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Reminder: Applications for Southern Prize due March 1

Application deadline: March 1 Atlanta – South Arts is now accepting entries for the first annual Southern Prize and State Fellowships, offering nine individual artists cash awards up to $30,000; the contest is open to artists living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. The nine State Fellowship recipients will compete for the South Arts Southern Prize. The $25,000 Southern Prize will be awarded to the artist whose work exhibits the highest artistic excellence, and one finalist will be awarded a $10,000 Prize, also based on artistic excellence. The Southern Prize winner will also receive a two-week residency at The Hambidge Center for the Creative Arts and Sciences. A national panel will convene to evaluate the body of work represented by the nine State Fellowship recipients and select the Prize winner and Finalist. Winners of the South Arts Prize will be announced at the awards ceremony April 24. An exhibition of works by the State Fellowship winners may be organized during the award period. “Our region is home to deep artistic talent deserving additional recognition and support,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “We are launching the Southern Prize to celebrate the diverse range of expression in our region, from the traditional arts handed down across generations to the new creative processes coming from our technology centers.” Artists may apply for the Southern Prize until March 1 through southarts.org/southernprize. Artists specializing in crafts, drawing, experimental, painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media styles are eligible. The Southern Prize is supported by South Arts’ member state arts agencies, MailChimp, and individuals, and powered by The Hambidge Center. South Arts also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: South Arts

South Arts launches Southern Prize cash award and Fellowships for visual artists

Application deadline: March 1 Atlanta – South Arts is now accepting entries for the first annual Southern Prize and State Fellowships, offering nine individual artists cash awards up to $30,000; the contest is open to artists living in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. One fellowship will be awarded to an individual artist in each state with a cash prize of $5,000. The state fellows will then be in competition for the Southern Prize grand prize and second prize of an additional $25,000 and $10,000 respectively. “Our region is home to deep artistic talent deserving additional recognition and support,” said Susie Surkamer, executive director of South Arts. “We are launching the Southern Prize to celebrate the diverse range of expression in our region, from the traditional arts handed down across generations to the new creative processes coming from our technology centers.” Artists may apply for the Southern Prize until March 1 through southarts.org/southernprize. Artists specializing in crafts, drawing, experimental, painting, photography, sculpture, and mixed media styles are eligible. “The Southern Prize will impact the careers of artists in our region,” continued Surkamer. “These fellowships and awards will be part of the support system allowing artists in the South to make a living in our region. A panel of expert judges will adjudicate submissions, and the state fellowships will be awarded in mid April. The grand prize and second prize will be announced at an awards dinner on April 24. The Southern Prize is supported by South Arts’ member state arts agencies, MailChimp, and individuals, and powered by The Hambidge Center. South Arts also receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: South Arts

