2nd Act Film Project returns Oct. 30 in Columbia

Two screenings at Trustus Theatre


The 2nd Act Film Project, an endeavor of the Jasper Project, will premier its 6th season of short films on October 30 at Trustus Theater in Columbia’s historic Vista. There will be two screenings, at 7 and 9:15 p.m. Tickets are $15-20 and are available via Eventbrite.com. Ten filmmaking teams, selected from an open call for entries, will each debut an original short film having been provided with the 1st and 3rd acts of a screenplay and tasked with writing the 2nd act and creating the film in its entirety. Teams are provided a small stipend to fund their projects. The 2019 2nd Act Film Project teams are led this year by David Axe, Ian O’Briant, Amy Brower, William Woody, Jennifer Baxley, Sean Parsons, Silas Rowland, Henry Coonrod, Taiyen Stevenson, and Daniel Colella. Wade Sellers is the project director. For more information on the 2nd Act Film Project, go to www.secondactfilmafestival.com.

About the 2nd Act Film Project

The 2nd Act Film Project is a unique take on the film project concept. The goal of the 2nd Act Film Project is to promote the growth of independent filmmaking in Columbia and grow the network of independent filmmakers throughout South Carolina. Founded in 2013, the project has already produced 50 films. The 2nd Act Film Project Is presented by the Jasper Project - a non-profit arts organization based in Columbia (www.JasperProject.org).

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CoroArt contest encourages experimentation

The COROART contest in the U.S. is underway


Coroplast Tape Corporation has delivered a variety of technical adhesive tapes to Winthrop University where visual art students of Shaun Cassidy, professor of fine arts, were invited to reinvent the materials in innovative ways. While there is no specific thematic content or subject direction given, the concept of COROART is focused on experimenting with modern and technical materials. The completed works of art will be displayed first at Coroplast Tape Corporation’s U.S. headquarters in Rock Hill. Select pieces will then be moved to the Arts Council of York County’s Center for the Arts where they will be on display from Nov. 20-24, 2019. A public reception and the COROART Awards presentation will be held at the Center for the Arts on Friday, Nov. 22, 2019 from 5-7:30 p.m. The students are contending for the COROART Award presented by the Coroplast Tape Corporation. These awards are accompanied by cash prizes funded by Coroplast, and include 1st Prize ($1,000), 2nd Prize ($500), and 3rd Prize ($250). The 2019 COROART Awards jury includes a panel of three judges: Ashley Beard (Arts Council of York County Board member, art teacher), Harriet Goode (artist, owner: Gallery 5), and Tom Stanley (artist, Winthrop University ). For more information about Coroplast’s commitment to the arts and COROART, visit https://www.coroplast-tapes.com/en/company/coroart-usa/.

Tuning Up: #SCartists, SCAC fellows figure in prominent exhibitions

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


It's not going to be 95 degrees today, so even though this is a Monday, we've got that going for us. Here are some tidbits on The Hub's radar:
  • The Aiken Standard has a nice review/preview of 2019 Biennial at Columbia's 701 Center for Contemporary Art. #SCartists abound, including S.C. Arts Commission Fellows.
  • More Columbia: Art Project Furthers Columbia’s Connection With German Sister City (Free Times). TL;DR: just click and read because you won't be sorry. The Hub has lived in Columbia for 20-some years and had no idea we have a sister city... Kaiserslautern. In Germany. (Or anywhere. But we did know South Carolina's sister state is Queensland, Australia.) Sadly, that is about as long as the partnership among the cities' artists, so demerits to The Hub and kudos for art partnerships of all kinds. You'll see several familiar names involved.

Milly

National artist-run spaces network launches project in Greenville

In Front of Your Eyes: Hannah Cole, Jodi Hays & Celia Reisman Presented by Tiger Strikes Asteroid Greenville Oct. 4-Nov. 27, 2019


