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2nd Act Film Project returns Oct. 30 in Columbia

Two screenings at Trustus Theatre


The 2nd Act Film Project, an endeavor of the Jasper Project, will premier its 6th season of short films on October 30 at Trustus Theater in Columbia’s historic Vista. There will be two screenings, at 7 and 9:15 p.m. Tickets are $15-20 and are available via Eventbrite.com. Ten filmmaking teams, selected from an open call for entries, will each debut an original short film having been provided with the 1st and 3rd acts of a screenplay and tasked with writing the 2nd act and creating the film in its entirety. Teams are provided a small stipend to fund their projects. The 2019 2nd Act Film Project teams are led this year by David Axe, Ian O’Briant, Amy Brower, William Woody, Jennifer Baxley, Sean Parsons, Silas Rowland, Henry Coonrod, Taiyen Stevenson, and Daniel Colella. Wade Sellers is the project director. For more information on the 2nd Act Film Project, go to www.secondactfilmafestival.com.

About the 2nd Act Film Project

The 2nd Act Film Project is a unique take on the film project concept. The goal of the 2nd Act Film Project is to promote the growth of independent filmmaking in Columbia and grow the network of independent filmmakers throughout South Carolina. Founded in 2013, the project has already produced 50 films. The 2nd Act Film Project Is presented by the Jasper Project - a non-profit arts organization based in Columbia (www.JasperProject.org).

Doko Film Fest extends deadline for high school filmmakers

Submission deadline: Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019


Doko Film Fest, a competitive showcase event featuring the work of student filmmakers ages 15 to 18, extended the deadline to submit entries for its inaugural event. As we mentioned in October, the festival gives high school aged filmmakers the opportunity to showcase their films to a live audience and have their work judged by industry professionals. From their website:

The Doko Film Fest is about South Carolina high school age film makers stimulating and entertaining a live audience with their visual story telling art. It's a place where the film makers interact with the audience and other film makers to explain their film, and to receive reaction and comment on their work.

The filmmakers and others attending will be able to attend master classes led by professional filmmakers. Categories include: short story, documentary, music video, comedy, animation and pocket studio (made entirely on smart phone). Films should be between five and 10 minutes in length, except for animation which should be between one and three minutes in length and music video which should be no shorter than three minutes. The deadline to submit entries is Thursday, Feb. 7, 2019.

The event

Doko Film Fest takes place April 26-28, 2019 in Blythewood. There will be an opening reception, film screenings, a concert, and a closing awards ceremony. Awards will be handed out in the following categories:
  • Best Short Story
  • Best Documentary
  • Best Music Video
  • Best Comedy
  • Best Animation
  • Best Pocket Studio Production
  • Best Original Music
  • Best Male Actor
  • Best Female Actor
  • Best Director
  • Best Festival Film
Not bad, huh? The Doko Film Fest was created by Ray Smith in partnership with Bravo Blythewood, a non-profit dedicated to the promotion of arts in the area. A leader in the academic world, Ray Smith began his career in the UK in the field of health care. He then moved onto Frankfurt, Germany, developing executive education programs for Deutsche Bank. His work brought him to the U.S., where he was associate dean for executive education at Duke University, a position he later held at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina (USC). While at USC, he designed and developed the concept of the virtual global classroom, using technologies to bring learners and faculty together from anywhere in the world. Today, Ray continues his work in business education at USC and  learning strategies for business leaders through his company, Learning with Leaders, and is executive producer and co-owner of Modos Media, producing documentary films for television. Read more here.  

Tuning Up: Calling all S.C. high school filmmakers

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


Doko Film Fest showcases high school filmmakers. Doko Film Fest, a competitive showcase event featuring the work of student filmmakers ages 15 to 18, announced Monday that entries are officially being accepted for its inaugural event. The festival gives high school aged filmmakers the opportunity to showcase their films to a live audience and have their work judged by industry professionals. The filmmakers and others attending will be able to attend master classes led by professional filmmakers. Categories include: short story, documentary, music video, comedy, animation and pocket studio (made entirely on smart phone). Films should be between five and ten minutes in length, except for animation which should be between one and three minutes in length and music video which should be no shorter than three minutes. The deadline to submit entries is January 7, 2019.

Evergreen (for now): Time is running out!

  • Nominations for the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts (right) are due Thursday, Nov. 8. All it takes to start the process of awarding an artist, arts organization, business or foundation, government entity, individual, or arts educator/institution one of these prestigious awards for significant contributions to the arts in South Carolina is one letter. Don't wait. Find out more now! (Noms for the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards are due at the same time. Here's info on those.)
  • Applications for $5,000 individual artist fellowships are also due Thursday, Nov. 8. Unrestricted awards will honor achievement in visual arts, craft, music composition, and music performance. Don't miss out!

