives in three areas:
  • arts education,
  • community arts development,
  • and artist development.
Headquartered in Columbia, S.C., the Arts Commission is funded by the state of South Carolina, by the federal government through the National Endowment for the Arts and other sources. For more information, visit SouthCarolinaArts.com or call 803.734.8696.

Tuning Up: 1858 Prize and forum tomorrow + SEPF 2019 lineup

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Collaborative first steps. Tomorrow is a big night at the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston. Dr. Leo Twiggs is set to receive the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. The pride of Orangeburg is the first S.C. artist (ahem, #SCartists) to receive the $10,000 prize. But you knew all that. What you might not know is that afterward is the Amy P. Coy Forum and 1858 Prize Party (6-8 p.m., 135 Meeting St., Charleston) at which representatives from ArtFields, South Arts, and the Gibbes will use the forum to discuss collaboration among the Southeast's three biggest arts prizes, which happen to be awarded by those entities. Where will it lead? We don't know, but that's why we're going. See you there? $35. SEPF announces 2019 guest artists. (And there are some, ahem, key names here.) Summertime is music festival time, and every year Columbia is a piano hotspot. The Southeastern Piano Festival is set to return June 16-23, 2019 and last week announced their guest artists. Artistic Director Joseph Rackers promises and incredible week of music. (Take it from The Hub – don't miss Alessio Bax). In addition to performances, accomplished pianists will give masterclasses and it all comes to a head with the Arthur Fraser International Piano Competition on June 21. (The teenage winner performs a concerto with the South Carolina Philharmonic.)

Submitted material

Verner Award recipient Leo Twiggs a finalist for 1858 Prize

The Gibbes Museum of Art and Society 1858 have announced the 2018 short list of finalists for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. The five artists selected for the short list are:

  • María Magdalena Campos-Pons,
  • Stephen Hayes,
  • Birney Imes,
  • Leo Twiggs,
  • and Susan Worsham.
The 1858 Prize, awarded annually with a cash prize of $10,000, acknowledges an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South. Nearly 250 artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia submitted applications to the 2018 competition. The finalists were selected by a distinguished panel of judges including:
  • Bo Bartlett, artist, 2017 winner of the 1858 Prize;
  • Liza Cleveland, Society 1858 board member;
  • Adam Justice, Assistant Curator of Modern & Contemporary Art, The Mint Museum;
  • Anja Kelley, Society 1858 board member;
  • Marshall Price, Nancy Hanks Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Nasher Museum of Art;
  • Pam Wall, Curator of Exhibitions, Gibbes Museum of Art;
  • and Caroline Wright, Independent Curator and Co-founder of look-see.co.
The 1858 Prize winner will be announced by the Gibbes Museum in August.

Tuning Up: Writing workshops for girls + 1858 Prize + Twitter

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Writing workshops for girls.  Big opportunity here for high school girls (grades 9-12) who are serious about honing their sci-fi and fantasy and/or poetry-writing skills: Columbia College is to offer two workshops June 18-22 on its campus, one on each topic. We don't cross-post much, but take a quick peek at Arts Daily for more information. The poetry workshop will be taught by Dr. Ray McManus, who pitched in as one of the judges for the Poetry Out Loud state finals this past March. Good enough for government work. It's not mentioned in the story, but just so you know, an additional $100,000 appropriated to the S.C. Arts Commission's budget by the Senate is among the differences to be reconciled by a General Assembly conference committee next month. While the budget was not sent to Gov. McMaster by the legislators' self-imposed deadline, this story claims a government shutdown is unlikely. The Hub and SCAC, along with other dedicated state employees, are grateful. Follow us. Do you follow us on Twitter? We'd hate to think you'd miss such social media goodness as this (right). Social media, for all its ills, is also one incredible tool. We're hoping to improve our Twitter presence, while (clearly) not taking ourselves too seriously. Last call for 1858! Applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art awarded by our friends at the Gibbes Museum will be accepted through May 31! The 1858 Prize awards $10,000 to an artist whose work contributes to a new understanding of art in the South. Learn more here.

Apply now for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art Call for Entries | January 1 - May 31, 2018 The Gibbes Museum of Art is now accepting applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Sponsored by our young patrons auxiliary group Society 1858, the prize is awarded annually to an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South. Entries for the annual award and $10,000 cash prize can be made exclusively online at 1858prize.org through May 31, 2018. Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia are eligible to apply. Unlike any other award of its type, the 1858 Prize is designed to create an online archive of information about southern artists that is available to curators, collectors, academicians, and the public. The 2017 Prize was awarded to painter Bo Bartlett of Columbus, Georgia. Past winners include mixed-media artist Radcliffe Bailey who will be featured in the upcoming Gibbes exhibition Radcliffe Bailey: Pensive and sculptor Patrick Dougherty who is currently featured in a site-specific installation at the Gibbes entitled Betwixt and Between. For more information on the Prize, please visit 1858prize.org.