Tiger Strikes Asteroid Greenville (TSA GVL) and the Greenville Center for Creative Arts (GCCA) are excited to announce their October exhibition, In Front of Your Eyes, featuring the work of acclaimed painters Hannah Cole, Jodi Hays, and Celia Reisman. The exhibition, which will be TSA GVL’s inaugural project, was curated by Mark Brosseau and will take place in the main gallery space at GCCA’s Brandon Mill location. The show opens with a First Friday reception from 6-9 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 4 and continues until Nov. 27. The exhibition will also be open during the Nov. 1 First Friday. There will be an ARTTalk on Tuesday, Nov. 12 from 6-7 p.m. as part of the exhibition. In Front of Your Eyes is generously sponsored by Coldwell Banker Caine. The three artists featured in this exhibition all take the source for their respective works from common objects and places in their immediate environment. They paint the things that are often overlooked or not considered interesting or beautiful. They take the time to notice the anomalies in those common scenes around them and use those surprises as the foundation for intriguing bodies of work. Reisman paints the neighborhoods near her suburban Philadelphia home. She picks up on odd relationships and uses them to create dynamic and bizarre paintings of places that many would consider to be overwhelmingly normal. The focus of Cole’s work is not only things that are overlooked, but things that are also considered to be undesirable or detritus. Her nearly trompe l’oeil paintings of graffiti and weeds allows viewers to notice the beauty in the forms of these things that go unnoticed and unwanted when they are noticed. Hays’ works are extrapolations from the world around her. Objects in her neighbor’s backyard, things hanging from the front porches across the street, or patterns that she grew up with all undergo a transformation as she distills them down to basic visual elements and allows the paintings to grow lyrically from those foundations. It is important to these three artists to find beauty in their everyday environments while avoiding making assumptions about what they see. Their painting subjects are the ones that they have spent the most amount of time in while raising children. They don’t allow the routine or domestic to become mundane; instead they view each encounter with it as an opportunity to notice something new and to reach a new understanding of their respective worlds. These are important lessons in a time when snap judgments are commonplace and little emphasis is placed on the nuance of a situation. The exhibition is free and open to the public. For more information, contact TSA GVL at greenville@tigerstrikesasteroid.com and GCCA at exhibitions@artcentergreenville.org.

About the artists

Hannah Cole lives in Asheville. She did her undergraduate study at Yale University received her Master of Fine Art from Boston University. She has had 14 solo exhibitions, including a large-scale show at the Turchin Center for Visual Art in Boone, N.C. in 2018. Her next solo show opens at Tracey Morgan Gallery in Asheville in September of 2019. She has been awarded fellowships to do residencies at the Ucross Foundation in Clearmont, Wyo. and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos, N.M. Her business, Sunlight Tax, provides information and classes to artists about taxes. She is represented by Slag Gallery in Brooklyn and Tracey Morgan Gallery. Jodi Hays is based in Nashville. She is a member of the faculty at the Watkins College of Art there. She received her Bachelor of Fine Art from the University of Tennessee in Knoxville and her Master of Fine Art from the Vermont College of Arts. Her 19th solo exhibition, Tend, just opened in August at the Red Arrow Gallery in Nashville. She was recently selected for the short list for the inaugural Hopper Prize and has received fellowships from the Vermont Studio Center and grants from the Sustainable Arts Foundation and the Tennessee Arts Commission. She has run Dadu – an alternative curatorial venture based in her detached adjacent dwelling unit – since 2015. She is represented by Red Arrow Gallery and Flat File Art in Montclair, N.J. Celia Reisman lives in Merion, Pa., just outside of Philadelphia, and in Sharon, Vt. She received her bachelor of Fine Art from Carnegie Mellon University and her Master of Fine Art from Yale University. She has had more than 30 solo exhibitions in her illustrious career, including a survey of her work at the James A. Michener Museum in Doylestown, Pa. in 2000. Her work is in the collection of the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, the James A. Michener Museum, and other public and corporate collections. She has received a purchase prize from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, as well as awards from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts and the Leeway Foundation. She is represented by Gross McCleaf Gallery in Philadelphia, Paul Thiebaud Gallery in San Francisco, and Big Town Gallery in Rochester, Vt.

About Tiger Strikes Asteroid

Tiger Strikes Asteroid Greenville is the newest part of the Tiger Strikes Asteroid network of artist-run spaces and joins locations Philadelphia, New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago. They are a platform for artists that is curated and organized by a group of artist-volunteers. Their mission is to create the physical, mental, and emotional space for artists to show their work, meet, and exchange ideas on their own terms. TSA GVL will specifically focus on connecting the art communities in Greenville and the greater Southeast to the global art world. TSA was founded in 2009 in Philadelphia and is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

Tuning Up: SCAC Fellows exhibition news

Good morning!  "Tuning Up" is a morning post series where The Hub delivers curated, quick-hit arts stories of interest to readers. Sometimes there will be one story, sometimes there will be several. Get in tune now, and have a masterpiece of a day. And now, in no particular order...


