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Theatre and literary artists – it’s your turn to apply for fellowships

Application deadline is November 1. The South Carolina Arts Commission is accepting applications for the next round of Individual Artist Fellowships. South Carolina artists working in prose, poetry, acting or playwriting are invited to apply for the 2019 awards. Each fellow receives an unrestricted $5,000 award. Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina’s exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process by out-of-state panelists and are based on artistic excellence only. The awards bring recognition that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. Fellowships are awarded in four disciplines each year. Find complete guidelines and application instructions online. The deadline to apply is Nov. 1, 2017. Related: Who won the most recent round of fellowships?

SC.Fellows exhibition celebrates exceptional artists

SC.Fellows Part I, a retrospective exhibition of the South Carolina Arts Commission's visual arts and craft fellows, is on view in two Columbia locations through Sept. 17.  701 Center for Contemporary Art and the McMaster Gallery at the University of South Carolina School of Visual Art and Design have partnered with the Arts Commission to present this exhibition as part of the S.C. Arts Commission's 50th Anniversary celebration. Several solo and group exhibitions of current and past fellows are being developed around the state. SC.Fellows is drawn from work of the 89 artists who have received fellowships since the program launched in 1976. Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina's exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process and are based on artistic excellence only. “The 50th anniversary of the South Carolina Arts Commission provides an ideal opportunity to survey the breadth and depth of art made in South Carolina,” says New York art critic and author Eleanor Heartney, who curated SC.Fellows Part I & II. “The recipients of the award were selected solely on the basis of artistic merit, and as the works reveal, they work in media ranging from ceramic, papermaking and textiles to painting, sculpture, photography, installation and assemblage. The work is equally diverse in content. The fellowship winners present private worlds, wrestle with social and political issues, explore the expressive potential of abstraction, and celebrate the complexities and beauties of the natural world.” Heartney is a contributing editor for Art in America magazine and the author of several books, including Art & Today (2008). In 2004 she curated Thresholds, the traveling exhibition of art from five Southern states organized by the S.C. Arts Commission. In 2009, she curated The State Art Collection: Contemporary Conversations, a two-part traveling exhibition organized by the commission and 701 CCA. SC.Fellows Part II takes place in spring 2018 at 701 CCA and Benedict College Henry Ponder Gallery.  The exhibition is supported in part by First Citizens. 701 CCA is located at 701 Whaley Street (2nd floor).  During exhibitions, hours are Wed–Sat, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sun, 1 - 5 p.m. The McMaster Gallery is located at 1615 Senate St. During exhibitions, hours are Mon–Fri, 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Find out about other 50th Anniversary Fellowship exhibitions.

Literary and theatre artists invited to apply for fellowships

Application deadline is November 1. The South Carolina Arts Commission is accepting applications for the next round of Individual Artist Fellowships. South Carolina artists working in prose, poetry, acting or playwriting are invited to apply for the 2019 awards. Each fellow receives an unrestricted $5,000 award. Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina’s exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process by out-of-state panelists and are based on artistic excellence only. The awards bring recognition that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. Fellowships are awarded in four disciplines each year. Find complete guidelines and application instructions online. The deadline to apply is Nov. 1, 2017. Related: Who won the most recent round of fellowships?

Congratulations to the new S.C. Arts Commission Artist Fellows!

The South Carolina Arts Commission Board has awarded Individual Artist Fellowships to four South Carolina artists in the categories of visual arts, craft, media: production and media: screenwriting. Each artist receives $5,000. This year's fellows:

Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina's exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process and are based on artistic excellence only. The fellowship awards bring recognition that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. “A fellowship can be a life-changing experience,” said S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May. “Fellows share stories about how the award dollars made a transformative difference and how this validation affected their spirits and their self-perception. South Carolina’s artists are the core of our creative economy and indispensable contributors to quality of life in our communities. A fellowship is one of the best ways that we can say thank you, and we are proud to deliver these tokens of gratitude on behalf of the people of South Carolina.” The S.C. Arts Commission board approves fellowships based on recommendations made by out-of-state review panelists, who select fellows based solely on a review of anonymous work samples. This year's judges for visual and craft were Irwin Pickett, fine art appraiser and co-owner of Heike Pickett Gallery in Versailles, Kentucky; Geno Rodriguez, New York curator, artist and founder of the Alternative Museum; and Clarissa Sligh, artist, lecturer and essayist of Asheville, N.C. Media judges were Sabine Gruffat (production), digital media artist, award-winning filmmaker and associate professor of art at the University of North Carolina; and Joy Goodwin (screenwriting), writer, filmmaker and teacher -- most recently at Elon University. Individual artists working in prose, poetry, acting and playwriting can apply for the FY2019 fellowship awards. Applications open Aug. 7, 2017, and the deadline to apply is Nov. 1, 2017. For more information about S.C. Arts Commission programs and services, visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.

Florence County Museum launches first 50th Anniversary Fellowship Exhibition

[caption id="attachment_31300" align="alignright" width="250"]Terry Jarrard-Dimond Terry Jarrard-Dimond[/caption] The Florence County Museum is the first organization to launch an exhibition of South Carolina Arts Commission Fellows as part of the 50th Anniversary celebration. Evidence, an exhibition of works by veteran South Carolina artist Terry Jarrard-Dimond, is on display June 20 - December 3. Jarrard-Dimond received the S.C. Arts Commission Craft Fellowship Grant in 1987 and is represented by three works in the State Art Collection. The Florence County Museum has a unique relationship to the history of the S.C. Arts Commission. The first president of its board of trustees was E.N. Zeigler, who later became a state senator and the author of the legislation that created the Arts Commission in 1967. The Fellowship Exhibition program was developed to celebrate 50 years of public support for the arts in South Carolina, with emphasis on the achievements of artists who have received the commission’s Visual and Craft Fellowship awards. The exhibition is supported in part by First Citizens. Since 1976, the South Carolina Arts Commission's Fellowship program has recognized the artistic achievements of South Carolina's exceptional individual artists. Fellows are among the most artistically accomplished artists in the state. Find out more about the exhibition. Find out about other 50th Anniversary Fellowship exhibitions.

Reminder: Applications for Southern Prize due March 1

Application deadline: March 1 Atlanta – South Arts is now accepting entries for the first annual Southern Prize and State Fellowships, offering nine individual artists cash awards up to $30,000; the contest is open to artists living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The nine State Fellowship recipients will compete for the South Arts Southern Prize. The $25,000 Southern Prize will be awarded to the artist whose work exhibits the highest artistic excellence, and one finalist will be awarded a $10,000 Prize, also based on artistic excellence. The Southern Prize winner will also receive a two-week residency at The Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences. A national panel will convene to evaluate the body of work represented by the nine State Fellowship recipients and select the Prize winner and Finalist. Winners of the South Arts Prize will be announced at the awards ceremony April 24. An exhibition of works by the State Fellowship winners may be organized during the award period. “Our region is home to deep artistic talent deserving additional recognition and support,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “We are launching the Southern Prize to celebrate the diverse range of expression in our region, from the traditional arts handed down across generations to the new creative processes coming from our technology centers.” Artists may apply for the Southern Prize until March 1 through southarts.org/southernprize. Artists specializing in crafts, drawing, experimental, painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media styles are eligible. The Southern Prize is supported by South Arts’ member state arts agencies, MailChimp, and individuals, and powered by The Hambidge Center. South Arts also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: South Arts

South Arts launches Southern Prize cash award and Fellowships for visual artists

Application deadline: March 1 Atlanta – South Arts is now accepting entries for the first annual Southern Prize and State Fellowships, offering nine individual artists cash awards up to $30,000; the contest is open to artists living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. One fellowship will be awarded to an individual artist in each state with a cash prize of $5,000. The state fellows will then be in competition for the Southern Prize grand prize and second prize of an additional $25,000 and $10,000 respectively. “Our region is home to deep artistic talent deserving additional recognition and support,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “We are launching the Southern Prize to celebrate the diverse range of expression in our region, from the traditional arts handed down across generations to the new creative processes coming from our technology centers.” Artists may apply for the Southern Prize until March 1 through southarts.org/southernprize. Artists specializing in crafts, drawing, experimental, painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media styles are eligible. “The Southern Prize will impact the careers of artists in our region,” continued Surkamer. “These fellowships and awards will be part of the support system allowing artists in the South to make a living in our region. A panel of expert judges will adjudicate submissions, and the state fellowships will be awarded in mid April. The grand prize and second prize will be announced at an awards dinner on April 24. The Southern Prize is supported by South Arts’ member state arts agencies, MailChimp, and individuals, and powered by The Hambidge Center. South Arts also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: South Arts

