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Grants Roundup: Deadlines for the Week of Feb. 11

Though far from the only thing, grants are certainly among the main things we do here. And because of their importance in our work, and what they mean to so many of you, The Hub wants to help keep Arts Commission grants top-of-mind and reduce the number of people who say, "If only we'd known about X grant!" We can't reach everybody, but we can try. On Mondays with deadlines on the horizon, "Grants Roundup" highlights first what grants are due that week and then includes what's coming later in increments.


GrantsThis week

These are to serve mainly as final reminders to finish in-progress applications. Most grant applications simply cannot be undertaken well in this short a time frame. Consult your county or discipline coordinator with questions.

Next week

  • n/a

Next 30(ish)

Important Notes

  • You are encouraged to also consult the SCAC deadline page for up-to-date information on all grant deadlines (subject to change) and deadlines for non-grant programs.
  • For next steps, grant guidance, and more information, consult:
    • your county coordinator if you represent local organizations, businesses, or educational institutions, or
    • your discipline coordinator if you're an individual artist or serve the statewide population.

Grants Roundup: Deadlines for the Week of Feb. 4

Though far from the only thing, grants are certainly among the main things we do here. And because of their importance in our work, and what they mean to so many of you, The Hub wants to help keep Arts Commission grants top-of-mind and reduce the number of people who say, "If only we'd known about X grant!" We can't reach everybody, but we can try. On Mondays with deadlines on the horizon, "Grants Roundup" highlights first what grants are due that week and then includes what's coming later in increments.


GrantsThis week

These are to serve mainly as final reminders to finish in-progress applications. Most grant applications simply cannot be undertaken well in this short a time frame. Consult your county or discipline coordinator with questions.
  • n/a

Next week

Next 30(ish)

  • n/a (more to come next week - see first note below)

Important Notes

  • You are encouraged to also consult the SCAC deadline page for up-to-date information on all grant deadlines (subject to change) and deadlines for non-grant programs.
  • For next steps, grant guidance, and more information, consult:
    • your county coordinator if you represent local organizations, businesses, or educational institutions, or
    • your discipline coordinator if you're an individual artist or serve the statewide population.

Develop young minds using the arts (and get a grant to do it)

Serve tomorrow today with an AEP grant from the SCAC

Application deadline extended: Friday, Feb. 15, 2019 (for FY20) The deadline for Arts Education Projects (AEP) grant has been extended to Friday, February 15, 2019. AEP grants fund projects and programs that use the arts to meet the educational, developmental, and social needs of South Carolina's K-12 students, whether in-school or otherwise. That's right: these grants are for schools (public or private), community groups, government agencies, faith organizations, and ... well, anybody. The only stipulation is that you have to be using the arts to develop young minds.

So, what does that look like?

Here are two examples of current AEP grantees:
  • The famed Gaillard Center in Charleston received $10,500 for teacher professional development in the arts.
  • The Sue-Ham Community Development Center in Williamsburg County received $8,900 to help underwrite a community theatre production and some associated workshops.
Two groups. One urban, one rural. One large, one small. One doing teacher training, one putting on a show. They encapsulate the best thing about an AEP grant: no matter who you are or where you are, you have access to grant money to using the arts as you impact the next generation. This year's largest grant was $13,500 and the smallest was about $3,500. You can use an AEP grant to cover half of your project's expenses. A panel of arts professionals will review all applications and recommend funding to our board of commissioners. To learn more, visit the grant guidelines.

SCAC grant supports Claflin campers’ ‘Aladdin Jr.’ performance

Here's a brief grantee spotlight from The Times & Democrat:

Claflin University is hosting an intensive residential camp designed to provide high-level artistic instruction to youth entering grades six through 10 in a college environment. It is funded through a S.C. Arts Commission arts education grant.

The camp will conclude on Saturday, June 16 with a musical theater production of Disney’s “Aladdin Jr.”