The Hub generally doesn't delve into exhibitions because of volume and their (no offense) rather ubiquitous nature. (Plus, that's why we offer Arts Daily.) However there are exceptions, so let's briefly cover those.
  • Newsworthy exhibitions. This is a must because The Hub is a news website, and we have a journalism degree. Yesterday's post about West Main Artists Co-op? First juried exhibition = newsworthy.
  • The other exception? South Carolina Arts Commission Fellows. #SCartists who receive that particular recognition for artistic excellence get promoted as we can, and The Hub caught wind that two are or will be exhibiting. So let's get you information on those.
  CONTINUUM | Sept. 13-Oct. 18, 2019 | Greenville Metropolitan Arts Council members who are SCAC Visual Arts Fellows are exhibiting at the council's offices. Those artists are Patti Brady, Jamie Davis, Ben Gilliam, Diane Hopkins-Hughs, Elizabeth Keller, Linda McCune, and Mike Vatalaro. An opening reception is TONIGHT from 6:30-8:30 p.m. with a 6 p.m. pre-reception talk by select artists. The exhibition is sponsored by TD Bank. 16 Augusta Rd., Greenville; M-F, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. MICHELLE VAN PARYS: BEYOND THE PLANTATIONS | Oct. 4, 2019 | Boone, N.C. The mountains? In the fall? Check and check. You'll have to act quickly on this one, as it runs only Oct. 4 and only from 6-7:30 p.m. at the Turchin Center for the Performing Arts at Appalachian State University (in conjunction with Boone's Art Crawl). Van Parys will provide an overview of her work as a photographer working with a large-format film camera in the American landscape. The talk will be held in the lecture hall followed by a Q & A session in the Mezzanine Gallery. 423 W. King St., Boone. Free. The S.C. Arts Commission salutes its fellows past and present. Applications are now open for FY2021 fellowships:

West Main Artists Co-op’s first juried exhibition underway

WMAC 2019 open through Oct. 19

North Charleston Arts Fest 2018. File photo by Zan Maddox.
(Ed. note: Pardon The Hub for not posting last week; we were on vacation.) West Main Artists Co-op will host its first regional juried art exhibition -- WMAC 2019 -- open now though Saturday, Oct. 19, in Spartanburg. The show was open to all adult visual artists in South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. The first-place winner will receive $2,500; second-place, $1,000; third-place, $500; and merit awards will total $500. Two-hundred-forty-one (241) artists from the four states applied, and 66 were admitted into the show based on the judgement of jurors Ann DerGara and Mike Vatalaro. These jurors will also work together to  pick the final winners, who will be announced on Saturday, Sept. 21 during a reception and awards ceremony. Seventy-four (74) works of art will be on display. “This exhibit has been a goal of West Main Artists Cooperative for several years,” Co-op Chair Beth Regula said. “We are celebrating our 10th anniversary this year and felt the time was right. What better way to celebrate our hard work than to open our doors to artists from four states and let them celebrate with us?" "Spartanburg is becoming a cultural destination, and this exhibit will only enhance that reputation. We are grateful for the support from this community. As Spartanburg grows and thrives, so do we. When artists and a community work together, we all benefit,” Regula said. Work accepted into the exhibition includes painting, pastel, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, glass, photography, fiber arts, original hand-pulled fine art prints, jewelry, weaving, basketry, and wood. Nearly all of the work will be for sale. “Coordinating WMAC 2019 has been in the making for more than a year,” Regula said. “Having a regional juried exhibition is something we believe is very important in the advancement of the Co-op and in the advancement of the arts in Spartanburg. Art has become a vital force to be reckoned with in Spartanburg, and West Main Artists Co-op is leading the way for regional artists. Our membership includes some of the region’s most noted artists. Our exhibits include artists from many different regions of the southeast. I invite everyone to see this very important exhibition, knowing it is the product of much work and high standards. It will have some of the best art to be found in the four states. As the name implies -- WMAC 2019 -- we plan to make this an annual event!” If You're Going... The artwork in WMAC 2019 will be open for free public viewing Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. A public reception will be Saturday, Sept. 21 from 6-8 p.m. with an awards ceremony at 7 p.m. Another reception will be held on Thursday, Sept. 19, 5-9 p.m., during the city’s monthly ArtWalk. Free. (578 West Main St., Spartanburg, 864.804.6501.)

