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CoroArt contest encourages experimentation

The COROART contest in the U.S. is underway


Coroplast Tape Corporation has delivered a variety of technical adhesive tapes to Winthrop University where visual art students of Shaun Cassidy, professor of fine arts, were invited to reinvent the materials in innovative ways. While there is no specific thematic content or subject direction given, the concept of COROART is focused on experimenting with modern and technical materials. The completed works of art will be displayed first at Coroplast Tape Corporation’s U.S. headquarters in Rock Hill. Select pieces will then be moved to the Arts Council of York County’s Center for the Arts where they will be on display from Nov. 20-24, 2019. A public reception and the COROART Awards presentation will be held at the Center for the Arts on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 from 5-7:30 p.m. The students are contending for the COROART Award presented by the Coroplast Tape Corporation. These awards are accompanied by cash prizes funded by Coroplast, and include 1st Prize ($1,000), 2nd Prize ($500), and 3rd Prize ($250). The 2019 COROART Awards jury includes a panel of three judges: Ashley Beard (Arts Council of York County Board member, art teacher), Harriet Goode (artist, owner: Gallery 5), and Tom Stanley (artist, Winthrop University [retired]). For more information about Coroplast’s commitment to the arts and COROART, visit https://www.coroplast-tapes.com/en/company/coroart-usa/.

NEA awards grants to S.C. Arts Commission, others in state

$933,900 coming (back) to South Carolina

$80 million awarded across U.S. by NEA


WASHINGTON—The National Endowment for the Arts announces $80.4 million for 1,114 new awards located in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and four U.S. jurisdictions. This is the Art Endowment’s second major grant announcement of fiscal year 2019, and these awards continue the Arts Endowment’s commitment as the only arts funder reaching the entire country. Awards from this round of funding come from four categories: Art Works II, Our Town, state and regional partnerships and Research: Art Works, plus a renewal in NEA Research Labs. “Reflecting the diverse artistic richness of our nation, these Arts Endowment-funded projects are varied in their size, scope, and artistic discipline,” said Arts Endowment Acting Chairman Mary Anne Carter. “The projects also illustrate the unique geographic reach of Arts Endowment funding, serving Americans in places large and small in all corners of the country.” Grants recommended in this round are listed in two ways:
  • State/jurisdiction and listed by city/town and
  • Funding category (Art Works II, Our Town, state and regional partnerships, and Research: Art Works) and then listed by artistic discipline/field.
In the first funding round of fiscal year 2019 announced on February 13, 2019 the Arts Endowment made 1,145 grants totaling $27 million. Other awards will be made in the coming months through the end of the fiscal year on September 30. All current grants can be viewed through the Arts Endowment’s grants search.
SOUTH CAROLINA: 5 awards totaling $933,900
  • Columbia Film Society, Columbia $22,500; Art Works - Media Arts
  • South Carolina Arts Commission, Columbia $811,400; Partnerships (State & Regional)
  • Greenville Symphony Association/Greenville Symphony Orchestra, Greenville $10,000; Art Works - Music
  • City of Rock Hill $75,000; Our Town - Design
  • Hub City Writers Project, Spartanburg $15,000; Art Works - Literature
Ken May, S.C. Arts Commission executive director: “At the Arts Commission, our grant will be put to use serving communities throughout the state. It will fund community arts development initiatives that seek to foster the creativity and unity needed to address the unique issues facing rural South Carolina communities. It will further our goals to provide every South Carolina child with access to an arts-inclusive education. It will also let us help our artists develop their skills to grow businesses that contribute to the state’s $9.7 billion creative economy.”
ART WORKS II: 977 awards totaling $23,983,500 Art Works is the Arts Endowment’s largest category with projects supported in 13 artistic disciplines and fields in this Art Works II group, ranging from arts education to visual arts. Grant amounts range from $10,000 to $100,000 with a median amount of $20,000. Examples of Art Works-supported projects in this round are:
  • A $10,000 award to the Madison Public Library Association in Madison, Wisconsin (a first-time Arts Endowment grantee) to support programming at the Wisconsin Book Festival featuring award-winning authors of genres such as literary fiction, poetry, and science.
  • A $10,000 award to Shreveport Opera in Shreveport, Louisiana to support the Shreveport Opera Xpress educational touring program, which offers performances and activities for public school students in central and south Louisiana.
  • A $15,000 award to the Pioneer School of Drama in Danville, Kentucky to support Voices Inside: The Northpoint Prison Writing and Performance Project, where theater professionals will conduct workshops for inmates at the Northpoint Training Center.
  • A $20,000 award to Cultural Resources in Rockport, Maine to support the Wabanaki Arts Mentorship Program, where accomplished Wabanaki artists will instruct youth in basket-making techniques and cultural knowledge.
  • A $30,000 award to the City of Phoenix to support a partnership with the city’s Neighborhood Services Department and the Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture to provide grants for intergenerational arts projects.

OUR TOWN: 57 awards totaling $4,115,000 Our Town is the Arts Endowment’s signature creative placemaking program that supports partnerships of artists, arts organizations, and municipal government that work to revitalize neighborhoods. Two program areas are place-based projects with grants ranging from $25,000 to $200,000, and knowledge building projects with grant amounts ranging from $25,000-$100,000. This year’s cohort is remarkable for its diversity. Approximately a third of the recommended grantees are first-time applicants to the Arts Endowment. The types of communities vary widely with 18 recommendations for projects in rural or tribal communities. And project types range from cultural planning to festivals and cross several artistic disciplines. Examples of Our Town-supported projects are:
  • A $25,000 award to the Mohawk Nation at Akwesasne in Hogansburg, New York, the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe will undertake a project to engage local artists and designers to develop public art and architecture that reflects Akwesasne Mohawk culture.
  • A $50,000 award to the City of Granite Falls in Minnesota to establish an artist residency program within local government. The program is the first of its kind in a small, rural setting, and has the potential to serve as a national model for other small communities.
  • An $85,000 grant to the Santa Fe Art Institute to re-enliven the shuttered campus of the former Santa Fe College of Art and Design by inventorying the campus’s cultural assets and creating community arts events to build enthusiasm around the campus’s development potential and to advance community goals.
In addition to funding, the Arts Endowment advances creative placemaking through publications and resource development. Those resources are available on the creative placemaking page.
STATE AND REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENTS: 64 awards totaling $51,456,500 Through partnership agreements, the Arts Endowment translates national leadership into local and regional benefit. Every U.S. state and jurisdiction has its own state arts agency that coordinates cultural policies and invests in arts programming on behalf of, or as part of, state/jurisdiction government. The geographically-defined consortium of state arts agencies known as regional arts organizations are funded to manage programs across state, national, and international borders. Together, these organizations receive 40 percent of the Arts Endowment’s grantmaking funds each year to support their activities and to leverage state and other public and private funds. Partnership Agreements help support life-long learning in schools and communities, community economic development through creative districts, and arts participation through artist tours, festivals, readings, and exhibits. Some examples of state and regional programming funded by partnership agreements are:
  • The Delaware Division of the Arts and Delaware State Parks have been working together since 2008 to offer arts-in-the-park programming that has increased the number and diversity of visitors to state parks.
  • Through its Arts and Military Initiative, the Oklahoma Arts Council works with the state’s Department of Veterans Affairs and a local partner to provide arts activities to residents at the Oklahoma Veterans Center in Norman.
  • Through its Launchpad initiative, South Arts is providing mentorships and other professional development services to presenting organizations beginning or expanding in the South Arts region.
RESEARCH: ART WORKS: 15 awards totaling $724,000 Research: Art Works supports research that investigates the value or impact of the arts, either as individual components of the U.S. arts ecology or as they interact with each other and with other domains of American life. Some examples of this year’s awardees are:
  • A $20,000 award to MINDPOP in Austin, Texas will support a study led by researchers from the Austin Independent School District and the University of Texas at Austin that examines relationships between schools and arts partners participating in a collective impact arts education project.
  • An $88,000 award to the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio will support a randomized controlled trial examining the arts’ ability to improve health, resilience, and well-being in individuals with chronic health conditions.
Final reports for previously-awarded Research: Art Works grants are posted on the study findings page of the Arts Endowment website. A renewal of an NEA Research Lab to the University of Arkansas' Department of Education Reform for $150,000 will support research that examines the impact on social, emotional and other individual characteristics of elementary school students who participate in field trips to arts institutions.

About the National Endowment for the Arts

Established by Congress in 1965, the NEA is the independent federal agency whose funding and support gives Americans the opportunity to participate in the arts, exercise their imaginations, and develop their creative capacities. Through partnerships with state arts agencies, local leaders, other federal agencies, and the philanthropic sector, the NEA supports arts learning, affirms and celebrates America’s rich and diverse cultural heritage, and extends its work to promote equal access to the arts in every community across America. For more information, visit www.arts.gov.
Image by Kendall Hoopes/Pexels

Applications sought for $30k public art design commission in Rock Hill

Application deadline: Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018


The Women’s Art Initiative (WAI) of Rock Hill is a public art advocacy group whose mission is to enhance the quality of life for the community by reflecting its cultural values and artistic vitality through public art.  [caption id="attachment_34666" align="alignright" width="260"] The world-famous Hub Calls for Art Megaphone.[/caption] In collaboration with the city of Rock Hill, WAI is seeking proposals from artists/designers to create a contemporary, outdoor design feature, sculpture, or artwork at the entry of Comporium’s Telephone Museum on Elk Avenue. It will serve to celebrate communication and technology; specifically its multi-level history in the city of Rock Hill and its vast, endless possibilities for innovation. Thus, it will provide opportunities for dialogue emphasizing the increasing impact of technology and communication on our future. The piece shall exemplify the communication concept as one in constant evolution and act as an engaging and educating entrance area into the space directly adjacent to the Telephone Museum. The piece must be child/family friendly and ideally have an interactive or kinetic feature. WAI will select one artist’s/ designer’s proposal whose vision for this project incorporates these themes. The artist/designer will be responsible for the design, creation, transportation, and installation of the project and will work with the WAI Selection Committee and city of Rock Hill staff. Artists/designers of 18 and up are invited to apply by Oct 31, 2018. Go here to read more about it!

About WAI

A group of women… artists, professionals, civic leaders and enthusiasts formed a group to bring public art to our community.
Our vision is to grow into a public art institution with annual funding; providing acquisition, preservation, education and community dialogue.

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Recording preserves famed organ’s signature sound

Earlier this year, internationally renowned musician Parker Ramsay visited Winthrop University to record an album of George Whitefield Chadwick’s organ music on the university's famed D.B. Johnson Memorial Organ. It is the last recording on the organ before renovations to Byrnes Auditorium that will temporarily prevent its use began. Enthusiasts of the historic organ can still revel in its signature sound captured in the Raven Label recording until the organ is once again available for performances. Winthrop commissioned the organ’s construction in 1952 by the Aeolian-Skinner company. It is named for the Winthrop founder and first president. The large four-manual instrument with 3,788 pipes, the last instrument of famed tonal designer G. Donald Harrison, makes the organ to this day one of the largest in the Carolinas. During its 50th anniversary in 2005, the treasured instrument underwent extensive restoration efforts thanks to generous supporters and Winthrop alumni. Given the Byrnes makeover, admirers said now it is even more critical to preserve both the sound of the instrument and the building, equally highlighted on Ramsay’s recording of Chadwick’s music. “It’s a uniquely American artifact, and this recoding preserves that signature sound … it’s a national treasure in so many ways,” said Murray Somerville, who helped establish the Friends of the D.B. Johnson Memorial Organ Performance Fund along with his wife, Hazel, a Winthrop alumna from the class of 1969. Hazel served on the faculty of Vanderbilt University as artistic director of the children's choruses at the Blair School of Music. Somerville, artistic director emeritus of Nashville's Music City Baroque period instrument ensemble, and former Harvard University organist and choirmaster, performed a recital on the classic organ in 2016 and was instrumental in coordinating the production of Ramsay’s CD. Music lovers can purchase the CD in the Winthrop Bookstore during the Nov. 16-17 Homecoming & Reunion Weekend or buy directly from Raven. The recording – featured recently on Michael Barone’s "Pipedreams" radio program – is a debut for Ramsay, a young musician already regarded for his accomplishments and blossoming career on three instruments: organ, harp and harpsichord. The CD features Ramsay on organ playing compositions of George Whitefield Chadwick, who was president of the New England Conservatory in the early 1900's and a noted composer of symphonies and orchestral tone poems. Some of the pieces on this CD are first recordings, enhanced by Byrnes’ acclaimed acoustics. “We have this wonderful memento of [the organ] … and its acoustic setting, in all its tonal splendor,” Somerville said. Other world-famous musicians have visited Byrnes solely to perform on the famous organ, including:

  • Princeton University Organist Eric Plutz, who spent the summer of 2012 recording his “French Trilogy” CD,
  • Juilliard-trained organist Christopher Houlihan,
  • Westminster Abbey organist James O'Donnell,
  • German musicians Christoph Wolff and Stefan Engels,
  • and Canadian organ virtuoso Maxine Thevenot.
For more information about how to give to the Friends of the D.B. Johnson Memorial Organ Performance Fund, contact University Advancement at 803.323.2275.

Fast-growing S.C. region adds professional orchestra

It is the hub of a region that has three of the top 20 fastest-growing communities in South Carolina (and two of the top three). It boasts the state's first officially-recognized cultural district. And now Rock Hill has a professional orchestra, joining several others across the state in Aiken, Charleston, Columbia, Florence, Greenville, Hilton Head, Myrtle Beach, and Spartanburg. Read more about the genesis of the new cultural offering from the Herald. The three-concert inaugural season begins in September and runs through next May, but a "sneak peek" offering is coming June 10. Congratulations to York County and everyone at the Rock Hill Symphony!

Image courtesy of the Rock Hill Herald.

Milly

Winthrop students get $30,000 grant to create art for Rock Hill traffic circle

From the Rock Hill Herald Article by Bristow Marchant

Next spring, Winthrop University students will have a chance to create a permanent art display for one of Rock Hill’s main traffic arteries. The Rock Hill City Council on Monday approved the use of a $30,000 grant to have students at Winthrop’s College of Visual and Performing Arts design the artwork that will be placed in the new traffic circle under construction on Constitution Boulevard and Columbia Avenue. Fine arts professor Shaun Cassidy will lead the design project, with plans to submit a proposal for consideration by the end of the 2016 spring semester. Work began earlier this month to clear the roadside around the intersection after the council approved a contract for the $4.1 million project in September. The circle also will connect traffic with West White Street, which currently ends on Columbia. The traffic circle design is a public art project of the Rock Hill Designs for Rock Hill Places initiative, a collaboration between the city and the Rock Hill Economic Development Corp. “The goal of Rock Hill Designs is to incorporate locally created, locally inspired art into areas of public investment,” said Allan Miller with the RHEDC’s quality of life committee. Miller presented the proposal to the council on Monday, arguing the new roundabout offers the perfect location for a Rock Hill Designs art project, since it will feed into the Winthrop University campus and the planned Knowledge Park residential/commercial development along West White Street. “As the gateway to Knowledge Park and also Winthrop, this is an ideal place to use art to bring together education and economic development,” Miller said. The city will pay for the artwork using $30,000 out of a grant the city received in July from the National Endowment for the Arts. Another portion of the grant, totaling $50,000, will go toward the Woolworth Walkway planned for East Main Street, which will honor Rock Hill’s civil rights history. The walkway was the first public arts project approved through the Rock Hill Designs initiative, and is slated for completion early next year. Rock Hill economic development director Stephen Turner said the goal of Rock Hill Designs is to create a more visually pleasing environment using money the city would have to spend anyway on routine construction and landscaping costs for a project such as the traffic circle. “We’re already going to spend the money, but this will get us a very different project,” Turner said. The quality of life committee also plans to raise about $7,500 through the Barre Mitchell Community Initiative Fund. The City Council voted to approve a project agreement with Winthrop University and the RHEDC setting out the terms of the project. The agreement requires Winthrop to “lead a public design process” in line with the goals of Rock Hill Designs, in which students and faculty will work alongside “professional artists, urban design professionals and the city of Rock Hill.” Miller said that process will involve a “community engagement” component, likely including public meetings to review design proposals next spring.

Rock Hill Designs invites proposals for public art and design features

Application deadline is July 7. The Rock Hill Designs Committee is seeking qualifications from artists and designers in creating distinctive, permanent design features within the Woolworth Walkway, which will serve as the connecting corridor between the recently constructed Old Town Market area and the mid-block of Main Street in the City of Rock Hill. The committee is seeking proposals from artists located in the Southeast region only (S.C., N.C., Ga., Tenn., Va.) due to the high level of community engagement that is expected. The anticipated budget for the artist engagement/design portion of this project is $18,000.  The proposed budget is intended to cover all associated costs for the visioning & design selection process including artist and apprentice fees, materials, travel and convening expenses.  Excluded from this budget is the final implementation and installation of accepted design. The integrated design features will be located in a new walkway being created on the site of the former Woolworth building on Main Street in Rock Hill, S.C., which is currently being demolished.  Main Street Rock Hill has a rich civil rights history: the Woolworth & McCrory’s lunch counters were the location of the “Friendship Nine” sit-in in 1961, which ultimately resulted in the “Jail No Bail” stance that was replicated in civil rights protests across the South. One of the goals of this project is to incorporate this history into a theme of civil rights/social justice within the spaces that will be created. The selected artist will be part of a design team including the City’s selected architect and civil engineer that will incorporate locally inspired themes into the spaces created by the project. Strong preference will be given to artists who demonstrate experience and success with engagement of local residents and students in the creation of locally imagined themes and spaces. Rock Hill Designs is a collaborative effort including the City of Rock Hill, Rock Hill School District 3, Winthrop University, Clinton College, York Technical College, the Arts Council of York County, the Rock Hill Economic Development Corporation’s Quality of Life Committee and other interested parties whose goal is to facilitate incorporating locally inspired art into the design of new public investments in the Rock Hill Community. View complete information and apply. Via: Rock Hill Designs