Call for entries: 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art

Application deadline: May 31 The Gibbes Museum of Art is accepting applications for the 1858 Prize for Contemporary Southern Art. Sponsored by the young patrons auxiliary group Society 1858, the prize is awarded annually to an artist whose work demonstrates the highest level of artistic achievement in any media, while contributing to a new understanding of art in the South. Entries for the annual award and $10,000 cash prize can be made exclusively online at 1858Prize.org through May 31. Artists from Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia are eligible to apply. The 1858 Prize is designed to create an online archive of information about Southern artists that is available to curators, collectors, academicians, and the public. The 2016 Prize was awarded to mixed media artist Alicia Henry of Nashville, Tennessee. Past winners include photographers Deborah Luster and Stephen Marc and mixed-media artist Sonya Clark, all of whom were featured in the Gibbes 2016 spring exhibition The Things We Carry: Contemporary Art in the South. 2011 winner Patrick Dougherty will debut a site-specific installation at the Gibbes in March 2017. For more information, visit 1858prize.org. Via: Gibbes Museum of Art

Gibbes Museum boosting arts education for Title 1 students

The Gibbes Museum of Art received a $15,000 Arts Education Project grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission to help fund the Arts Access program, which provides free admission to Title 1 schools. gibbesartsaccessFrom WCSC Charleston:

The Gibbes Museum of Art is working to boost arts education in Title 1 schools with a special “Arts Access” program for students. "A lot of them have never been to a museum before so it's important for them to see this space, this community museum that's for them,” Rebecca Sailor, educational curator of the Gibbes Museum of the Arts, said. The Arts Access program allows students in Title 1 schools, which receive extra funding for a high number of kids from low-income families, the opportunity to tour the museum for free. Students also participate in hands-on activities. "My favorite part is learning stuff but at the same time having activities to do,” Hursey Elementary 5th grader Sha,ronn said. "I just love to watch their faces and their expressions and the comments they make quietly to their selves,” Heather Teems, an art teacher, said. The Arts Access program also covers the costs of transportation to the museum. "We wouldn't be able to afford it. The school wouldn't be able to afford the bus, to be able to come that many times.  I don't think these children would come on their own if they hadn’t had a chance to come here,” Teems said. Museum staff coordinate the tours and programming to support teachers in-classroom curriculum. “We work very closely with the teachers to make sure we’re coordinating with their curriculum,” Sailor said. “That’s very important. We’re not doing our thing; we’re doing their thing.” The program is currently funded through the S.C. Arts Commission and Wells Fargo. The town of Kiawah also supports the program for Johns Island students.  Schools from Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester Title 1 schools are eligible for the program. For more information on educational opportunities at the Gibbes, visit here

Gibbes Museum of Art reopens after $13.5 million renovation

From ArtFixDaily.com

The Gibbes Museum of Art reopened its doors to the public May 28 after an extensive two-year, multimillion-dollar renovation. The 111-year-old museum houses a premier collection of more than 10,000 works telling the story of American art. In addition to the museum’s permanent exhibitions, the Gibbes will showcase six to eight special exhibitions per year to promote creativity, introduce new art forms and provide perspective on larger community issues. “When the Gibbes Museum opened in 1905, the nation celebrated what Charleston has always understood: the power of art to inspire our imagination, heal our hurt, and nourish our souls,” said Angela Mack, the museum’s executive director. “The reopening of the Gibbes signifies a renewed connection between the community, art and artists.” The activity-filled first floor of the Gibbes is free and open to the public and features artist studios, classrooms for all ages, a museum store, event space and a café set to open midsummer. Along the Angela D. Mack Promenade, visitors will see artists at work in the resident studio spaces and classes taking place in the hands-on education centers. At the end of the hallway, guests are invited to reflect upon the art and relax in the classically landscaped Lenhardt Garden, part of The Gateway Walk. “The reopening of the Gibbes Museum of Art signifies a new chapter in both the museum’s and City of Charleston’s history,” said Mayor John Tecklenburg. “When the city found the crumpled blueprints years ago, it was clear it would take a special team to restore the museum to its original layout and purpose. The years of renovation have been worth the wait, and we’re proud of the museum’s renewed vision to embrace visitors and the Charleston community like never before.” The newly expanded gallery space on the second and third floors of the museum showcases more than 600 works from the permanent collection, including paintings, sculptures, works on paper, decorative art objects and installations. The permanent collection spans four centuries and provides a dynamic introduction to the visual culture of America and the South from the colonial era to the present. With the first-ever American miniature portraits painted in Charleston in watercolor on thin disks of ivory, the Gibbes is home to one of the most prestigious American portrait miniature collections in the country. In addition to the museum’s permanent collection, the Gibbes reopens with two blockbuster exhibitions available for viewing until October 9, 2016: Beyond Catfish Row: The Art of Porgy and Bess celebrates George Gershwin’s famed opera, as interpreted by visual artists since its creation. The exhibition includes a number of paintings from the 1930s era, including works by American regionalist George Biddle, who illustrated the original Porgy and Bess libretto in 1935. Beyond Catfish Rowalso includes paintings by Gershwin himself and works by American modernist Henry Botkin, who accompanied the composer to Charleston while he wrote the opera. The 1930s works are paired with more recent interpretations by contemporary artists Kara Walker and Jonathan Green. The Things We Carry: Contemporary Art in the South features paintings, sculpture, photography, and mixed media works by a diverse group of nationally known contemporary artists. Together, these artists address the troubled history of the American South and the many ways that history is represented today, including artistic responses to the tragic shooting of nine parishioners at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston on June 17, 2015. The exhibition provides a venue where the Charleston community and visitors alike can come together in the spirit of understanding and unity, inspired by the art on view. The newly renovated museum aims to unite the public with artwork and artists through its collections, events and dynamic ground floor offerings. The Gibbes will remain open until 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday evenings, encouraging visitors to experience the museum in a different light.