The Jurors

Ann DerGara began her formal education at Georgia State University. In 1978, a printmaking course at Atlanta College of Art led her to Dick Williams and the innovative and contemporary Odyssey Studio. The artist first pursued etching, collagraphy, and serigraphy printmaking techniques. In 1990 she began her exploration of monoprinting. Roger Caplan of Soho Myriad Fine Art has written, “Looking back on a career that has seen her work exhibited in Europe, Japan and Australia as well as the United States, one is struck by the constant and apparently effortless development of imagery and technique which has left Ann DerGara three steps ahead of familiar imitators.” A practitioner of both abstract and realistic styles, DerGara is the owner of the Red Wolf Gallery in Brevard, NC. Mike Vatalaro has more than 40 years of experience as a professor and studio artist. His work, which includes wood-fired stoneware thrown vessels as well as large terra cotta sculptural forms, has been exhibited nationally and internationally. In 1998, he participated in the IWCAT Workshop and Ceramics Exhibition at Cera Gallery in Tokoname, Japan, and was an Artist Resident at Tainan University of the Arts in Taiwan (2008). His work has been recognized with several grants and awards such as the South Carolina Arts Commission Fellowship for Crafts (1994-1995 and l983-l984), the Walter Gropius Visiting Artist Fellowship in Huntington, West Virginia, and the Watershed Center for Ceramic Art Residency at Newcastle, Maine (2004).

About West Main Artists Co-op

West Main Artists Co-opis a nonprofit and membership-based arts agency, housed on West Main Street in Spartanburg in a converted three-story church. It has more than 50 active members of which about 30 have studio space in the venue. Each month, it hosts three art exhibits and is one of the more-popular venues to visit during the city’s monthly ArtWalk. In addition, it has three galleries, two performance stages, a ceramics studio, a printery, and the most extensive collection of for-sale and locally made art in Spartanburg. For more information, please visit online: WestMainArtists.org.

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North Charleston City Gallery to exhibit works by two #SCartists

The City of North Charleston’s Cultural Arts Department is pleased to announce that mixed media works by Vik Hart of Charleston and Pascale Bilgis of Lexington will be on exhibit at the North Charleston City Gallery from Sept. 1-30, 2019. The artists will host a free public reception for their concurrent solo exhibitions at the gallery on Thursday, Sept. 5, from 5-7 p.m.


"Rising on a Harvest Sky" by Vik Hart "Rising on a Harvest Sky" by Vik Hart

"Far Fields" – New work by Vik Hart (Charleston)

In his exhibition, "Far Fields," Vik Hart presents a series of imaginative acrylic paintings set in a fictional land he calls “Firn.” By setting all of his paintings in this imaginary land, Hart creates narrative strands between his paintings. “I love the idea of world building in fiction,” says Hart, “and one of my goals when I paint is to have information in the work for the viewers who want to know mo re beyond the initial visual image. I often get comments that my pieces remind the viewer of different things they’ve seen before. Often times these will be books, movies, cartoons, and TV shows. While my work isn’t directly derived from any one piece of existing media, I enjoy the general sense of nostalgia it gives to others who see it.” Hart seeks to preserve spontaneity in his artistic practice and works in fast-drying acrylic and watercolor medium so that he can quickly make corrections and changes to his images. Vik Hart received his Associates Degree in Commercial Graphics in 2014 from Trident Technical College. His paintings have been exhibited in group and solo shows throughout Charleston, SC, including shows at The Southern, Redux, Beresford Studios, and Saul Alexander Gallery. He currently teaches a Character Creation class through Fabulon Studios. Learn more about the artist at www.vikhart.com.