Claflin University Intensive (CUSAI) Residential Camp participants are taking classes led by college professors in acting, art (graphic design and jewelry making), dance, music and video production while preparing for the culminating musical theatre production featuring music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman, Tim Rice and Chad Beguelin, and book by Chad Beguelin.

Participants are also mentored by college students majoring in one of the artistic disciplines.

Go here to read the full story!

Arts Education Project (AEP) grants due next week!

Educators: are you finalizing your AEP (Arts Education Project) Grant applications? The deadline is Tuesday, Jan. 16. UPDATE: The deadline is extended to Monday, Jan. 22. AEP Grants support well-developed arts education programs and projects in both traditional arts education settings (schools, arts organizations) and other organizations that use the arts to advance learning (social service, health, community, education or other organizations). Funded projects and programs can take place in school, after school or over the summer. Grants of up to $15,000 are available (grantees must match their grant 1:1). An AEP Grant would support such programs as:

  • After-school classes
  • Workshops
  • Camps
  • Artist residencies
  • Public art projects
  • Performances
  • Exhibitions
  • Acquisition of critical equipment or supplies
  • Program planning
  • Professional development for instructors, artists and/or administrators
And others, as the list is not exhaustive. Most S.C. schools, nonprofit organizations (arts and non-arts), colleges and universities, and units of government are eligible to apply. Go here to learn more and apply.  

Arts Education Project grants available for after-school programs, artist residencies, planning, etc.

Application deadline is January 18, 2017, for funding beginning July 1, 2017. The South Carolina Arts Commission invites applications for 2017 Arts Education Project Grants (AEP) to support well-developed arts education programs and projects in both traditional arts education settings (schools, arts organizations) and other organizations that use the arts to advance learning (social service, health, community, education or other organizations). Funded projects and programs can take place in school, after school or over the summer. Grants of up to $15,000 are available (grantees must match their grant 1:1). Most S.C. schools, nonprofit organizations (arts and non-arts), colleges and universities, and units of government are eligible to apply. (ABC sites are not eligible.) Partnerships are especially encouraged. Individual artists wishing to implement K-12 arts projects should partner with an eligible school or organization that will serve as the applicant and project administrator. Examples of eligible activities include, but are not limited to:

  • After-school classes
  • Workshops
  • Camps
  • Artist residencies
  • Public art projects
  • Performances
  • Exhibitions
  • Acquisition of critical equipment or supplies
  • Program planning
  • Professional development for instructors, artists and/or administrators
This grant program was developed based on the work by the 2014 Arts Education Task Force, which was created to respond to new research and a new climate for education and arts education reform in South Carolina. One of the opportunities identified by the task force is to offer new arts education funding and join with new community partners and afterschool/summer program providers to extend the reach of arts education funding. Read the complete guidelines and application instructions online. Your county coordinator is available to answer additional questions. The application deadline is January 18, 2017.

Gibbes Museum boosting arts education for Title 1 students

The Gibbes Museum of Art received a $15,000 Arts Education Project grant from the South Carolina Arts Commission to help fund the Arts Access program, which provides free admission to Title 1 schools. gibbesartsaccessFrom WCSC Charleston:

The Gibbes Museum of Art is working to boost arts education in Title 1 schools with a special “Arts Access” program for students. "A lot of them have never been to a museum before so it's important for them to see this space, this community museum that's for them,” Rebecca Sailor, educational curator of the Gibbes Museum of the Arts, said. The Arts Access program allows students in Title 1 schools, which receive extra funding for a high number of kids from low-income families, the opportunity to tour the museum for free. Students also participate in hands-on activities. "My favorite part is learning stuff but at the same time having activities to do,” Hursey Elementary 5th grader Sha,ronn said. "I just love to watch their faces and their expressions and the comments they make quietly to their selves,” Heather Teems, an art teacher, said. The Arts Access program also covers the costs of transportation to the museum. "We wouldn't be able to afford it. The school wouldn't be able to afford the bus, to be able to come that many times.  I don't think these children would come on their own if they hadn’t had a chance to come here,” Teems said. Museum staff coordinate the tours and programming to support teachers in-classroom curriculum. “We work very closely with the teachers to make sure we’re coordinating with their curriculum,” Sailor said. “That’s very important. We’re not doing our thing; we’re doing their thing.” The program is currently funded through the S.C. Arts Commission and Wells Fargo. The town of Kiawah also supports the program for Johns Island students.  Schools from Charleston, Berkeley and Dorchester Title 1 schools are eligible for the program. For more information on educational opportunities at the Gibbes, visit here