Furman Music Professor Mark Kilstofte receives coveted Copland House Award

Note: Mark Kilstofte received South Carolina Arts Commission Music Composition Fellowships in 2001 and 2012. Furman University Music Professor Mark Kilstofte has received a 2016 Copland House Residency Award. The award was granted to nine gifted American composers from nine states, and marks Kilstofte’s fourth time to be honored by Copland House. The Copland House prize consists of an all-expense-paid stay at Aaron Copland's National Historic Landmark home in New York's Lower Hudson Valley. The honor provides composers the opportunity to focus on their creative work in the same inspiring environment enjoyed by Copland himself for the last 30 years of his life. The honorees were selected out of nearly 100 applicants from 25 states by a jury including composers Pierre Jalbert (a two-time Copland House Resident), Carman Moore, and Robert Sirota (Former-President of the Manhattan School of Music). On an individual basis, the Residents will live and work for three to eight weeks in the prairie-style, hilltop house near New York City that Copland called "my hideaway, my solitude," and was his home from 1960 to 1990. In addition to three previous Copland House Residency Awards, Kilstofte's honors include the Rome Prize, Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellowships, ASCAP's Rudolf Nissim Prize, and the Goddard Lieberson Fellowship and Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. His music has been featured on NPR's “Performance Today” and “From the Top” and performed by the Santa Fe Desert Chorale, New York Virtuoso Singers, New Amsterdam Singers, and Dale Warland Singers. His song cycle, "The White Album" (commissioned by the Fromm Foundation and developed during a previous Copland House Residency), will be premiered by Musiqa (Houston) this January. As a Copland House Resident, Kilstofte will become eligible for post-residency awards, commissions, and various performance and recording opportunities from the Music from Copland House ensemble. Possibilities include the Sylvia Goldstein Award, Borromeo String Quartet Award, Hoff-Barthelson Music School Commission, and others. He is a graduate of St. Olaf College and the University of Michigan where he was a Rackham Predoctoral Fellow. A resident of Greenville, Kilstofte teaches music composition and theory at Furman, and is guest researcher at the University of Oslo's Center for Ibsen Studies, where he is writing an opera based on Ibsen's "Brand." An official project of the federal Save America's Treasures program, Copland House is the only composer's home in the United States devoted to nurturing and renewing America's rich musical heritage through a broad range of public, educational, musical, and electronic-media activities that embrace the entire creative process. Additional information about Copland House can be found at www.coplandhouse.org. For more information, contact the Furman News and Media Relations office at (864) 294-3107.

One Columbia gives Terrance Henderson the 2016 Steve Morrison Visionary Award

From The Free Times Article by Kyle Peterson

Terrance HendersonThe arts and history non-profit One Columbia has announced its 2016 Steve Morrison Visionary Award winner is Terrance Henderson, a dynamic creative presence in Columbia as an actor, dancer, educator and choreographer. The annual award, now in its third year, is presented to an individual who is a true leader in driving the artistic growth and vitality of the city. Born in Newberry and a Columbia resident since 1996, Henderson has served as a long-term artist in residence at both Logan and A.C. Moore Elementary Schools where he teaches dance and drama, but his role in the arts community extends far beyond that. He has long focused on art that illuminates provocative societal issues in both his theatrical work and original creations, while also striving to provide opportunities for those not formally trained in either dance or theatre. Along the way he’s won awards from the Jazz Dance World Congress in Chicago, the South Carolina Arts Commission’s Fellowship in Performance, Broadway World and Jasper magazine (where, full disclosure, I serve as assistant editor). Some of his more recent creations include The Black Man … Complex at Trustus Theatre, Ruins as part of Harbison Theatre’s MTC Performance Incubator, and Blank Page Poetry: Words and Shadows at the 701 Center for Contemporary Art. Henderson’s selection marks a turn from past award winners like Columbia City Ballet Artistic and Executive Director William Starrett and Riverbanks Zoo Director Satch Krantz, both of whom are more senior figures in the community. As a vital and contemporary artistic force in the, and one explicitly engaged in political and social issues, this perhaps indicates a shift towards more daring and cutting-edge figures that are being celebrated for their work in the moment and their future potential, rather than people with long histories in the Columbia arts scene. Henderson will be formally presented with his award Nov. 12 on Main Street in Columbia during the Jam Room Music Festival.

Using recycled materials, Jarod Charzewski’s site-specific installation targets consumerism

Jarod Charzewski is the South Carolina Arts Commission's 2016 Visual Arts Fellow. Applications for the next round of Fellowships are due November 1.

From The Free Times

Article by August Krickel

Soil is on view Oct. 27 - Dec. 8 at USC's McMaster Gallery, 1615 Senate St., Columbia. Opening reception: Oct. 27 from 5 - 7 p.m.

Image above: Jarod Charzewski’s Scarp

Artist Jarod Charzewski sits on a pile of lumber in the University of South Carolina’s McMaster Gallery. Next to him is a larger mound of salvaged inner tubes and bicycle tires. Over the next six days, Charzewski, an associate professor of sculpture at the College of Charleston, will use these materials to create a site-specific installation for his solo exhibition Soil.

