Joe Riley to receive McNair Award at SC Arts Awards Luncheon

Joe Riley The Honorable Joseph P. Riley, Jr. The South Carolina Arts Foundation will honor Joe Riley, former mayor of Charleston, with the 2017 McNair Award for his dedication in ensuring that the arts continue to play a vital role in our communities. The McNair Award will be presented at a luncheon showcasing the South Carolina Arts Awards, which also honor recipients of the Elizabeth O'Neill Verner Governor's Awards for the Arts and the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Awards. The luncheon takes place in Columbia May 2, beginning with an art sale at 11 a.m. at the USC Alumni Center, 900 Senate St.. The luncheon follows at 12:30 p.m. Established in 2007, the McNair Award is named for the late Governor Robert E. McNair, who signed legislation to create the Arts Commission in 1967 to “ensure that the arts continue to grow and play an ever more significant part in the welfare and educational experiences of our citizens." Originally presented posthumously to Governor McNair, the award continues to honor outstanding leaders who have built on the legacy of the award's namesake: working diligently to make South Carolina a place where the arts thrive for the benefit of all South Carolinians. Luncheon tickets are $50. Reserve tickets online or by calling (803) 734-8696. (Verner Awards and Folk Heritage Awards will be presented May 2 at 11:30 at the Statehouse. The awards ceremony is open to the public.)  

Making Money III: Audience Surveying with Purpose

Early Bird registration extended to April 24. The South Carolina Arts Commission is again partnering with USC's Department of Sport and Entertainment Management to offer Making Money III.  This workshop will help arts organizations of any size to design and execute solid survey projects. Participants will learn simple ways to approach this often challenging work in order to design surveys that result in useful information. A working lunch will give participants a chance to practice what they learn. The session will conclude with report outs and group Q&A about the lunchtime exercise. Featured speaker and national arts consultant Surale Phillips will present a session geared toward South Carolina arts leaders. Who should attend? Making Money III is designed for non-profit and for-profit arts and entertainment executive directors, board members, and marketing and development staff. Making Money III: Audience Surveying with Purpose May 19 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Russell House University Union University of South Carolina—Columbia Campus Early Bird registration: $79 - ends April 24. Two or more from same organization: $69. Space is limited - find out more and register today! Session Descriptions This three-part seminar will include the following topics, featuring guest experts and hands-on learning. Part 1: The key to organizational success and financial stability. Part 2: Make your social media work for you!  Learn about strategies and tips to better engage your patrons and followers. Part 3: This 3.5-hour session with working lunch will help organizations to design and execute solid survey projects. Participants will learn simple ways to approach this often challenging work in order to design surveys that result in useful information. Who should attend? Making Money III is designed for non-profit and for-profit arts and entertainment executive directors, board members, and marketing and development staff. Speakers: Surale Phillips, President and Lead Consultant at Decision Support Partners, Inc. surale_phillipsSurale Phillips has provided research and consulting services to the arts for 25 years. Her work has been the foundation of projects supported by the NEA, Wallace Foundation, Irvine Foundation, Knight Foundation, and other national and local grant makers. Her more than 150 clients have included arts service organizations, municipalities, and nonprofit arts organizations of every discipline in nearly every state. She is a regular coach and presenter at the Americans for the Arts national convention and the National Arts Marketing Project conference. Her most recent workshops were hosted by Convening Culture for the State of Florida, Raleigh Office of Arts, and ArtsMemphis. Jennifer Clark Evins, President/CEO, Chapman Cultural Center, Inc., and 2007 Verner Award Winner evins_jenniferAs President/CEO, Evins heads the 4th largest and oldest local arts agency in South Carolina, leading a conglomerate of seven nonprofit collaborative partners that “co-locate” at the Chapman Cultural Center. Evins joined CCC in August 2010 as Senior Development Director and assumed the duties of the President/CEO in June 2011. Evins’ experience in the nonprofit sector was as a volunteer leader in Spartanburg for nearly 24 years. Most notably, she spearheaded the capital campaign that built the Chapman Cultural Center, raising more than $42 million, and later raising $10 million for a new Spartanburg YMCA. Evins has lead numerous creative placemaking projects including winning the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. Prior to joining the nonprofit field in 2010, Evins had an extensive professional career in marketing and public relations. Armen Shaomian, DMA, Assistant Professor, Dept. of Sport and Entertainment Management armenDr. Shaomian is the producer and creator of the highly acclaimed Making Money series. He has an extensive background in performing arts, education and project management consulting. He is the founder and CEO of Armenize, Inc., an arts consulting agency specializing in non-profit arts management and foundational strategies. Prior work includes programs manager / associate producer for the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts (NFAA) and its signature YoungArts program. In his role as their associate producer, Dr. Shaomian oversaw live performance logistics as well as strategic relations with the Baryshnikov Arts Center in New York City, the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., as well as the United States Department of Education and the United States Presidential Scholars program. His work with the NFAA included cost analysis and contract negotiations, allowing the Foundation to save fiscally while raising the quality of its programming. In 2016, he was nominated for the University of South Carolina’s Michael J. Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award. Dr. Shaomian currently serves on the board of the Music and Entertainment Industry Educators Association (MEIEA).