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Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers names Screening Partners

South Arts has announced the 24 Screening Partners participating in the 2018-19 Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers, and will host a convening in Atlanta May 18-19 to curate the upcoming season. Together, the Screening Partner venues will discuss which films and filmmakers to invite on tour to their communities in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The Screening Partners include:

  • a/perture (Winston-Salem, N.C.)
  • Arts Council of Central Louisiana (Alexandria, La.)
  • Broward College (Fort Lauderdale, Fla.)
  • City of Hapeville (Hapeville, Ga.)
  • Clayton Center for the Arts/Maryville College (Maryville, Tenn.)
  • East Tennessee State University/Mary B. Martin School of the Arts (Johnson City, Tenn.)
  • Fuquay-Varina Arts Center (FuquayVarina, N.C.)
  • Georgia Southern University (Statesboro, Ga.)
  • Global Education Center (Nashville, Tenn.)
  • Jacksonville State University (Jacksonville, Ala.)
  • The Jessye Norman School of the Arts, Inc. (Augusta, Ga.)
  • North Central Louisiana Arts Council (Ruston, La.)
  • Ocala Film Foundation (Ocala, Fla.)
  • Oxford College of Emory University (Oxford, Ga.)
  • Presbyterian College (Clinton, S.C.)
  • South Miami-Dade Cultural Arts Center (Cutler Bay, Fla.)
  • Southern Kentucky Performing Arts Center (Bowling Green, Ky.)
  • The Tennessee Valley Art Association (Tuscumbia, Ala.)
  • Tropic Cinema/Key West Film Society (Key West, Fla.)
  • Troy University (Troy, Ala.)
  • Unified Government of Athens-Clarke County, GA-Athens Cultural Affairs Commission (Athens, Ga.)
  • Union College (Barbourville, Ky.)
  • Union County Community Arts Council/Wingate University (Wingate, N.C.)
  • University of Tampa (Tampa, Fla.)
From September through April, each Screening Partner presents six films and filmmakers. Along with a screening of the film, the filmmakers are made available to the local community for workshops and discussions. The filmmakers also conduct a Q&A with audiences following the film screening to discuss the film, their subject, and their work. “Southern Circuit is all about connections and conversations,” explained Teresa Hollingsworth, senior program director with South Arts. “Not only do we want to make sure audiences across the region have access to current and vital independent films, but we provide opportunities to dive into challenging and necessary conversations.” At the convening, the 24 Screening Partners will discuss the slate of films and filmmakers who applied for consideration. They will explore which films would resonate most within their respective communities, and determine the 24 films and filmmakers that will be selected to tour. “The selection process is almost like a fantasy football draft,” laughed Hollingsworth. Films under consideration include feature-length animation, documentary, experimental, and narrative works created by independent filmmakers. Recent tours have included Maya Angelou: And Still I Rise by Bob Hercules and Rita Coburn Whack, Quest by Jonathan Olshefski, 78/52 by Alexandre O. Philippe, and Donald Cried by Kris Avedisian. The selected films and screening dates for the Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers will be announced later this summer, and can be found on each of the Screening Partner website and www.southarts.org. Southern Circuit screenings are funded in part through a partnership with the National Endowment for the Arts.
About South Arts South Arts advances Southern vitality through the arts. The nonprofit regional arts organization was founded in 1975 to build on the South’s unique heritage and enhance the public value of the arts. South Arts’ work responds to the arts environment and cultural trends with a regional perspective. South Arts offers an annual portfolio of activities designed to support the success of artists and arts providers in the South, address the needs of Southern communities through impactful arts-based programs, and celebrate the excellence, innovation, value and power of the arts of the South. For more information, visit www.southarts.org.

Tuning Up: Chills, Thrills, and Kills with ‘Grave Intentions’ + more

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


  • Deadline extension! We first brought this to you in early February, but it's so cool we wanted to bring it back: Filmmakers and screenplay writers are invited to participate in a new project from Death Cat Entertainment – its “Grave Intentions" Anthology.  If your work fits the horror genre (including suspense, thriller, fantasy, sci-fi, supernatural, etc.), go here for more information.
  • An inspiring student from Ninety-Six who attends the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind, an ABC Project school in Greenwood, is "enthralling with her voice" according to the Greenwood Index-Journal.
  • Performing artists, here's a GREAT opportunity for you: apply now to be one of up to 16 groups presented in a juried showcase at South Arts' Performing Arts Exchange conference in Orlando this coming October. Present your best from industry pros from across the Southeast at an annual conference that supports the presentation and touring of performing artists along the east and gulf coasts.
  • ICYMI: this week, the Arts Commission announced the recipients of the 2018 Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts.

Tuning Up: Black History event in Anderson, call for short films, etc.

Good morning! "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


  • Tonight at 6 p.m., the Anderson County Library begins the county's Black History Month celebration with an event highlighting our state's role in the civil rights movement. To wit: did you know Rosa Parks received training in Columbia? More information here. (The event is sponsored by the Arts Commission.)
  • Are you more Halloween than Valentine's Day? An Arts Commission AVI grantee has a "ghoul" project in the works that you'll be "goblin" up. (Okay, we'll stop.) Filmmakers and screenplay writers are invited to help Deathcat Entertainment with "Grave Intentions" – their pun, not ours. Go here for more information.
  • More on films: Indie Grits Festival Director Seth Gadsden chatted Indie Grits Labs on the National Endowment for the Arts' "Art Works" podcast!
  • Call for art! Visual Arts Exchange in Raleigh is calling for art from installation artists. Check out The Cube and The Lab for more. Deadline for both spaces appears to be Feb. 15.
  • And finally... why we advocate: because through public support of the arts, the S.C. Arts Commission was able to award 342 grants totaling $3.3 million in 42 counties in FY 2017. That's 73% of our state funding – more than the legislative mandate of 70%.