He hopes to make a statement on contemporary consumer culture and on what he describes as the abundant “quantity of wasted materials, and the unsustainability of consumer practice.”

“Something really struck me when I was very young,” Charzewski recalls, “when I found out that my elementary school was built on a landfill site, and that immediately grabbed a hold of my imagination. I thought of being able to cut open the earth and look at layers of trash. Throughout my career, I’ve built these different kinds of landscapes out of different things. It’s about being able to round up large quantities of materials, and it’s astonishingly easy to accumulate these things, and that becomes part of the piece.”

He’s done similar work before, but never with inner tubes. His installation Scarp opened at the College of Charleston in 2008, consisting of some 5,000 articles of clothing, borrowed from — and later returned to — Goodwill. A wooden and cardboard framework fixed the garments in multicolored layers, suggesting geological formations, much as he plans for Soil.

In an artist’s statement for the Columbia installation Charzewski says “the materials will be organized and positioned neatly in the gallery to create the appearance of sedimentary layers of earth. This aesthetic will reference the transitional Columbia, South Carolina, landscape, as it is located on the cusp of the Lowcountry and the Appalachian Mountains. All materials will be recycled after the exhibition closes.”

Charzewski describes how he will build a detailed and calculated framework with the lumber, stretching the tires and tubes on top of it.

He anticipates “a lot of experimentation and figuring it out — that’s something I teach my students all the time. You can’t Google how to do this. You have to think quickly and be resourceful. ... I get into the site, and feel it out, and see what I need to do.”

Named by the South Carolina Arts Commission as 2016’s Visual Arts Fellow, Charzewski has several permanent installations in restaurants and corporate lobbies in Charleston and is working on a permanent outdoor piece for the Blythewood branch of the Richland Library.

McMaster Gallery Director Shannon Lindsey says that the themes in Charzewski’s work appealed to the gallery’s selection committee, which reviewed some 150 submissions after a call for artists for the current season.

“We were looking for interdisciplinary artists who may not define themselves through one particular craft or medium, or that could really appeal to all the facets that we offer here in the School of Visual Art and Design,” she says.

Charzewski’s proposed project presented unique challenges. Unlike a painter, he couldn’t simply unload finished work and hang it. Instead, he must physically be in the space before beginning work. Art students will help with the construction, and the artist will give lectures to classes in the School of Earth, Ocean and Environment.

For Charzewski, the environment has always been an influence. Raised in Manitoba, Canada, the artist says that “it’s hard to grow up in the prairies without thinking about wide, open spaces, and that sense of the infinite. Any place you grow up informs who you are, your psychology, and your makeup, and that has always translated into my work.”

Fellowships for visual arts, craft, media production and screenwriting

Application deadline is November 1. The South Carolina Arts Commission is accepting applications for the next round of Individual Artist Fellowships. South Carolina artists working in visual arts, craft, media: production or media: screenwriting are invited to apply for the 2018 awards. Each Fellow receives $5,000. Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina’s exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process by out-of-state panelists and are based on artistic excellence only. The awards bring recognition that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. Fellowships are awarded in four disciplines each year. The application is now an online process. Find complete guidelines and application instructions online. The deadline to apply is Nov. 1, 2016. Related: Who won the most recent round of fellowships?

Congratulations to the new group of South Carolina Arts Commission Fellows!

The South Carolina Arts Commission Board has awarded Individual Artist Fellowships to four South Carolina artists in the categories of prose, poetry, dance: choreography and dance: performance. Each artist receives $5,000. This year's fellows (pictured above, left to right):

Fellowships recognize and reward the artistic achievements of South Carolina's exceptional individual artists. Fellowship awards are made through a highly competitive, anonymous process and are based on artistic excellence only. The fellowship awards bring recognition that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. “South Carolina's artists enhance our quality of life and are vital to the creative industries that contribute to the state's economy," said S.C. Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May. "It is fitting that we recognize the work of successful artists who use their talents and passion to benefit our thriving arts community and inspire others." The S.C. Arts Commission board approves fellowships based on recommendations made by out-of-state review panelists, who select fellows based solely on a review of anonymous work samples. This year's judges were Anton DiScalfani (prose), assistant professor at Auburn University and author of the New York Times bestseller, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls; Jericho Brown, (poetry), assistant professor in the creative writing program at Emory University in Atlanta and author of two award-winning books of poetry: Please and The New Testament; Bala Sarasvati (choreography), director of Concert Dance Company and modern dance coordinator for the University of Georgia; and Daniel Gwirtzman, (dance performance), assistant professor at Kennesaw State University in Georgia and director of the New York City-based Daniel Gwirtzman Dance Company. Individual artists working in visual arts, craft, media screenwriting and media production can apply for the FY2018 fellowship awards. Applications open Aug. 15, 2016, and the deadline to apply is Nov. 1, 2016. For more information about S.C. Arts Commission programs and services, visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.

Reminder – Artist Fellowship applications due Nov. 2

South Carolina artists working in prose, poetry, dance choreography, and dance performance may apply for a 2016-2017 Individual Artist Fellowship Award from the South Carolina Arts Commission. One fellowship of $5,000 will be awarded in each of the four categories. The deadline to apply is Nov. 2. Application guidelines are available at www.SouthCarolinaArts.com.

The Individual Artist Fellowship program encourages the pursuit of artistic excellence and provides financial support to South Carolina artists of merit. The award is unrestricted, and past fellows have used the award for professional development, projects, travel or living expenses. “As a teacher, summer is when I usually do freelance work to finance a few weeks of writing time,” said Scott Gould of Greenville, the 2014-2015 prose fellow. “Because of the fellowship, I was able to devote 100 percent of my time to working on my own creative endeavors instead of chasing magazine editors or invoices. This was huge for me.”

Past fellows agree that fellowships offer endorsements that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. “The fellowship was pivotal to my choosing to continue developing my art in South Carolina,” said Marcy Jo Yonkey-Clayton of Columbia, the 2012-2013 choreography fellow. “The honor was validating and connected me to a wonderfully diverse and supportive arts community.”

Since 1976, the Arts Commission has awarded more than 200 fellowships to actors, craftsmen, poets, screenwriters, visual artists, musicians and others in recognition of exemplary artistic talent. Fellows are recommended by out-of-state review panelists, who make selections based solely on a review of anonymous work samples. These recommendations are approved by the Arts Commission Board. For more information, visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.