April Showers is tonight! Tickets available at the door

The April Showers Art Party originally scheduled for April 5 has been RESCHEDULED for Thursday, April 6 at 7 p.m. at 701 Whaley – the same time and location. We hope you will be able to join us. Ticket holders who cannot attend Thursday may request a refund by emailing Angela Brewbaker. Tickets will be available at the door for Thursday, April 6.   April Showers Art Party kicks off 50th Anniversary celebration Since 1967, the South Carolina Arts Commission has served as an umbrella for the arts, working collaboratively in all regions of the state to help establish and support arts organizations, arts education programs and artist development endeavors. With the umbrella as a prominent feature, the South Carolina Arts Foundation is presenting the April Showers Art Party April 5 to kick off the celebration of the Arts Commission's 50th Anniversary. The fun begins at 701 Whaley at 7 p.m. with Singin' in the Rain -- a performance by Ann Brodie's Carolina Ballet -- and continues with a sale of themed art work. The evening finale is a dance party featuring the Finesse Band. Tickets are $75 and are available online. April Showers will also celebrate the 30th Anniversary of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, launched in 1987 by the Arts Commission in partnership with the S.C. Department of Education and Winthrop University. Sixty-seven ABC sites have transformed umbrellas into works of art that will be suspended from the ceiling during the party. After the party, the umbrellas will travel in an exhibition to ABC sites and a few other locations around the state. umbrellacompositehorizontal Left to right: McDonald Green Elementary, Lancaster; S.C. School for the Deaf and the Blind, Spartanburg; Inman Intermediate, Inman; Kelly Miller Elementary, Winnsboro Find more information about April Showers and the Arts Commission's 50th Anniversary online. Artists taking part in the invitational art sale (as of March 21): Angel Allen, Kent Ambler, Kristy Bishop, Connie Brennan, Patti Brady, Louis Bruce, Lou Chandler, Jocelyn Chateauvert, Jeff Donovan, Linda Fantuzzo, Diana Farfan, Jo Ann Graham, Mana Hewitt, Ellen Kochansky, Flavia Lovatelli, Kathy Moore, Marcelo Novo, Tabitha Ott, Rob Shaw, Virginia Watson, and Lynette Youson. Images: First row, left to right: works by Linda Fantuzzo, Rob Shaw, Linda Fantuzzo. Second row, l to r: Kent Ambler, Jeff Donovan, Marcelo Novo. April Showers collage  

Artists U is coming to the Pee Dee!

Attention Pee Dee artists! The Artists U Intensive: Building a Sustainable Life as an Artist is coming to the Soulé Art Space in Florence May 26 and 27. Artists are talented, hard-working people, so why are so many exhausted, broke, and overwhelmed? Artists U will present tools and approaches for building a balanced, sustainable artist life. Based on 10 years of work with artists locally and nationally, artist leaders Andrew Simonet (Philadelphia), Michaela Pilar Brown (Columbia) and Rodney Lee Rogers (Charleston) will offer artists tools for reconnecting with deep values, building community, and managing time and money. Dates and location:

  • Friday, May 26, 7 – 8:30 pm
  • Saturday, May 27, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
  • Location: Soulé Art Space, 130 S. Irby St., Florence, SC 29501
  • How much does it cost? It’s free (but the class size is limited).
  • Who is it for? South Carolina artists.
  • Do you have to attend both sessions? Yes.
  • Will there be beverages? Of course. And lunch on Saturday.
  • How do I apply to participate? Find out more about Artists U and register here.
Any professional South Carolina artist may apply to attend (you do not have to live in Florence.) You will be notified once you are enrolled.  