"HOME" – New work by Pascale Bilgis (Lexington)

Abstract Expressionist Pascale Bilgis is a multimedia artist focusing on landscapes. In her series "HOME," Bilgis recalls significant landscapes from her own life: the small French village of her childhood; Turkey, where she worked as an archeological photographer; and her current home, South Carolina. Working in acrylic, Bilgis splits her compositions into geometric sections using different color palettes to show the landscapes in different times of day or different seasons. She adds buildings in ceramic or wood relief. The architecture of the buildings helps identify her landscapes as belonging to specific regions: she creates the simple cottages of rural France, the bustling cityscape of Istanbul, and the nostalgic country houses of South Carolina. She chooses to show the buildings in ceramic relief to emphasize the durability of human habitations in contrast to the natural world, which reflects the changing seasons. “As the landscape is ever changing, homes remain in their original state,” Bilgis says. Bilgis received a bachelor's in photography from the University of South Carolina. After graduating, she worked as an archaeological photographer in southern Turkey and as an art assistant at the Pierre LOTI French School of Istanbul. While in Turkey she began to pursue a new passion for painting and ceramics. She currently lives in Lexington, where she has had many solo exhibitions. She is a member of South Carolina Artists. Learn more about the artist at www.pascalebilgis.com.
The North Charleston City Gallery is situated in two corridors of the Charleston Area Convention Center (5001 Coliseum Dr., North Charleston). The exhibition space is at the northwest corner of the Convention Center adjacent to the Coliseum, facing International Boulevard. Parking and admission are free. The gallery is open 9-5 daily, with an attendant present Tuesdays 12-5 p.m., Wednesdays 11 a.m.-5 p.m, Thursdays 11 a.m.-7:30 p.m., and Fridays 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Inquiries regarding the artists or purchase information may be directed to the North Charleston Cultural Arts Department at 843.740.5854. For information on additional exhibits, programs, and events, visit the Arts & Culture section of the City’s website at www.northcharleston.org.

McKissick Museum exhibit has quilting buffs covered

'Piece by Piece' showcases quilting traditions

English-style pieced quilt medallion from the 1950s. English-style pieced quilt medallion from the 1950s. Provided by McKissick Museum.
The University of South Carolina’s McKissick Museum is proud to present the seventh rendition of its Diverse Voices exhibition series, “Piece by Piece: Quilts from the Permanent Collection.” On display through July 18, 2020 “Piece by Piece” illustrates the evolution of this textile tradition over the past 150 years. From the early use of chintz fabrics to the widespread popularity of solid colors, these quilts reflect traditions with roots in Europe, Africa, and the American South. Visitors will have the opportunity to view 40+ quilts over the course of the show, chosen from McKissick Museum’s extensive quilt collection. Because of the fragile nature of historical textiles, individual quilts will be only be displayed for a limited time, with three rotations occurring throughout the year, according to the museum. Throughout the exhibition, panels explore the lives of these textile artists like quiltmaker Hattie Mitchell Grubbs, who was born in Barnwell and lived to be 97. Saddler Taylor, McKissick’s chief curator of folklife and fieldwork, is excited about the exhibition. “Quilts carry a strong sense of familial intimacy and human connection. It's strangely ironic that we know so little about many of the makers. This exhibition features beautiful examples of Southern quilts; but more importantly, we want to tell the story of some of the makers. Only then can the quilts be fully appreciated," Taylor said.
“Piece by Piece” is accompanied by a robust programming calendar, beginning with an opening reception with light refreshments on Sept. 12, 2019 from 5:30-7 p.m. This free reception will feature a curator-led gallery talk beginning at 6 p.m. FOLKFabulous@theFair Oct. 9-20 2019 This year, our signature folklife festival celebrates South Carolina’s rich textile arts heritage, including Native American, African American, and Mennonite quilting traditions, in conjunction with the McKissick exhibition Piece by Piece: Quilts from the Permanent Collection. You’re invited to participate and engage with artists and cultural traditions that make the Palmetto State home! Come to the Rosewoods Building to enjoy arts displays, demonstrations and hands-on craft activities, concerts and hands-on music workshops. You won’t want to miss the chance to try your hand at making a story quilt block or contribute to our yarn-bombing display. FOLKFabulous 2019 is free with SC State Fair admission.   Lunch & Learn: “Quilts and the Stories of My Life” with Peggie Hartwell Oct. 14, 2019 (12-1 p.m.) Grab your lunch and learn more about the life and work of 2017 Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award Winner Peggie Hartwell. Peggie is a fourth-generation African-American quilter and textile educator who is nationally recognized for her unique storytelling form. Lunch & Learn events are free and open to the public; space is limited.   Lunch & Learn: “Interpreting Civil War Quilts: It Gets Complicated” with Jane Pryzybysz Nov. 13, 2019 (12-1 p.m.) Explore the interpretation of civil war era quilts with McKissick Museum's Executive Director, Dr. Jane Pryzybysz.   An Afternoon with Dr. Carolyn Mazloomi (Fall 2019) Recipient of the National Endowment for the Arts National Heritage Fellowship and Founder of the Women of Color Quilters Network.   The Quilt History Project – A Look Back (Fall 2019) Laurel Horton, lead scholar on McKissick Museum's Quilt History Project in 1984-1986.   Quilt Documentation Days (Spring 2020) Dr. Jane Przybysz, Executive Director, McKissick Museum.   Quilts and Wellbeing (Spring 2020) Marsha MacDowell, textile scholar and project director of The Quilt Index. Faculty, Michigan State University, Curator of Folk Arts at the Michigan State University Museum.   Lunch & Learn: “The Blythewood Survey Project” (Spring 2020) Kem Smith, project director for the Blythewood Quilt Survey Project.
McKissick’s calendar of events is updated frequently and available online. Events are free and open to the public unless otherwise stated. “Piece by Piece” and associated programming is made possible through support from the South Carolina Arts Commission and the National Endowment for the Arts.  

Add your 2019/2020 events to Arts Daily

Free. Statewide. Multimedia.


We're not opposed to a shameless plug now and then, but this one is all about YOU. Specifically, helping you. Arts Daily is The Hub's free resource to help promote arts events and artist opportunities. As the only such statewide resource, and partnered as it is with South Carolina Public Radio, it has unparalleled visibility. To help you. Now is the time to add your 2019/2020 arts events to The Hub. Many already have. You don't want to be left out, do you? Arts Daily wants YOUR calls for art (all media), concerts, performances, exhibitions, readings, openings, and so on.
  • Add as much or as little as you want. Familiar with the five W's? They'll do. (Don't forget a link to your event on the web: your website, Facebook event page, etc.). Well-written descriptions, which require less editing time, are more likely to be posted. Which hints at the fact that...
  • Not all submissions are guaranteed to be posted. But most are, especially when... they are written well.
  • Make sure you add your well-written submission AT LEAST one month in advance of your event. Timeliness also helps submissions appear.
  • If you want your event read on our South Carolina Public Radio segments, one month's notice is required. (No exceptions.)
  • This is a big one: Please allow our team up to 10 business days to process your submission. Many are the submissions; few are the hands. We do our best.
Go make it happen, and best of luck this season.

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Jasper Project to release sixth ‘Fall Lines’

The Jasper Project, in partnership with Richland Library, Richland Library Friends and Foundation, and One Columbia for Arts and History, announces the release of Fall Lines – a literary convergence, volume V on Sunday, Aug. 18, 2019 from 2-3:30 p.m. at the main branch of Richland Library (1431 Assembly St., Columbia). Fall Lines – a literary convergence is a South Carolina based print literary journal that solicits submissions of poetry and prose internationally. With more than 500 submissions this year, more than 30 were selected for publication through a blind reading process. The winner of the Saluda River Prize for Poetry is Kimberly Driggers for her poem, “Imagine the Sound of Waves.” The winner of the Broad River Prize for Prose is Derek Berry for his story, “Sasquatch.” Judy Goldman served as the judge for the prose competition and Délana R. A. Dameron served as the judge for poetry.  DéLana R.A. Dameron is the author of Weary Kingdom and How God Ends Us. She is an arts and culture strategist who lives in Brooklyn. Goldman is the author of two award-winning poetry collections and two novels, Early Leaving and The Slow Way Back, which was a finalist for SIBA's Novel of the Year and winner of the Sir Walter Raleigh Fiction Award and the Mary Ruffin Poole Award for First Fiction. Her memoir, Losing My Sister, was a finalist for both SIBA's Memoir of the Year and ForeWord Review's Memoir of the Year. Her work has appeared in Real Simple, The Washington Post, and in many literary journals. She teaches writing workshops throughout the Southeast, and serves on the permanent faculty of Table Rock Writers Workshop. Winners are sponsored by the Richland Library Friends and Foundation. The public is invited to the free release event, readings, and awards ceremony on Sunday, August 18th from 2-3:30 p.m. at the main branch of the Richland Library. Copies of Fall Lines will be available and free.