S.C. Academy of Authors announces annual awards in fiction and poetry

The S.C. Academy of Authors has expanded its annual award competitions to include a separate category for student writers of fiction and poetry and an increase in prize money. Thanks to a recurring grant from the Penelope Coker Hall and Eliza Wilson Ingle Foundation, the SCAA will now sponsor two prizes in both fiction and poetry. The Elizabeth Boatwright Coker Fellowship in Fiction and the Elizabeth Boatwright Coker Student Prize in Fiction will offer winning authors $1500 and $1000, respectively. The grant honors the memory and literary legacy of the late Elizabeth Boatwright Coker (1908-1993), who was herself an SCAA inductee in 1991. Likewise, the Carrie McCray Nickens Poetry Fellowship and SCAA Student Prize in Poetry will offer winning authors $1500 and $1000, respectively. Fellowship winners in fiction and poetry will be invited to the SCAA induction ceremony and awards brunch in Anderson, S.C., in April, 2016; their entries will be published in Fall Lines, an annual literary journal published by Muddy Ford Press in Columbia. Student Award winners in each category will also be invited to the SCAA Awards brunch. The entry deadline for all awards is Dec. 1, 2015. Applicants for the Fellowships in Fiction and Poetry must be full-time South Carolina residents.   Applicants for the Student Awards in Fiction and Poetry must be 18-25 at the time of submission, legal residents of South Carolina, and enrolled full time at a private or public South Carolina institution of higher education.  Complete submission guidelines can be found at www.scacademyofauthors.org. Questions about the fiction prizes may be directed to Jon Tuttle at juttle@fmarion.edu; questions about the poetry prizes may be directed to Libby Bernardin at libbypoet@gmail.com. The Fellowship in Fiction is now in its fifth year. Previous winners are Rachel Richardson of Spartanburg (2015), Nancy Brock of Columbia (2014), Thomas McConnell of Spartanburg (2013), and Craig Brandhorst of Columbia (2012). This year’s fiction judge is Ron Carlson, the award-winning author of four story collections and five novels, most recently Five Skies and Return to Oakpine. His fiction has appeared in Harper’s, The New Yorker, Playboy, and GQ, and has been featured on NPR’s This American Life as well as in Best American Short Stories and The O. Henry Prize Stories. Carlson is the director of the UC Irvine writing program and lives in Huntington Beach, California. Recent winners of the Carrie McCray Nickens Poetry Fellowship include Barbara G.S. Hagerty of Charleston (2015), Jo Angela Edwins of Florence (2014), Susan Laughter Meyers of Givhans (2013), and Kit Loney of Charleston (2012).  This year’s poetry judge is Joseph Bathanti, former Poet Laureate of North Carolina and the author of eight books of poetry, including This Metal, nominated for the National Book Award, and winner of the Oscar Arnold Young Award, and Restoring Sacred Art and Concertina, both winners of the Roanoke Chowan Prize. Bathanti is Professor of Creative Writing at Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C. About the South Carolina Academy of Authors The South Carolina Academy of Authors was founded at Anderson College in 1986. Its purpose is to identify and recognize the state’s distinguished writers and their influence on our cultural heritage. The Academy board selects new inductees annually whose works have been judged culturally important. Each inductee, whether living or deceased, has added to South Carolina’s literary legacy by earning notable scholarly attention or achieving historical prominence. Entry fees help support the SCAA in its mission to preserve and promote South Carolina’s literary legacy. For more information about the South Carolina Academy of Authors, visit www.scacademyofauthors.org.

Individual Artist Fellowship applications due Nov. 2

South Carolina artists working in prose, poetry, dance choreography, and dance performance may apply for a 2016-2017 Individual Artist Fellowship Award from the South Carolina Arts Commission. One fellowship of $5,000 will be awarded in each of the four categories. The deadline to apply is Nov. 2. Application guidelines are available at www.SouthCarolinaArts.com.

The Individual Artist Fellowship program encourages the pursuit of artistic excellence and provides financial support to South Carolina artists of merit. The award is unrestricted, and past fellows have used the award for professional development, projects, travel or living expenses. "As a teacher, summer is when I usually do freelance work to finance a few weeks of writing time," said Scott Gould of Greenville, the 2014-2015 prose fellow. "Because of the fellowship, I was able to devote 100 percent of my time to working on my own creative endeavors instead of chasing magazine editors or invoices. This was huge for me."

Past fellows agree that fellowships offer endorsements that may open doors to other resources and employment opportunities. "The fellowship was pivotal to my choosing to continue developing my art in South Carolina," said Marcy Jo Yonkey-Clayton of Columbia, the 2012-2013 choreography fellow. "The honor was validating and connected me to a wonderfully diverse and supportive arts community."

Since 1976, the Arts Commission has awarded more than 200 fellowships to actors, craftsmen, poets, screenwriters, visual artists, musicians and others in recognition of exemplary artistic talent. Fellows are recommended by out-of-state review panelists, who make selections based solely on a review of anonymous work samples. These recommendations are approved by the Arts Commission Board. For more information, visit www.SouthCarolinaArts.com or call (803) 734-8696.