April Showers Art Party – it’s raining umbrellas!

The April Showers Art Party is the kick-off event for the South Carolina Arts Commission's 50th Anniversary. Join the South Carolina Arts Foundation and the South Carolina Arts Commission April 5 to kick off the Arts Commission's 50th Anniversary! For half a century, the Arts Commission has served as an umbrella for arts development in the Palmetto State. The April Showers Art Party will carry out the umbrella theme via works of art by professionals and umbrellas embellished by students and installed in the ceiling. These decorative umbrellas will represent the 67 sites of the Arts in Basic Curriculum Project, which celebrates its 30th anniversary this year. April Showers will include a "Singin' in the Rain" performance by Ann Brodie's Carolina Ballet, an invitational art sale and a dance party featuring the Finesse Band. Tickets are $75 and can be purchased online. April Showers Art Party Wednesday, April 5 Grand Hall at 701 Whaley, Columbia, S.C. 7 p.m. - Singin'in the Rain Opening Performance, Ann Brodie's Carolina Ballet 7:30 - 9 p.m. - Invitational Art Sale 8:30 - 10:30 p.m. - Dance Party featuring the Finesse Band Find a list of participating artists and sponsors online. About the 50th Anniversary On June 7, 1967, Governor Robert E. McNair signed legislation creating the South Carolina Arts Commission, beginning a new era of public support for the arts in the Palmetto State. The legislation declared that the State of South Carolina would ensure that the arts “continue to grow and play an ever more significant part in the welfare and educational experiences of our citizens.” For 50 years, the Arts Commission has joined with individuals, institutions and professional organizations to advance the state’s commitment to create a thriving arts environment that benefits all citizens. From April 2017 through June 2018, the Arts Commission is celebrating 50 years of public support for the arts with kick-off events in Charleston, Columbia, and Greenville and exhibitions and performances showcasing the arts around the state. Check out the calendar of events and stay tuned for updates! SCAC-Logo_Icon-Stacked-FullColor  

Take a tour and hear the story behind Seeing Spartanburg in A New Light

If you haven't yet toured Spartanburg's public art exhibition, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light, here's your chance to do so and get the inside scoop from the creative team behind the project. The Chapman Cultural Center is hosting a two-day celebration of Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light beginning February 16 with a panel discussion and Q&A featuring the creative team involved with the project. The program continues February 17 with a tour by trolley of all nine installations, led by project artist Erwin Redl, and concludes with a presentation and reception back at the Chapman Cultural Center. Guests can take advantage of a discounted rate at the Spartanburg Marriott, conveniently located across the street from the Chapman Cultural Center. There will also be access to other local cultural institutions and exhibitions. One of four recipients of the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light is a large-scale public art exhibition that features nine original artworks by renown light and media artist Erwin Redl installed throughout 10 neighborhoods in Spartanburg. This project is an unprecedented partnership between Spartanburg's Chapman Cultural Center, Mayor Junie White, and the Police Department to use public art as a platform for building stronger relationships between local residents and police officers. Please RSVP by February 10, 2017 to Renee Denton at info@seeingspartanburg.com or (864) 278-9685. Via: Chapman Cultural Center

Public invited to Poetry Out Loud competitions

Nicole Sadek Nicole Sadek, 2016 S.C. Poetry Out Loud champion Since school began in the fall, high school students around the state have been memorizing poetry, practicing recitation skills and polishing performances to compete in Poetry Out Loud school-level competitions. School-based winners are competing in three regional competitions taking place January 21 and 22 in Spartanburg, Columbia and Charleston. Winners from each regional competition will advance to the state finals taking place March 11 in Columbia. The competitions are free and open to the public. Regional competition schedule:

  • Region 1 (Upstate) Jan. 21, from 2 - 4:30 p.m. Spartanburg Community College Downtown Campus, 220 E. Kennedy St., Spartanburg, SC 29302 (Please use entrance at back of building.) Counties: Oconee, Pickens, Greenville, Spartanburg, Cherokee, York, Lancaster, Chesterfield, Anderson, Laurens, Union, Chester, Abbeville, McCormick and Greenwood Partner: Hub City Writers Project
  • Region 2 (Midlands) Jan. 21 from 2 - 4:30 p.m. Richland Library Main (second floor), 1431 Assembly St., Columbia, S.C. 29201 Counties: Edgefield, Saluda, Newberry, Fairfield, Kershaw, Lee, Darlington, Marlboro, Aiken, Lexington, Richland, Sumter, Florence, Marion, Dillon and Calhoun Partners: One Columbia, South Carolina Center for Oral Narrative-USC Sumter and Richland Library Main
For 11 years, the South Carolina Arts Commission has partnered with the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation to bring the Poetry Out Loud National Poetry Recitation Contest to South Carolina. The Arts Commission engages regional partners to promote participation and to manage regional competitions. Nearly 4,000 South Carolina students participated this year. The state champion will compete in the national finals April 24-26 in Washington, D.C. About Poetry Out Loud Poetry Out Loud, a program created in 2005 by the National Endowment for the Arts and the Poetry Foundation, builds on the resurgence of poetry as an oral art form, as seen in the slam poetry movement. Students master public speaking skills, build self-confidence and learn about their literary heritage while gaining an appreciation of poetry. Last year more than 365,000 students nationwide competed. The national winner received a $20,000 scholarship.  

In Search of the Hunter Family Furniture Tradition

Hunter Family Child's Rocker Hunter Family child's rocker Hand-hewn wooden chairs with woven corn shuck seats are hallmarks of the Hunter family tradition, with examples found in museums and private collections throughout South Carolina. If you are one of those lucky private collectors, McKissick Museum wants to document and photograph your treasure for your reference and for inclusion in the McKissick Folklife Resource Center archive. Bring your chair to In Search of the Hunter Family Furniture Tradition February 11 from 1 – 4 p.m. at the museum, 816 Bull St. in Columbia. Free parking is available at McKissick Museum and in the Pendleton Street Garage, where metered spaces are free on Saturdays. This free event (open to everyone, not just chair owners) features a round table discussion with Hunter family members, woodworkers, seat weavers, scholars, collectors and conservators, including Hunter family historian Brenda Hunter Hanley, chair maker Harold Hunter, restoration and woodworks specialist Charles Boykin, and Southern furniture historian George Williams. Jeremy and Rebecca Wooten of Wooten & Wooten will provide documentation photography. In Search of the Hunter Family Furniture Tradition is held in conjunction with African American History Month and with the yearlong exhibition, A Compass to Guide: South Carolina Cabinet Makers Today. In addition to the pieces in the exhibit, McKissick Museum will present a pop-up display of Hunter family chairs to compare and contrast. Co-presented by the Columbia Woodworkers and the Greenville Woodworkers Guild, A Compass to Guide explores the inspiration behind diverse woodworking traditions of contemporary South Carolina furniture makers. This exhibition represents year four of McKissick’s Diverse Voices series, which celebrates the traditional arts and folkways of the Southeastern United States. In Search of the Hunter Family Furniture Tradition is made possible through support from the South Carolina Arts Commission, the National Endowment for the Arts, James A. Brannock Personal Property Appraisals LLC, Mann Tool & Supply, Inc., Greenville Woodworkers Guild, and Carolina Refinishing Supplies. For more information, visit McKissick Museum's website or call (803) 777-7251.

SC Arts Advocacy Day is February 7

Advocacy Day 2016 Advocacy Day 2016: Dr. Cedric Adderly, President, SC Governor's School for the Arts & Humanities; Carrie Power, Visual & Performing Arts Associate, SC Dept. Education; and Carol Baker, Chair of the SC Alliance for Arts Education. Join fellow arts advocates from around South Carolina in Columbia February 7 during Arts Advocacy Day, sponsored by the South Carolina Arts Alliance. The day begins at 11:30 a.m. in the State House lobby, with opportunities to thank legislators for their support of the arts. Arts advocates will be formally introduced as a group in both the House and Senate galleries. The luncheon takes place at 1 p.m. at the Capital City Club (across Gervais St. from the State House). Have lunch with your fellow arts advocates and legislators to again say "thank you" to Arts Caucus members and encourage all lawmakers to support the arts. The luncheon's guest speaker is Dr. Fred Carter, president of Francis Marion University and long-time supporter of the arts. South Carolina Arts Commission Executive Director Ken May will report on the current state and potential future of the arts. Pre-registration is required for the luncheon; reserve your seat by February 1. Find out more and reserve your ticket.  