Furman Music Professor Mark Kilstofte receives coveted Copland House Award

Note: Mark Kilstofte received South Carolina Arts Commission Music Composition Fellowships in 2001 and 2012. Furman University Music Professor Mark Kilstofte has received a 2016 Copland House Residency Award. The award was granted to nine gifted American composers from nine states, and marks Kilstofte’s fourth time to be honored by Copland House. The Copland House prize consists of an all-expense-paid stay at Aaron Copland's National Historic Landmark home in New York's Lower Hudson Valley. The honor provides composers the opportunity to focus on their creative work in the same inspiring environment enjoyed by Copland himself for the last 30 years of his life. The honorees were selected out of nearly 100 applicants from 25 states by a jury including composers Pierre Jalbert (a two-time Copland House Resident), Carman Moore, and Robert Sirota (Former-President of the Manhattan School of Music). On an individual basis, the Residents will live and work for three to eight weeks in the prairie-style, hilltop house near New York City that Copland called "my hideaway, my solitude," and was his home from 1960 to 1990. In addition to three previous Copland House Residency Awards, Kilstofte's honors include the Rome Prize, Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships, ASCAP's Rudolf Nissim Prize, and the Goddard Lieberson Fellowship and Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His music has been featured on NPR's “Performance Today” and “From the Top” and performed by the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, New York Virtuoso Singers, New Amsterdam Singers, and Dale Warland Singers. His song cycle, "The White Album" (commissioned by the Fromm Foundation and developed during a previous Copland House Residency), will be premiered by Musiqa (Houston) this January. As a Copland House Resident, Kilstofte will become eligible for post-residency awards, commissions, and various performance and recording opportunities from the Music from Copland House ensemble. Possibilities include the Sylvia Goldstein Award, Borromeo String Quartet Award, Hoff-Barthelson Music School Commission, and others. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College and the University of Michigan where he was a Rackham Predoctoral Fellow. A resident of Greenville, Kilstofte teaches music composition and theory at Furman, and is guest researcher at the University of Oslo's Center for Ibsen Studies, where he is writing an opera based on Ibsen's "Brand." An official project of the federal Save America's Treasures program, Copland House is the only composer's home in the United States devoted to nurturing and renewing America's rich musical heritage through a broad range of public, educational, musical, and electronic-media activities that embrace the entire creative process. Additional information about Copland House can be found at www.coplandhouse.org. For more information, contact the Furman News and Media Relations office at (864) 294-3107.

One Columbia gives Terrance Henderson the 2016 Steve Morrison Visionary Award

From The Free Times Article by Kyle Peterson

Terrance HendersonThe arts and history non-profit One Columbia has announced its 2016 Steve Morrison Visionary Award winner is Terrance Henderson, a dynamic creative presence in Columbia as an actor, dancer, educator and choreographer. The annual award, now in its third year, is presented to an individual who is a true leader in driving the artistic growth and vitality of the city. Born in Newberry and a Columbia resident since 1996, Henderson has served as a long-term artist in residence at both Logan and A.C. Moore Elementary Schools where he teaches dance and drama, but his role in the arts community extends far beyond that. He has long focused on art that illuminates provocative societal issues in both his theatrical work and original creations, while also striving to provide opportunities for those not formally trained in either dance or theatre. Along the way he’s won awards from the Jazz Dance World Congress in Chicago, the South Carolina Arts Commission’s Fellowship in Performance, Broadway World and Jasper magazine (where, full disclosure, I serve as assistant editor). Some of his more recent creations include The Black Man … Complex at Trustus Theatre, Ruins as part of Harbison Theatre’s MTC Performance Incubator, and Blank Page Poetry: Words and Shadows at the 701 Center for Contemporary Art. Henderson’s selection marks a turn from past award winners like Columbia City Ballet Artistic and Executive Director William Starrett and Riverbanks Zoo Director Satch Krantz, both of whom are more senior figures in the community. As a vital and contemporary artistic force in the, and one explicitly engaged in political and social issues, this perhaps indicates a shift towards more daring and cutting-edge figures that are being celebrated for their work in the moment and their future potential, rather than people with long histories in the Columbia arts scene. Henderson will be formally presented with his award Nov. 12 on Main Street in Columbia during the Jam Room Music Festival.

Using recycled materials, Jarod Charzewski’s site-specific installation targets consumerism

Jarod Charzewski is the South Carolina Arts Commission's 2016 Visual Arts Fellow. Applications for the next round of Fellowships are due November 1.

From The Free Times

Article by August Krickel

Soil is on view Oct. 27 - Dec. 8 at USC's McMaster Gallery, 1615 Senate St., Columbia. Opening reception: Oct. 27 from 5 - 7 p.m.

Image above: Jarod Charzewski’s Scarp

Artist Jarod Charzewski sits on a pile of lumber in the University of South Carolina’s McMaster Gallery. Next to him is a larger mound of salvaged inner tubes and bicycle tires. Over the next six days, Charzewski, an associate professor of sculpture at the College of Charleston, will use these materials to create a site-specific installation for his solo exhibition Soil.

He hopes to make a statement on contemporary consumer culture and on what he describes as the abundant “quantity of wasted materials, and the unsustainability of consumer practice.”

“Something really struck me when I was very young,” Charzewski recalls, “when I found out that my elementary school was built on a landfill site, and that immediately grabbed a hold of my imagination. I thought of being able to cut open the earth and look at layers of trash. Throughout my career, I’ve built these different kinds of landscapes out of different things. It’s about being able to round up large quantities of materials, and it’s astonishingly easy to accumulate these things, and that becomes part of the piece.”

He’s done similar work before, but never with inner tubes. His installation Scarp opened at the College of Charleston in 2008, consisting of some 5,000 articles of clothing, borrowed from — and later returned to — Goodwill. A wooden and cardboard framework fixed the garments in multicolored layers, suggesting geological formations, much as he plans for Soil.

In an artist’s statement for the Columbia installation Charzewski says “the materials will be organized and positioned neatly in the gallery to create the appearance of sedimentary layers of earth. This aesthetic will reference the transitional Columbia, South Carolina, landscape, as it is located on the cusp of the Lowcountry and the Appalachian Mountains. All materials will be recycled after the exhibition closes.”

Charzewski describes how he will build a detailed and calculated framework with the lumber, stretching the tires and tubes on top of it.

He anticipates “a lot of experimentation and figuring it out — that’s something I teach my students all the time. You can’t Google how to do this. You have to think quickly and be resourceful. ... I get into the site, and feel it out, and see what I need to do.”

Named by the South Carolina Arts Commission as 2016’s Visual Arts Fellow, Charzewski has several permanent installations in restaurants and corporate lobbies in Charleston and is working on a permanent outdoor piece for the Blythewood branch of the Richland Library.

McMaster Gallery Director Shannon Lindsey says that the themes in Charzewski’s work appealed to the gallery’s selection committee, which reviewed some 150 submissions after a call for artists for the current season.

“We were looking for interdisciplinary artists who may not define themselves through one particular craft or medium, or that could really appeal to all the facets that we offer here in the School of Visual Art and Design,” she says.

Charzewski’s proposed project presented unique challenges. Unlike a painter, he couldn’t simply unload finished work and hang it. Instead, he must physically be in the space before beginning work. Art students will help with the construction, and the artist will give lectures to classes in the School of Earth, Ocean and Environment.

For Charzewski, the environment has always been an influence. Raised in Manitoba, Canada, the artist says that “it’s hard to grow up in the prairies without thinking about wide, open spaces, and that sense of the infinite. Any place you grow up informs who you are, your psychology, and your makeup, and that has always translated into my work.”