Arts Council of Chester County assisting schools with grant funds

The Arts Council of Chester County received a South Carolina Arts Commission Arts Education Project Grant to expand art classes, exhibits and performances, with some of the funds dedicated to buying arts materials for teachers. In this video, Chester Middle School teacher Lane Wallace talks about the importance of arts education and how she'll use the Arts Council's donation. Video from CN2 News

Columbia Children’s Theatre’s Romeo and Juliet offers modern twist for middle school and high school audiences

Columbia Children's Theatre received a South Carolina Arts Commission Arts Education Project grant to help support this production. Columbia Children's TheatreWhat happens when your star-crossed lovers carry cell phones, use iPads and sing 1960s love songs? You get Columbia Children's Theatre's Altered Visions Tour production of Romeo and Juliet, designed to appeal to middle school and high school students. Before launching its tour of schools in February, Columbia Children's Theatre (CCT) will present this innovative 60-minute version of Shakespeare's classic to the public on January 29, 30 and 31. USC professor and former Globe Theatre intern Cathy Brookshire has helmed this updated, contemporarily conceived production since October when CCT received an Arts Education Projects Grant from the South Carolina Art Commission. The production uses six professional actors taking on all the roles with a modern twist. Arguably Shakespeare's most famous play, Brookshire's Romeo and Juliet is designed to fit into a typical high school block period and is conceived in a modern, accessible fashion to help high school students more easily grasp the language. Says Brookshire, "it's what happens when we boil Shakespeare's most iconic plays down to their bare essentials: six actors in 35 roles!" The two casts include George Dinsmore, Harrison Ayer, Kate Chalfant, Georgie Harrington, Mary Miles, Cole McFaden, Taylor Diveley, Frances Farrar, Evelyn Clary, Marcus Moore and Andy Nyland. Each of the two casts will perform twice during the in-house launch January 29-31 and flow in and out during the upcoming tour. The show also features an original soundscape by Toni Moore. Teachers and educators who book the production will receive S.T.E.A.M. (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics) focused, arts-infused lesson plans for non-arts teachers to incorporate into their curriculum using Romeo and Juliet as a launching pad. Schools interested in having the production at their school can contact CCT Artistic Director Jerry Stevenson at jerry@columbiachildrenstheatre.com or (803) 691-4548. Show times for the public kick-off are Friday, January 29 at 7:00 p.m., Saturday, January 30 at 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. and Sunday, January 31 at 3:00 p.m. The special "sneak peek" admission rate for this production is $5 regular admission and $3 for active military and seniors with proper ID. Tickets may be purchased securely online at columbiachildrenstheatre.com.  South Carolina educators and arts administrators with proper ID will receive free admission to any of the performances. The production is recommended for ages 12 and up. All shows take place at Columbia Children's Theatre, 2nd level of Richland Mall, 3400 Forest Drive, Columbia, S.C. Columbia Children's Theatre is a professional resident not-for-profit theatre dedicated to providing quality live theatre experiences for families and young audiences and is supported in part by the City of Forest Acres, and the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. Via: Columbia Children's Theatre