Light and digital media artist ready to unveil public art installations in Spartanburg

The public is invited to Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light art installations taking place Oct. 4 beginning at 4:30 p.m. Full schedule listed below. SPARTANBURG, S.C. - Award-winning light and digital media artist Erwin Redl will unveil nine public art installations in Spartanburg, S.C. on Tuesday, Oct. 4 as a part of Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. For more than a year, Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light has been building relationships between police officers and communities through a collaborative art-making process. The installations will be illuminated in conjunction with National Night Out events across 10 city neighborhoods, starting with a celebration at 4:30 p.m. at Mobile Suspension downtown in Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main St. Composed of five curtains of semi-transparent acrylic panes – nearly 7,000 in total – Mobile Suspension (pictured above) is the result of Redl’s creative design and the collective efforts of residents and police officers who volunteered to assemble the large-scale installation. During the day, sunlight will shine through the mobile, casting colors onto the ground like stained glass. At night, LED lights provided by Hubbell Lighting Inc. in Greenville, S.C. will illuminate the mobile from below. The Oct. 4 event will feature music, food and comments from Spartanburg Mayor Junie White; Jennifer Evins, CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center; Spartanburg Police Chief Alonzo Thompson and neighborhood residents, who will talk about the year-long effort to revitalize the city through art. The illumination of each installation will coincide with a neighborhood celebration at the site, ending with a grand finale at 8:30 p.m. at Glow at the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine, 350 Howard St., Spartanburg, S.C. See below for a schedule of the Oct. 4 celebration. “By bringing site-specific art into Spartanburg neighborhoods where residents may feel isolated from traditional cultural assets, this project is already fostering greater understanding of both the artistic process and the transformative impact of public art,” said Jennifer Evins, president and CEO of the Chapman Cultural Center. “We are eliminating barriers as residents become part of the artistic process and help translate ideas into works of art.” In 2015, the City of Spartanburg was selected as one of four communities to participate in the Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge, a new program to support temporary public art projects that celebrate creativity, enhance urban identity, encourage public-private partnerships, and drive economic development. The temporary art project, funded by $1 million from Bloomberg Philanthropies, with supplemental funding provided by regional institutions, corporations, foundations and private donors, is a partnership among Redl, the Chapman Cultural Center, the City of Spartanburg and civic leadership. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wFJP1yJsiAg Redl, whose art installations have illuminated spaces worldwide, has been working with neighborhood residents and community leaders for more than a year to bring the project to life. The artist said each installation is tailored to its environment and that the scale, medium and design vary significantly, ranging from workshop-based video and smaller light installations to large-scale illuminations of two smokestacks. “Different structures lead to different aesthetic explorations and community engagement possibilities,” Redl said. “Alternative structures lead to alternative results. Change is inevitable, and, through this process, we begin to see Spartanburg in a new light.” Mayor White said the efforts of Redl and all of those across the community to bring Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light to life are already bearing fruit. "The night of Oct. 4 is going to be a great night in the history of our community,” said Spartanburg Mayor Junie White. “Something special is happening in Spartanburg right now. Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light is symbolic of what is happening here, and I can't wait to see the lights come on for everyone." Oct. 4 schedule of installations: Mobile Suspension, Downtown Spartanburg

  • Denny’s Plaza, 203 E. Main St.
  • Lights On – 4:30-6 p.m. Oct. 4
Five multicolored mobile curtains float above the center lawn of Denny’s Plaza, located in the heart of Spartanburg’s Downtown Cultural District. Each curtain is 51 feet long and 12 feet high and consists of a woven pattern of translucent acrylic 4-inch by 4-inch squares. The installation was designed to create a dazzling visual experience that changes depending on the time of day, the viewer’s position, and weather conditions. The five shimmering curtains are made of multicolored acrylic squares installed in specific patterns designed by the artist. Community volunteers assembled the curtains over a one-month period using specially designed clips. The rectangular shape of the site gave Redl an opportunity to play with subtle variations within a grid. The artist is interested in creating unique visceral sensations for viewers, and Mobile Suspension offers a kaleidoscopic experience that is fresh with each new encounter. River Poetry, Andrews Farm and Converse Heights
  • Cottonwood Trail, 1038 Woodburn Road
  • Lights On – 5:45 p.m.
Here, artist Erwin Redl provides an opportunity for visitors to contemplate the role of technology in our lives within a nature preserve. Located between Converse Heights and Andrews Farm neighborhoods, the Cottonwood Trail is a 116-acre urban greenspace with 4 1/2 miles of trails, and is owned and maintained by the Spartanburg Area Conservancy, a membership-based nonprofit organization. By juxtaposing LED displays similar to those used by restaurants and gas stations against the solitude of a meandering creek, the artist creates a tangible demonstration that nature and digital technology can coexist. The project presents local poetry displayed on 12 double-sided LED signs suspended above the Cottonwood Trail. Visitors can read the lines of poetry overhead as they walk along Lawson’s Fork Creek. The layered poetry dimension allows for the community to provide their thoughts, observations, and feelings about nature within this dynamic human/nature system created by the artist. The Hub City Writers Project will curate an ongoing series of poems for River Poetry through March 2017. Under One Roof, South Converse
  • Picnic Shelter, 440 S. Converse St.
  • Lights On – 6:10 p.m.
This park has special meaning to South Converse residents as a sign of local pride and a link to the past. The local neighborhood association fought hard to get this park funded and completed. Touched by the story of the park’s origin, and inspired by the evident pride in the place, Redl decided to use this picnic shelter to demonstrate the transformative power of turning something ordinary into something extraordinary. Residents have attended workshops to learn how to install and program the LED lighting for the shelter. Redl hopes local residents will want to create special light programs for dances, poetry slams, cookouts, or other events in and around the shelter. By using a simple picnic shelter as the basic structure within which many things can happen, and by involving the local community, Redl has tangibly illustrated that we are all indeed together under one roof. Islands of Light, Maxwell Hills
  • Duncan Park Lake, 293 West Park Drive
  • Lights On – 6:30 p.m.
Redl explores the fertile intersection of art, nature and technology with this installation of eight floating islands recalling the image of cattails or reeds swaying with the breeze in an aquatic environment. The scale of the site was particularly interesting to the artist, as it allowed for interactions among water, wind, and sky in addition to light and reflection. The logistical challenges of the project were first taken on by students from Daniel Morgan Technology Center. After meeting with the artist and an engineer, these young technicians created a working prototype, which became the blueprint for the finished islands. A local dock builder was engaged to install these light-topped atolls. The local waterfowl have officially adopted these islands of light. Benchmark Spartanburg, Forest Park
  • CC Woodson Recreation Center, 210 Bomar Avenue
  • Lights On – 6:55 p.m.
Benches are for sitting, yes, but they can also be a site for romance, business deals, creative pastimes or great conversations. Redl has created a chromatically pulsating bench that he hopes will invite community gatherings, poetry readings and other events that make use of the mesmerizing patterns and shifting color palette. The multiple RGB LED side-lit acrylic panels that make up the bench create an almost cinematic experience, saturating the surrounding environment with gradually morphing gradations of color. Spartanburg Swing, Hampton Heights
  • National Beta Headquarters, 267 S. Spring St.
  • Lights On – 7:15 p.m.
Twenty-six four-foot-long pendulums are evenly distributed across the glass facade of the National Beta Headquarters building. Their slow one-second pulse animates the surface of the concrete and glass structure. Mixing the simple physics of a pendulum with the off-the-shelf electronics of a small fan and flashlight LED, Spartanburg Swing creates a complex choreography. This kinetic work is controlled by small microprocessors that turn the fans and the lights on and off in intervals programmed by the artist. The pulsing movement is created entirely by intermittent fan bursts and the constant tug of gravity. The site is the international headquarters of National Beta, whose purpose is "to promote the ideals of academic achievement, character, leadership, and service among elementary and secondary school students." Headquartered in Spartanburg, the organization has more than 8,750 clubs nationally and internationally. The Hampton Heights neighborhood, comprised of homes built between the 1880s and the 1920s, is on the National Register of Historic Places. Video Village, Highland Neighborhood
  • Cammie Clagget Apartments, 317 Highland Avenue
  • Lights On – 7:35 p.m.
The artist decided he wanted to turn these empty buildings in the Cammie Clagget apartment complex inside out, transforming the now-vacant units into lanterns that face outward to tell their stories and cast their light into the surrounding community. The artist is interested in reanimating these empty spaces as a way to draw our attention to the question of impermanence and what might be possible for the future. Playing with the dual meaning of the word projection, Redl created a 52-channel video screen and directed White Elephant Enterprises and the Spartanburg Art Museum to curate the content for the installation. The selected videos feature a variety of topics but focus on stories of and about the residents of this historic neighborhood. The curators established a media production studio within the nearby Bethlehem Center to facilitate interviews with residents and to collect vintage home-movie footage and digitize family photographs from the community. The artist hopes to jump-start enthusiasm within the community for making videos of all kinds and sharing them in the public square. Glow, Beaumont Village and Northside
  • Beaumont smokestack, 400 Beaumont Avenue
  • Lights On – 8:05 p.m.
  • Northside smokestack, 350 Howard St.
  • Lights On and grand finale celebration – 8:30 p.m.
Both of the mill properties owned by Spartan Mills today serve new purposes, one as the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine and the other as the administrative offices of Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System. Originally constructed by master builder Thomas Badgett, these two colossal smokestack structures were built in the late nineteenth century out of locally made brick. Edifices such as these, in the heart of mill villages, have historical relevance and serve as symbols of adaptation and change. Redl has chosen to treat the smokestacks as two synchronized, large-scale canvases for high-powered multicolored lights that bathe the surface of the worn bricks. For the artist, these artworks offer a new way of seeing old structures. About the Artist Born in Austria in 1963, Erwin Redl finished his studies at the Vienna Music Academy with two degrees, a BA in Composition (1990) and BA in Electronic Music (1991). He was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship for graduate studies in computer art at the School of Visual Arts, in New York City (MFA 1995). Redl investigates the process of “reverse engineering” by (re-)translating the abstract aesthetic language of virtual reality and 3D computer modeling into architectural environments by means of large-scale light installations. For the 2002 Whitney Biennial, the artist covered the Whitney Museum’s facade with three multicolor LED veils. In 2008 he created a sound and light installation in the Austrian Pavilion at the World Expo in Zaragoza, Spain. The Pacific Design Center’s new Red Building by Cesar Pelli features four permanent installations by the artist, completed in 2013. Redl’s largest work to date is a computer-controlled, 580-foot-long-LED-installation at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, completed in 2010. Redl’s work is owned by prestigious national and international institutions, among them the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; the Milwaukee Art Museum; and Borusan Contemporary, Istanbul; as well as by private collectors. For more information, www.paramedia.net. About the Chapman Cultural Center The mission of the Chapman Cultural Center is to provide cultural leadership for Greater Spartanburg by developing, strengthening, and promoting the scope, excellence and educational role of the arts, humanities, and sciences, and to further their significance in the life of our community and all of its citizens. Founded in 1968 with a current budget of $2.1 million, the Chapman Cultural Center is the oldest and largest countywide arts agency in the state of South Carolina and is serving as the lead arts agency and project manager for Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light. About the Public Art Challenge & Bloomberg Philanthropies The City of Spartanburg was selected in 2015 as one of four temporary public art projects from across the United States to receive a grant award from the first-ever Bloomberg Philanthropies Public Art Challenge. Other winning cities are Gary, IN, Albany/Schenectady/Troy, NY, and Los Angeles, CA. Full information on all projects can be found at publicartchallenge.bloomberg.org. Bloomberg Philanthropies works in more than 120 countries around the world to ensure better, longer lives for the greatest number of people. The organization focuses on five key areas for creating lasting change: Arts, Education, Environment, Government Innovation and Public Health. Bloomberg Philanthropies encompasses all of Michael R. Bloomberg’s charitable activities, including his foundation and his personal giving. In 2015, Bloomberg Philanthropies distributed over half a billion dollars. For more information, please visit bloomberg.org or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter @BloombergDotOrg.