Milly

The art’s in the mail: Halsey Institute exhibition showcases correspondence art

[gallery columns="4" ids="24816,24810,24817,24809,24812,24813,24811,24818"] The Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art, located in Charleston, S.C., received a South Carolina Arts Commission Arts Education Project grant to help support this exhibition. “You’ve got mail” has different meanings, depending upon one’s age and current communications style.  The Halsey Institute’s exhibition, Correspondence Art: Words, Objects, and Images by Ray Johnson, Richard C., and Bob Ray, will appeal to those nostalgic for a time when keeping in touch could mean waiting a day or more for letter delivery, while also introducing the concept of creating and mailing art to young people accustomed to reaching their friends instantly via text. Also known as postal art and mail art, correspondence art is a populist artistic movement centered on sending small-scale works through the postal service. It initially grew out of the Fluxus movement in the 1950s and 1960s and has since developed into a global movement that continues to present day. “This exhibition brings together three of the most prolific mail artists in the history of the genre,” said Halsey Director and Chief Curator Mark Sloan. “There have been many well-known artists who have dabbled in mail art -- On Kawara, Yoko Ono, Joseph Beuys, Andy Warhol, etc. -- but very little scholarly attention has been given to the genre.” [caption id="attachment_24807" align="alignright" width="250"]Halsey Institute Education Coordinator Maya McGauley Halsey Institute Education Coordinator Maya McGauley sorts through some of the mail art received[/caption] Conceptual artist Ray Johnson (1927–1995) was a mail art pioneer, using a variety of graphic and textual elements to correspond with artists, writers, and thinkers, including Richard C. and Bob Ray. Vintage mail art between these three artists forms the historical backdrop for the exhibition, with the remaining works consisting of words, objects and images sent to Sloan by Richard C. and Bob Ray in the past year. A number of the works are collaborations between these two artists. Sloan believes the exhibition will rekindle the sense of wonder of sending and receiving postal mail. “The concept of pen pals seems so old-fashioned for most people under 50. People over 50 will recall those wistful days when people actually sent hand-written thank you notes and postcards from vacation destinations, as opposed to texts and Facebook posts. People under 50 may discover that the U.S. Post Office is a pretty good deal. Look at what can be legitimately sent through the mail!” The exhibition includes an education component designed to foster new connections between students at six Charleston-area schools: Memminger School of Global Studies, downtown Charleston; Northside Elementary School, Walterboro; C. E. Williams Middle School, suburban Charleston; Rollings Middle School of the Arts, Summerville; Lincoln Middle/High School, McClellanville; and Academic Magnet High School, North Charleston. Artist Bob Ray will be in residence from Jan. 22 through Feb. 11, working with students on correspondence art projects that combine elements of visual arts, English language arts, and social studies, according to Lori Kornegay, curator of art and public engagement. “Students will join Bob in the gallery to learn how he makes his art and how it fits into art history, and then our education coordinator, Maya McGauley, will visit each school to work with the students in class. We’re pairing the two elementary schools, the two middle schools and the two high schools. Students will research their community, school or family, select a topic to write about and create their own works of art that will then be mailed to students at their partner school. We expect that each student will create between two and five pieces of correspondence art, and we’ll encourage them to also mail their art to Bob Ray and to South Carolina legislators.” The project will culminate with an exhibition comprised of student-created correspondence art to be held at the Charleston County Public Library in May. Each teacher will be provided with a large self-addressed stamped envelope in which to mail all of the correspondence art they have received to the Halsey Institute. “We hope this project will be the beginning of a continuing relationship between these schools, which were chosen with geographic diversity in mind, and we hope to inspire the students to continue sending each other correspondence art,” said Kornegay. “It will no doubt spark amazing connections and create, at least for some, lifelong pen pals! For some students, it may be their first time on a college campus, so visiting (the Halsey) could be a step toward imagining that experience as a part of their future. We believe the program will also be an excellent opportunity to introduce students, their parents and the school’s administration and faculty to the excellent educational resources available to them here at the Halsey.” Correspondence Art: Words, Objects, and Images by Ray Johnson, Richard C., and Bob Ray opens Jan. 22 and runs through March 5. To find out more about the artists, the exhibition and related programs (including correspondence art projects for the public) visit the Halsey Institute’s website. This residency and exhibition are funded in part by the South Carolina Arts Commission, which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts.